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Subject: The Ultimate Dice As Resources Game rss

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Jesse Dean
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Troyes, the debut game of Belgian publisher Pearl Games, is the latest in a line of games that are based on using dice as a resource. This game differs from others in this particular category in both general weight (it is a much meatier game than Alien Frontiers, Kingsburg, or Yspahan) and in how the dice are used. These differences are sufficient that I consider Troyes to be both the best of the dice as resource games, but also a fine game in general, one that has a place in many collections.

Thematically, Troyes is about the development and protection of the city of Troyes by 2-4 families. Each of them does this through influence in one of three areas: the military (represented by the Palace), the clergy (represent by the Bishopric), and civil society (represented by City Hall). Through both exploiting the opportunities available in the city and dealing with challenges that afflict the city, the players can accumulate victory points and win the game.



Now at the basic level, this doesn’t sound really all that much different from a billion other eurogames out there, and I admit that prior to Essen, I was skeptical of the game. I wasn’t even aware that it was designed as a medium-heavy strategy game, so I did not even bother including it in my Gamer's Games of Essen 2010 geeklist. However, some of the low-level background buzz prior to the convention was sufficient that I decided it was worth checking out. I read the rules and saw that there were some interesting things going on, but decided to wait to see how it performed at Essen. It ended up performing like gangbusters at the show, ending up near the top of both the Fairplay and the Geekbuzz charts, which was sufficient for me to give the rulebook a second look and, ultimately, import the game. Plays since then have proven that while not a ground-breaking innovator like Dominion or Caylus, or a virtual masterpiece like Dominant Species, it is still a very interesting design and one I am glad to have in my collection.

Components

There is nothing particularly exceptional or awful about the material quality of Troyes’ components. What is notable, however, is the game’s artwork.



I found the medieval style of the illustrations to be quite enjoyable and very evocative of the game’s theme. It seems that most games set in this era tend to use more modern styles of art. While I appreciate the art in many of these games, I found Troyes’s design to be a refreshing change of pace.

The complaints I have about the components are more due to their scarcity then their quality. Only two English languages player aids are provided, which, while understandable, is also inconvenient at times. Additionally, more money could have been included in the game, as there are some card combinations that can result in quite a bit of income and few ways to suck money out of the economy, resulting in the money supply running out. This happened to us once, and it was not pleasant.



Theme
While Troyes’ theme is not particularly extraordinary, it is consistent throughout the elements of the game. Removing a level of abstraction from the game shows that each activity card and event card makes thematic sense. So, for example, the Miller generates money based on the number of citizens you have in either the Bishopric or the Palace, which makes sense, as a Miller would make money selling grain to individuals in the nobility and the clergy. Other cards and events are similarly thematically tight.



Mechanics
To understand Troyes, you need to understand its dice mechanic. Before the game starts, each player is given a selection of “citizens” (meeples) that are placed in one of three different building areas: the Bishopric, City Hall, and the Palace. Each of these areas represents one type of dice, each with slightly different characteristics and benefits. All of the dice are associated with particular dice generation locations, activity cards, and events, but each of the dice types has a secondary characteristic and associated use. White dice are generated by citizens in the Bishopric and represent religious power; they can also be used for building the cathedral. Yellow dice, which are generated by citizens in the City Hall and represent mercantile power, can be used to generate money. Red dice, which are generated by citizens in the Palace, are especially effective at fighting off military events. Each die also has an effective upkeep cost that affects its round-by-round income. The combination of variable incomes and dice powers ensures that most of the time, players will end up with slightly different capabilities at the beginning of the game; however, there is really a limited amount of luck in creating this variable starting position. Turn order position is random, but after that, it’s entirely the player’s choices that will determine the setup.

After generating income, each player rolls dice based on where their citizens are placed. These dice are placed into the central hub of the board next to a token indicating the player’s color. Any spots in the dice generation buildings that are not occupied by players are instead rolled by a generic “neutral player.” This means that at the beginning of each round, there will always be 18 rolled dice in the central area of the board available for use or purchase. These will be used primarily during the action phase for the purpose of action selection.



The action phase is where the bulk of Troyes’ activity happens and where many of its most interesting aspects are found. What happens is that each player, in turn, selects an action to perform using a group of identically colored dice. You can choose to use the dice you rolled or dice that the other players rolled, but to use dice other players rolled, you have to purchase them. Purchasing them requires an amount of money that is dependent on the size of the dice group you are building. If your final dice group is size three, each purchased dice costs $6; if the final dice group is size two, each purchased dice costs $4; if you are purchasing a single die for use by itself, it costs $2. As the dice are used, they are removed from the available pools of dice until all players choose to pass or the dice run out.

In many ways, Troyes’ action phase feels most like the worker placement phase of other games, with groups of dice standing in for individual workers. However, instead of a steadily decreasing access to locations on the board (though there is a little bit of that going on too), there is instead a steady decrease of the dice available for players to use. What makes this more interesting than the typical worker placement mechanic is how interactive it is. By dividing up the action selection into individual dice that can be combined into groups and purchased from other players, an additional level of nuance and tension is added to the game. Not only do you have to decide where you are going to use your dice, but you also have to decide which types of dice you will use and in what quantity. You are only permitted to use three dice of one color at a time, so if you have particularly high dice in multiple colors or a lot of high dice in one color, there is a reasonably high chance that at least some of them will be purchased for use by other players by the time your turn comes around again, thus forcing you into hard decisions and also mitigating the impact of high rolls somewhat. If you get too lucky, the other players will buy that luck away. This layered decision-making adds additional tactical tension to the action phase, which pushes it ahead of most other worker placement games and all other dice as resource games.

The majority of the gameplay, which I am not going to detail here because the rulebook does an excellent job of doing so, is focused on using the dice to perform a variety of creations and conversions of influence, money, and victory points, with the ultimate goal of accruing the most victory points and winning. For the most part, this is handled through a variety of activity and event cards, each of which provides a divisor which determines the number of times that individual card can be activated. There are also spots such as the Bishopric, City Hall, Palace, and Cathedral which give good uses for single dice of various types.


Some things you can spend dice groups on.

Influence points, in addition to being a currency you can use with certain activity cards to acquire money or victory points, have the added benefit of being one of the methods by which you can mitigate some of the game’s dice luck. Spending one point will allow you to reroll a die in your area, and spending 4 will let you flip up to 3 dice to their opposite sides. As a result, if you have a good amount of influence, it may be better to roll low numbers than high numbers, since the other players are less likely to buy your dice and you can flip them over into the numbers you need at the right moment.

Balance
While I had some balance concerns prior to my first play of this game, these were mostly absolved by the third and fourth plays. The one remaining concern that I have is about turn order. In the three- and four-player game, all players do not have an equal opportunity to be start player; with the inflation of money supply between the first round and the later ones, the earlier starting players have an opportunity to buy the dice they want from other players in order to accomplish their goals. This is mitigated somewhat by the fact that players earlier in the initiative order have to deal with the military threats to the city in the form of black dice; additionally, only one color of dice may be used at a time, leaving remaining colors open for purchase by other players. However, I still retain some concern about turn order advantage. Further play will hopefully identify how much of an issue this is, and what corrective action would be suitable to balance this out.

Luck
Amusingly enough for a game where a major part of the resolution mechanic involves dice, the dice are not a major source of luck in this game. The liquidity of dice ownership, thanks to the purchase mechanic, and the numerous ways of mitigation of dice luck from activity cards, influence points, and simply having useful places to place dice means that there are few truly bad rolls.

The activity cards are, along with the event cards, the main sources of variability in the game. Nine cards are available in any given game, out of a pool of 27. Each set of nine cards is divided into three groups of three, each of which is associated with an available dice type. This variability is reduced by a couple of things, the most prominent of which is the fact that, while there are three different cards in each “level” per dice type, the cards in each color/level have a very similar mechanical theme, meaning that usually a player can be fairly certain of what abilities they will get from a given level of cards. Additionally, in the four player game, all of the cards are revealed by halfway through the game, meaning that players have a reasonable amount of time to build plans to take advantage of these cards. If this is still too much for you, then the whole situation can easily be resolved by revealing all activity cards during the first activity phase, with access restrictions gradually lifted until all of them are available starting in the third round.

This leaves the event cards as a significant source of randomness. They have an even more limited range of potential effects, so it is pretty easy after a game or two to realize what could be potentially be coming out of the deck and plan for that eventuality. While you do not know exactly what is coming out of the deck, you have enough of an idea of what is coming that the events should not cost you the game.

Conclusion
As you could probably tell from my review, I like Troyes. I typically do not enjoy dice resource games, but Troyes has proven that was a matter of implementation rather than due to the inherent nature of dice resource games themselves. Troyes’ core mechanic is so clever, and the trappings around it so fun, that I expect to regularly play this game for the foreseeable future. I definitely recommend it.

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Shawn Woods
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Thanks for the review, Jesse! I am loving the art for this game. I am looking forward to the release of this game here in Canada.
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Ben
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Very nicely done, Jesse. Your appreciation for the game's subtleties is both obvious and extremely helpful.

I'm also glad to hear that you're a fan of the art. My wife loves it -- it may be her favorite part of the game (the use of a neutral player is her least) -- and I agree that it adds a lot to the experience of playing.

I'll need a few more plays to know exactly where I come down on the game, though the early feelings are trending positive. It certainly has a lot more to chew on than the other dice-based games I've tried, and will likely be the only one that lasts in my collection for any length of time.
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Jesse Dean
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Thanks!

Its amazing what you can come to discover when you really sink your teeth into a game and try to figure how it ticks.

I originally had a lot more detail about all the mechanical intricacies of the game that I adored (which resulted in a review that was twice as long as it is now), but my lovely editor insisted that I cut that section down a bit. There really is a lot to admire and explore in this design.

If I may ask, why does your wife dislike the neutral player?
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Ben
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doubtofbuddha wrote:
If I may ask, why does your wife dislike the neutral player?

Primarily, I think she just associates neutral players with tacked-on two-player variants and is therefore inclined to dislike them. She does have a few legitimate gripes, however. First, it slows down the game a bit to have one player perform a second roll-and-place action every turn while the others have nothing to do. Second, there aren't enough neutral meeples to cover every contingency, and the rules don't provide guidance on how to resolve meeple scarcity. Third, it is almost always a better decision to buy neutral dice than to buy an opponent's dice, which dilutes some of the interaction between players. This is especially true in the two-player game, where your own dice and the neutral dice comprise roughly 2/3 of the dice available, and the players each have enough meeples to diversify. You can go several rounds without purchasing an opponent's die.

For what it's worth, none of those complaints really bother me, but I think she'd prefer it to be a more pure head-to-head contest without this other entity getting involved.
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Jesse Dean
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Fair enough!

From my perspective, the neutral player's dice are just another potential resource to compete over. By eliminating the neutral dice, especially if you do it in smaller groups, you can force your opponent to transfer more money to you for their big dice combos. Additionally, it is important to ensure that there are exactly 18 dice in the game every round, to make sure that everyone gets sufficient action opportunities. That being said, I can see where she is coming from, as I hate tacked-on two player rules two, I just do not see this as being one of them.
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Nicolai Broen Thorning
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doubtofbuddha wrote:
You can choose to use the dice you rolled or dice that the other players rolled, but to use dice other players rolled, you have to purchase them using the method noted above.

I am not seeing this method described - perhaps it was part of the cut?

Great review though and it made me even more curious.

I also appreciate the discussion in the comments on the 2 player game as this would be our usual player count.

Thank you.
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Carl Johan Ragnarsson
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I had some problems with the neutral player too. Mainly, it was one of the Attack Cards where the neutral player attacks one of the 3 buildings where you store your dice (Wayfarers, Theological Conflict and Succession Conflict). This can be a pretty big blow, although it will of course treat players fairly (as fair dice always do).

Also, I suppose that you must have seen also that sometimes some combination will just be the most powerful one of that game, and everyone will try to use it?
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Neil Cook
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Taibi wrote:


I also appreciate the discussion in the comments on the 2 player game as this would be our usual player count.

Thank you.


Note that the neutral player is used regardless of the number of players. It's not simply a "2 player variant".

Excellent review for an excellent game. This is my favourite game of this years Essen crop so far...
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Garry Rice
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Agreed - I really like the artwork as well...looking forward to Zman bringing it over here next year.
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Nicolai Broen Thorning
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Pallet Ranger wrote:
Taibi wrote:


I also appreciate the discussion in the comments on the 2 player game as this would be our usual player count.

Thank you.


Note that the neutral player is used regardless of the number of players. It's not simply a "2 player variant".

Excellent review for an excellent game. This is my favourite game of this years Essen crop so far...

Noted, thanks.
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Carl Johan Ragnarsson
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Taibi wrote:

I also appreciate the discussion in the comments on the 2 player game as this would be our usual player count.


I personally think the 2-player game is not as interesting as with more players (wrote a separate Session report about our first try, and have played it once more since then). The main reason is that even more than with 3 or 4, both players will (or at least may) be going for basically the same thing.

In the 3 or 4 player game, if the first 2 players both go for big groups of red dice, the 3rd player will have to do something else in that round. In the 2-player, it is likely that if there is a tempting option with red, both players can use one red group each.
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Jesse Dean
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Troyes » Forums » Reviews
Re: The Ultimate Dice As Resources Game
Taibi wrote:

I am not seeing this method described - perhaps it was part of the cut?


Indeed it was. Let me see what I can do about that...
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Jesse Dean
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minismurf wrote:
I had some problems with the neutral player too. Mainly, it was one of the Attack Cards where the neutral player attacks one of the 3 buildings where you store your dice (Wayfarers, Theological Conflict and Succession Conflict). This can be a pretty big blow, although it will of course treat players fairly (as fair dice always do).

Also, I suppose that you must have seen also that sometimes some combination will just be the most powerful one of that game, and everyone will try to use it?


Yeah, that can be painful, but with the prevelance of money, particularly in the late game, it is usually not that much of a problem unless you are trying to take advantage of the Procession. Unfortunately that happened to me when we played yesterday; two of my citizens were ejected from buildings in the same round, and I was able to take advantage of the Procession that round, but it was more difficult later on, particularly as my opponents started targetting my dice pool to make sure it was not possible.

That is generally what has happened with those most powerful combinations you describe. In the four player game, the other players have generally done a very good job of keeping anyone from abusing any one combo too regularly. It requires attentive groups to do this, but that is true of most interactive games, so I don't consider that to be an issue at all.
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Jesse Dean
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minismurf wrote:

I personally think the 2-player game is not as interesting as with more players (wrote a separate Session report about our first try, and have played it once more since then). The main reason is that even more than with 3 or 4, both players will (or at least may) be going for basically the same thing.

In the 3 or 4 player game, if the first 2 players both go for big groups of red dice, the 3rd player will have to do something else in that round. In the 2-player, it is likely that if there is a tempting option with red, both players can use one red group each.


You are probably correct about the 2 player game being less interesting than the 3 or 4 player game, but I've noticed that because of how easy it is for other players to take advantages of an individual's dice, it frequently only matters a little bit what an individual player rolls. For example, in a game I played Saturday I was able to win thanks to good use of the Captain even though I was not producing any red dice of my own later in the game. I just bought the ones I needed. In that respect what any individual player is rolling only has a minimal impact on the game. What the two player game lacks in comparison to the 3 or 4 player game is number of interactions. You aren't just dealing with one opponent, so you have to account for the dice that two other people are likely to use rather than one. The extra control can be pretty fun however, and I've enjoyed my two player games.
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Stephane Josephy
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Exellent review! I just happened to have posted one myself today, and we seem to agree on most points (except that you express it better blush ).

You don't seem to mention secret characters, though. In my game groups, it has been identified as the main randomness generator, and it bothers some of the players. Any thoughts on that, from your point of view? We're wondering if it wouldn't be better without them...

Also, very good point on the turn order advantage! Didn't even think of it. Perhaps giving the 1st player card to the player with least Influence Points would be an idea?
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Jesse Dean
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I don't consider the secret characters to be a significant source of randomness, simply because everyone gets the points from them. If you can divine other people's secret goal cards (or simply try to hit as many of the thresholds as possible) then it should not inflict significant randomness on to the game.

Honestly, I've thought about it even more since I wrote this review, and I think that the only real turn order advantage might be in the hands of the second player. This is because that one of the big advantages of going earlier in the turn order is being able to buy exactly the dice you want, and that is not really reasonably possible in the first turn of the game. It is quite possibly not even really possible in the second turn of the game either (in which case there is no turn order advantage), but that means that the second player is the only one who really has a big advantage from turn order. .

If I was to give turn order based on relative position rather than around the table, which I am unconvinced is actually a problem, then I would do it based on least money rather than on influence.
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Stephane Josephy
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On the other hand, the second player is probably the one who will have to spend the most dice fighting the black ones. I guess it evens out pretty good.

(in a 4p game, I mean)
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Jesse Dean
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Indeed. The more I explore this game, the more I am impressed by its design. Which means it has strong 9 potential.
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Ben
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nounet wrote:
You don't seem to mention secret characters, though. In my game groups, it has been identified as the main randomness generator, and it bothers some of the players. Any thoughts on that, from your point of view? We're wondering if it wouldn't be better without them...

I can't speak for Jesse, but, as someone who was initially bothered by the randomness of the activity cards, the character cards have never bothered me. In both the 2- and 4-player game, 4 of the 6 possible characters are in play and affect all players. As long as everyone at the table knows what all the characters do, deducing the characters involved based on your opponents' play is certainly doable. Moreover, all of the characters benefit players for doing things they will already be doing for much of the game (gaining money, gaining influence, combatting events, etc.), so even if you don't realize that a certain character is in play until mid-way in the game, you aren't likely to be in an irreparable position. Of course, if you guess incorrectly and overcommit to a particular path, it will hurt you, but I find this to provide an interesting dynamic.

In my last 2-player game, for example, the characters played a memorable role. My wife was building at the Cathedral frequently, and I began to suspect that she had the character that rewarded Cathedral-building. I used several turns ensuring that I had plenty of cubes on the cathedral (which was difficult because it was getting quite full). Only in the last few moments did it become obvious that she actually had the card that rewarded influence, and that she had been building in the Cathedral to gain influence while throwing me off the scent. By the time this was apparant, I had already spent much of my influence (including some to manipulate my white dice so that I could fit in the last few Cathedral spots). I was out of position and had few options to recover. She won handedly. I think the psychology behind the play enhances my enjoyment of the game. I suspect that every time we play this game, I will likely fondly remember that moment of panic when the reality of her tactic dawned on me. I merely hope I learned from it well enough to not make the same mistake again.
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Steve Duff
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chally wrote:
Second, there aren't enough neutral meeples to cover every contingency, and the rules don't provide guidance on how to resolve meeple scarcity.


Has that been a problem? There are 8 neutrals, so that would require allowing the event cards to push out player dice three times, without reacting and re-pushing out the neutral (or pushed them out before the event cards struck at all). If one had been pushed out the same turn and way lying down, you'd grab that one and put it back in.

Regardless, the event rules do state what to do:

Quote:
Note: : If the 8 neutral citizens are already in play, ignore the Event cards that add new ones.
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Ben
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UnknownParkerBrother wrote:
chally wrote:
Second, there aren't enough neutral meeples to cover every contingency, and the rules don't provide guidance on how to resolve meeple scarcity.


Has that been a problem? There are 8 neutrals, so that would require allowing the event cards to push out player dice three times, without reacting and re-pushing out the neutral (or pushed them out before the event cards struck at all). If one had been pushed out the same turn and way lying down, you'd grab that one and put it back in.

Regardless, the event rules do state what to do:

Quote:
Note: : If the 8 neutral citizens are already in play, ignore the Event cards that add new ones.


Thanks, Stephen. I can always rely on you to find the rules that I'm overlooking. meeple

It was an issue in our second two-player game. The neutral player starts with 6 meeples already placed and we promptly revealed at least two events that displaced our meeples with neutral ones. In this game, money was easy to come by and neither of us felt compelled to re-displace the neutral player (we were more likely to displace each other). When the event was supposed to be triggered again, we ignored the event, but my wife was a little peeved because the first event had displaced her, and the second would have displaced me (we rolled the die before we realized that there were no more neutral meeples).

We were likely playing suboptimally, as we were (and are) still exploring the game's nuances, but I don't think it takes unreasonably bad play for it to crop up in a 2-player game from time to time.
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Alain Orban
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chally wrote:

In my last 2-player game, for example, the characters played a memorable role. My wife was building at the Cathedral frequently, and I began to suspect that she had the character that rewarded Cathedral-building. I used several turns ensuring that I had plenty of cubes on the cathedral (which was difficult because it was getting quite full). Only in the last few moments did it become obvious that she actually had the card that rewarded influence, and that she had been building in the Cathedral to gain influence while throwing me off the scent. By the time this was apparant, I had already spent much of my influence (including some to manipulate my white dice so that I could fit in the last few Cathedral spots). I was out of position and had few options to recover. She won handedly. I think the psychology behind the play enhances my enjoyment of the game. I suspect that every time we play this game, I will likely fondly remember that moment of panic when the reality of her tactic dawned on me. I merely hope I learned from it well enough to not make the same mistake again.


It's exactly what we wanted to have with the characters.
Congratulations to your wife !!!! Next time, I hope that you'll do the same !! Don't forget to let us know !!!
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doubtofbuddha wrote:
minismurf wrote:

I personally think the 2-player game is not as interesting as with more players (wrote a separate Session report about our first try, and have played it once more since then). The main reason is that even more than with 3 or 4, both players will (or at least may) be going for basically the same thing.

In the 3 or 4 player game, if the first 2 players both go for big groups of red dice, the 3rd player will have to do something else in that round. In the 2-player, it is likely that if there is a tempting option with red, both players can use one red group each.


You are probably correct about the 2 player game being less interesting than the 3 or 4 player game, but I've noticed that because of how easy it is for other players to take advantages of an individual's dice, it frequently only matters a little bit what an individual player rolls. For example, in a game I played Saturday I was able to win thanks to good use of the Captain even though I was not producing any red dice of my own later in the game. I just bought the ones I needed. In that respect what any individual player is rolling only has a minimal impact on the game. What the two player game lacks in comparison to the 3 or 4 player game is number of interactions. You aren't just dealing with one opponent, so you have to account for the dice that two other people are likely to use rather than one. The extra control can be pretty fun however, and I've enjoyed my two player games.


I wanted to emphasize this particular point. I was one of the players in the first two game Jesse played. I really missed that connection and I think it contributed to my abysmmal 4th place finish in the second game. You really need to scan all 24 dice and look for your options. If you fixate on "my dice" you will rob yourself of a lot of options and opportunities. I do not play a lot of Euros but would be happy to play Troyes whenever it is offered. Far more player interaction which appeals to my wargamer background.

In contrast, we also got in two games of London at the same session and I found that to be far less stimulating an experience. As a player in London, I felt I had far less ability to interfere with or derail another player's engine.

Anyway, great review Jesse.
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Alex Rockwell
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Interesting. I didnt really enjoy my play of Troyes much and I'd be interested to know what you think of my experience.


First off, I played 4 player, and it took over two hours (three new players). I think I wouldve been much more favorable to it if it were shorter. During that two hours I got to do about 10 things. In each round my first action would generally be some sort of strong multi dice action, the second would be somewhat weak, and then there might be enough scraps left for a third. There were abilities to buy but it felt like you had time to use them approximately once before it ended.

In each turn it was impossible to plan ahead. Almost all moves were the player whose turn it is calculating what the best available action was that they didnt have to massively overpay for, and then doing it. Usually, they just stole the action the next player was going to do so he must recalculate. It felt like a ton of downtime. Dice being 'yours' seemed nearly irrelevant. If they were good the best couple were stolen unless you were early in the turn order, and you got like $4. And then because your dice had been stolen you paid about that much money back to someone else or the bank to use their dice instead. Not knowing what things were worth bonus points at the end mostly resulted in big point swings. We were all pretty close in points, and the fact that say, cash awarded nothing at the end (even though one player had been building a hoard of it), while other things did matter, determined the winner.

Sure, they did a good job of making the difference in value between different die rolls very low in general. But this was overwhelmed by the fact that I felt like I sat there doing nothing for a massive amount of time and then got to do a relatively small number of actual things during that time, each of which required a lot of calculation and min-maxing, of all possible opportunities, because I can use ANY of the dice in play for various costs.

The player who had played before said they played it 2 player before and found it massively better like that, as they were actually able to plan more (with only one action between turns), able to do more things over the course of a turn (not just one good action and one bad action), and that money was actually tight in the 2 player (whereas in our game we all developed piles of near worthless money that we passed back and forth to steal dice). And even more important it was a lot shorter for 2 while our 4 player felt super long. (I could've played a pretty heavy and deep game during the time it took to play...a dice game).

Maybe it should be played faster and lightly. But then, the guy who plays it fast and doesnt calculate not only loses, he also hands it to the player after whim because he is leaving too many good opportunities available that he shouldve taken himself.



(I should add however that I love 2 player Kingsburg played in 45 minutes, while I hate 4-5 player Kingsburg played in multiple hours. So maybe my Troyes experience is just the same?)
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