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Subject: Teachers Wanted: 112th Congress. rss

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Gary Dahl
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My game Politics and corruption involves soliciting votes for 24 different bills introduced by the 112th Congress. Bill cards include descriptions, vote breakdown, last action dates, and contribution alignments. Capital cards that are used to solicit votes include a variety of interesting terms, statistics, and quotes about the influence of money on Congress.

You can find the game here: https://www.thegamecrafter.com/games/politics-and-corruption (there's a like to the rules near the bottom of the page)

I would love to work with any teachers interested in using this game in the classroom to help them develop lesson plans and other supplemental resources. Please leave me a message below, or here: http://sugarpillstudios.com/wp/?page_id=511 if you are interested in collaborating on this. Best, Gary.
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James Fung
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The rules link isn't working for me.
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Gary Dahl
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Thanks for the interest James. Here's another link that you are welcome to try: http://sugarpillstudios.com/games/politicsandcorruption/PAC_...

I'm curious to hear how you attempted to access the link mentioned above. I believe that the game crafter's rules links may not be storable as bookmarks or saved links, but am interested in learning if there are other limitations. Best, Gary.
 
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Calavera Soñando
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Ok - I read the rules after you updated the link.

What is the intended age group for the game?
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Gary Dahl
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Hey Calavera, I had high school and college students in mind when designing the game (as well as adults), although I suspect younger students could handle the gameplay with a bit more explanation and help getting started. I'm certainly interested in hearing your thoughts on this as well. Best, Gary.
 
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James Fung
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I tried the following to access the link:

1) Click on the link. Nothing happened.
2) Right click and open in new tab. This opened a blank tab, like sometimes happens in a javascript failure.

I may be biased, but I'm not sure of the suitability for college students. If I understand correctly, the point of the game is the behavior that emerges when there's a lot of money involved in the legislative process. However, at some point the game becomes more game than simulation. I'd expect a college classroom to go into much more depth about how the system works. As it is, the game appears somewhat abstract in how it models support and the passing of bills. I'm also ignoring the trivia in the card flavor text because I believe trivia has no place in the college classroom. Either the fact is integrated into the course objectives (and game mechanics) to sharpen the student's ability to think about events and solve problems, or they are trivial and can be safely ignored.

I could see it in a high school or younger curriculum, however, to show students that our legislative process is not solely determined by the constitution, but is a function of many forces and influences.
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Gary Dahl
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Thanks for the feedback James. It is much appreciated. You are right in pointing out that the game is an abstraction of the process that is certainly more game than simulation. My purpose in doing this is two-fold. First, I hope that it creates the tension of feeling the need to compromise on some issues to help advance others in a compelling way. Second, I hope that the abstraction stimulate interesting dialog about how the game does relate to reality or to a hypothetical "ideal" government. Where is the line between illegal bribery and legal fundraising. Is the abstraction of time in the game important? How does it capture or betray reality? What kinds of resource do the cards represent (the rules refer to them generally as capital)?

Thanks again James for taking the time to review and weigh in on using Politics and Corruption in the classroom. I'm sure your words will continue to influence my view of this project as I collect more feedback over the next weeks.
 
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Gary Dahl
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BoardGameGeek » Forums » Gaming Related » Games in the Classroom
Re: Teachers Wanted: 112th Congress.
Getting some good feedback from teachers and college professors, and would love to hear more. To make it easier to evaluate, I've put together a video demonstrating how the game is played: http://youtu.be/9QivO3TCujo I'm thinking about compiling a few variation on the rules for the game to make is simpler and quicker to teach, and more focused on particular aspects of the game that align well with more focused learning objectives. Would love to hear, if anyone is interested in trying this with their class, or contributing ideas/suggestions for making it more effective there.
 
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