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A Gnome's Ponderings

I'm a gamer. I love me some games and I like to ramble about games and gaming. So, more than anything else, this blog is a place for me to keep track of my ramblings. If anyone finds this helpful or even (good heavens) insightful, so much the better.

Archive for Lowell Kempf

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The BBC is bringing the Clangers back and with William Shatner. Just wow.

Lowell Kempf
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One of the most startling things that I have seen lately was a commercial that let me know that the BBC was bringing back the Clangers and that William Shatner would be be a part of it.

Literally, my first thought was "Seriously? Are we talking about that weird show with the stop motion mice that whistle on the moon that confused me as a child? They can't really be talking about that!"

But yes, that is exactly what we are talking about. I remember seeing it in the early 80s and it left enough of an impression on me that I haven't forgotten about it. I would not called the Clangers disturbing or that weird but just profoundly different. I don't think too many kids would get nightmares from the Clangers unless they also got nightmares from Sesame Street. But I do remember thinking this is strange and that I was missing something about it on a fundamental level.

In the last 30 or so years, my only exposure to the Clangers was Roger Delgado as the Master watching a clip in the Sea Devils, which was also the first Doctor Who story I ever watched. That at least convinced me that the Clangers had a firm place in pop culture.

And, on top of bringing the show back for the first time in over 40 years, they producers have chosen William Shatner to be the narrator. Wow. From the commercial clip, it sounds like he is embracing the the spoken word style that made his rendition of Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds unforgettable.

I have a feeling that the new Clangers is either going to be bizarrely brilliant and wonderful or a complete train wreck. Either way, combining knitted mice with William Shatner is going to set new levels of trippiness.
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Tue May 26, 2015 7:31 pm
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Delta Green - it's not just a sanity and soul destroying conspiracy, it's a job

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Delta Green is a setting that has almost a legendary status inside my own head. I first became aware of it in the early nineties when my GM used a modified version of it for his Call of Cthulhu game. By the time I was going to conventions and going through boxes of books, it was between printings and hard to find.

But we now live in a post PDF world. So much that was out-of-print and didn't show much signs of being reprinted is now not only available but also affordable to boot. Sometimes, those gems from the past turn out to be not nearly as good as you had hoped. I'm sorry but pages upon pages of charts don't make for interesting reading.

On the other hand, the core book for the Delta Green setting is some good stuff.

I am pretty sure anyone who is reading this is already familiar with the concept of Delta Green but, on the off chance you're not, here's the elevator pitch. Delta Green is a Call of Cthulhu setting where the players are members of an unofficial government agency that tries to deal with mythos problems in the modern world.

And, wouldn't you know it, it actually predates the X-Files.

Looking back, I think I can get away with saying that Delta Green was both genre redefining and genre creating. While there has already been a modern day setting for Call of Cthulhu, Delta Green pulled the game, gibbering and whispering, into ideas that both made sense for a modern setting and, quite frankly, made it even more disturbing by combining eldritch horrors with government conspiracies.

More than twenty years later, this stuff is old hat. And it's hardly like Delta Green came out of nowhere. Trust No One is an idea that's been around for a while. And the idea of updating the horrors of the Mythos had been done before. (Karl Wagner's 1974 short story "Sticks" took the Mythos from 1942 into the modern world into a way that remains fascinating and horrifying. Great piece)

But Delta Green did a really good job and that's why it is still around today, inspiring new games and new fiction and still beloved.

I have a feeling that Delta Green is going to be a topic I'll come to.

However, when of the initial things that startled me about Delta Green was something that I read in the introduction. The genesis of Delta Green was not a desire to combine government conspiracies and UFO theories with the Cthulhu Mythos. It was to create a framework to explain why a bunch of disparate characters would get together and try and thwart Mythos horrors.

When I read that, I was struck by both the simplicity and brilliance of that goal.

Let's face it. Even in games like D&D, the justification of a ragtag bunch of misfits going out to raid dungeons, kill dragons and save the world can be a little slender and we are talking about a setting where adventurer is an accepted profession. However, Call of Cthulhu has players playing relatively normal people in what appears, on the surface, to be the world we actually live in.

Be honest, if you were given a chance to deal with eldritch horrors who are vastly more powerful than humanity and whose mere existence could drive you stark raving mad, would you jump at the chance or would you run screaming, possibly moving to another continent under a new name?

Personally, me and my family would be in Australia in a month and be calling ourselves the Joneses.

I know it was a struggle to justify the group being together when I used to run Call of Cthulhu games. Everyone getting invited to a reading of a will that ended in being trapped together in a nightmare was one of the better ones.

Delta Green solves the problem of why the characters are working together and why they have anything to do with the Mythos in an incredibly simple way. It's their job. Sure, it's an ugly, nasty job that they may not have voluntarily chosen and a job that has them sinking into a swamp of conspiracies and horrors that will end in death and/or madness but it's still a job.

There is a whole lot more to Delta Green than just that. It's my job to fight eldritch horrors could easily turn into comedy or slapstick adventure. Instead, Delta Green is probably one of the bleakest flavors of Call of Cthulhu that isn't set after the Great Old Ones came back. You aren't dealing with the odd monster out in the middle of nowhere or a cult that is in the lunatic fringes of society. The Mythos has become a conspiracy made up of the government and the one percent. The Mythos wears silk, tailor-made suits and is on the Internet. It's closer than your backyard. Getting to wrestle a deep one will probably feel like a relief.

Getting a chance to explore Delta Green's RPG books and fiction is a lot of fun. It is a well devised and well researched and well written creation. But I love the fact that it's fundamental concept is that Delta Green is the last job you will ever have. Ever.
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Tue May 26, 2015 1:57 am
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The disparity of Skype and Bleed

Lowell Kempf
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Two topics that I've written about in the past are playing role playing games via Skype and Bleed as a role playing concept. Bleed, by the way, is when real emotions end up bleeding into the game.

A lot of indie style games make use of Bleed. In fact, Avery Mcdaldno probably could be the patron saint of Bleed and I mean that in the best of ways. There are some games, like Kagematsu, that will really only work due to Bleed.

I went through a period of playing a lot of indie games before I left Chicago. And, for variety of reasons, that's still where my RPG interests lie. And many of those games either make an active use of Bleed or create big opportunities for Bleed.

(In case you're curious, Polaris, Apocalypse World, the Quiet Year, Ribbon Drive and Fiasco are some of the big examples of games with Bleed in my experience. I know there are tons of other examples.)

These days, most of my RPG experiences are via Skype. And, to be honest, Skype and Bleed don't mix well. Well, at least not using Bleed as a role playing tool in a transparent and benevolent way.

Being in the same room as everyone else creates an immediacy and awareness that allows Bleed to be used as a tool. Basically, you are able to have feedback from each other, often in non-verbal ways and also have feedback from the environment.

For instance, 1001 Nights encourages that everyone bring food and wine with an Arabian Night feel. I know a GM that likes to play horror games by candlelight. And, taking another mod at Avery Mcdaldno, music is the driving force behind Ribbon Drive. (And it is awesome)

However, when you are playing via Skype, there is distance. Literal distance and, heck, emotional distance as well. Mind you, since I also often have to do other things during a game around the house (toddlers are busy little people), I'm probably guiltier than some here.

Oh, I'm not saying Bleed doesn't happen. I'm sure the usual Bleed feelings of annoyance, anger and confusion take place via Skype. However, trying to use Bleed as a tool isn't easy through Skype.

(Using Bleed as a tool is a weird subject. I remember, when Wraith the Oblivion first came out and someone enthusiastically described it to me as the game of emotional rape. To this day, I think of them as a sick piece of work. That's obviously Bleed being used as a tool in that person's games of Wraith but not in a good way. I don't think it's for nothing that Monsterhearts includes a supplement about respecting and understanding each other's boundaries.)

It's probably not for nothing that the game I play via Skype the most is an old school FASERIP Marvel campaign. It is fun and rewarding but it isn't a system where Bleed is an active part of the mechanics/intentional meta game.

And there are other RPGs that I'd love to try that a lack of Bleed wouldn't be such a big deal. Happy Birthday, Robot, for instance, would be an easy system to play via Skype and the distance wouldn't be a big deal.

And, if the only way I ever get to play Dream Askew is via Skype, by Cthulhu, that's how I'll do it!
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Sat May 23, 2015 6:18 am
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Taking a peek at the contrasting worlds of Looney Pyramids and Decktet

Lowell Kempf
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While musing about surface free games, I found myself comparing Oh Quay with Twin Win, which then led me to comparing the Decktet system with the Icehouse/Looney Pyramid system.

(I have noticed that one blog topic will often cause me to wander off to some other related topic. My blog ends up being less a structured commentary about board games and more of an almost stream-of-consciousness walk through the board game part of my game. Then again, that's one of the reasons why I blog )

I should add that, while I have gotten in some plays of Twin Win over the years, I have yet to play Oh Quay. Decktet takes games that you have already played and does weird twists to them. Or, if you prefer, takes mechanics you thought you knew and performs Decktet Magic to them.

Oh Quay takes Bohnanza's "don't change the order that the cards are dealt", adds two draw piles and requires you to fold the whole shebang in your hand. I doubt I'll be playing any time in the near future (My backlog of games to try is big enough that I am not going to bother pretending) but it looks interesting.

But I'm comparing the Decktet to the Pyramids, not reviewing a game I've never played.

Now, I have long been a fan of Looney Pyramids. I think that Volcano and Zendo are two top tier games. I have played more than my share of Treehouse and Martian Chess and Tic Tac Doh and Pikemen. I will someday actually play a game of Homeworlds and figure out how to play it right.

In other words, I have had a lot of great experiences with the Pyramids. And I feel like I am still just scratching the surface of the system.

But, there aren't that many Pyramid games that you just play with the actual pyramids and nothing else. (Hi, Icetowers) You add boards and cards and tokens and dice and Piece Pack sets. My Icehouse set isn't just a bunch of pyramids. It's more like a kit. It is like the Pyramids create a great jumping off point to make great games.

I realize that one can make a lot of "yes but" arguments for the Pyramid system. You can argue that a lot of games don't require actually using pyramids, Zendo being a prime example. You can argue that being supported by Looney Labs (you know, an actual game company with professional designers) gives it an edge. However, none of those change the bottom line that the Pyramid has given us a lot of good games.

In contrast to the almost ridiculously open world of Pyramids, the Decktet system feels a lot more self contained. Even the games that require more than just the cards often just require the suite tokens. Decktet games feel like, well, Decktet games.

My Decktet exploration has been a lot more limited than my Pyramids exploration. I haven't even played Magnate yet even though I do own the suite tokens and it is said to be the best of Decktet. That said, games like Emu Ranchers and Jacynth have made me want to keep playing them and play more Decktet games.

That, by the way, is no small thing. In comparison, I like the concept of Piece Pack and don't plan on getting rid of the copy I own but I have yet to find anything that really grabs me with Piece Pack, other than maybe Alien City, which is also a Pyramid game.

In fact, creating game systems is clearly not as easy at it looks. I remember being excited about Stone Henge when it came out and being disappointed by it. It felt like too many half baked ideas in he box and not enough fully formed games.

Most game systems that have serious legs (playing cards and dominoes as two very obvious examples) went through a natural evolution and development. In face, the Pyramids started out as just the Icehouse game and evolved into a game system. There are times when I wonder if game systems usually accidentally come into existence.

Which does make the intentional distinctiveness and flexibility of the Decktet more impressive to me.

Of course, when all is said and done between the Pyramids and the Decktet, I don't view it as an either or situation. I feel they are both good, dare I say robust, game systems. They lead to different gaming experiences buy I am glad that I live in world where both exist.
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Thu May 21, 2015 8:43 pm
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Rambling about games without a surface

Lowell Kempf
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Writing about my initial impressions of Dragon Punch made me want to go back to a topic I periodically muse upon, games that don't require any playing surface. Games that you could play while strolling or standing in line or the like. They tend to be subcategories of travel games and micro games.

I also realized that they fall into two fairly distinct camps. Games that you can play without a surface and games that were intentionally designed that way. For instance, there are folks who play the card game War that way, although I'm not sure it makes it any better, even though most poor souls who play War use a table. On the other hand, you have no need to use a table with Proton.

Proton was the first game that really struck me as a game to be payed without a surface. It's actually also a game without only one piece. Looney Labs turned one of those sliding puzzles into a competitive connection game with the stated purpose being to play it while standing in line for roller coasters.

While a copy of Proton has lived in my satchel for years, I'd have to say it's not that great a game. It succeeds very well in its intended goal but it isn't super fun to play. Looney Labs later came up with Twin Win, apparently also designed to be played while standing in line. However, you need a slotted board and you'll probably put the goal cards in your pocket or some such. Oh, I like it much more as a game but I don't think it works so well as a surface free game.

Incidentally, the other game that has lived in my bag for years in Pico 2, which is one of the corner stones of my concept of a micro game and a pretty darn good one too. I'd been thinking that it would be annoying to try and play it surface free when I realized that you could do it with some hacks from Dragon Punch pretty easily. Normally, tej cards you win/score you set aside. However, you could just turn the around so they face your opponent. It's all open information and you can then play standing in line or walking pretty easily.

Another hack I've done is taking a travel Yahtzee game, one of those blue bars that holds the dice in place and let's you lock them, and replaced the dice with Cosmic Wimpout dice. The only annoying part would be keeping track of the score if you were walking. It is awesome for car trips or plane trips or such, though.

Which reminds me of a Othello set I own. The spaces on the board are actually for angle swivels, letting you switch between blank, black and white. Like Proton, it's actually just one piece and could be passed back and forth without fear of pieces falling about.

Whew. If you really, really need to play a game without a surface, be it because you are standing in line or walking or sitting next to each other in beach chairs, there are ways you can do it, not even counting hand gesture games like Rock-Paper-Scissors.

Mind you, I've actually almost never needed one. Maybe while standing in line at a convention, when my mind is already wrapped up in gaming or in line for a popular movie where there's nothing to really see. But most of the time, I and the folks I'm with would rather just talk.
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Wed May 20, 2015 8:24 pm
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Dragon Punch is a tiny little game with some neat design choices

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In my interest in micro games and print and play, it's not too surprising that I came across Dragon Punch, a two player-game that is an homage to old school arcade fighting games like Street Fighter. It's a fast and simple game but what has called this little game to fascinate me is the clever little decisions that were made in the mechanics of the game and the physical design of the cards.

Each player has a deck of six identical cards, as well as one special character card. Each card, including the character card, is some kind of martial arts move. The basic cards have a white end and a red end. You start out with the white ends being up and active.

You each secretly choose a card and reveal it. Some moves block attacks. Faster attacks disrupt slower attacks but slower attacks do more damage. If an attack goes off, the injured player turns over a basic card from white to red. Run out of active white cards and you lose.

However, things aren't quite that simple. The red martial art moves are stronger than the white ones so every time you get hurt, you get more powerful. You flip over cards after you use them so your options get fewer until you play a very weak card to reset your deck. And some moves let you gain initiative that let you go first, even if you are using a slower attack.

Eh, I know I've done a lousy job explaining the game but you can download it for free and read the rules. The core idea is simple. Try and bluff the other guy out with mighty martial arts moves.

There are a lot of clever little touches in Dragon Punch. Have the cards serve as hit points alone in a way that doesn't affect hand size is really neat to me. You don't have to deal with a discard pile or some kind of health point counters. You just turn cards over and you are done. It is so simple and yet it works so well, both as a way to track him points and way to keep the game manageable, particularly if you don't have access to a table.

I also like how the character cards give the game some asymmetry and change things up a bit. I like how the red ends of the cards are stronger so there isn't an innate death spiral in the game.

One of the most interesting mechanical choices in the game, at least in my opinion, is initiative, that under certain circumstances, one player's moves will go off first, period. On the one hand, it gives you more of a long term goal than just out bluffing one card. On the other hand, it allows you to pull off combos, which is definitely part of the genre.

What I don't know about Dragon Punch is if it has legs and serious replay value. Yeah, I know. It's a micro game that is designed to be played in about five minutes and could be played while going for a walk or standing in line. How much depth and replay value can I really ask for?

I have a feeling that Dragon Punch is a game that I will return to and write about some more. I don't know if it will live up to its promise but it has some neat ideas that are fun to think about so I am glad I discovered it.
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Tue May 19, 2015 12:07 am
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Print and Play on Kickstarter - swag or a powerful economic force? I gotta wonder

Lowell Kempf
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One rich source of print and play files I regularly look at is Kickstarter. Well, to be fair, someone else does all the work of looking for print and play files and I just scroll through them (http://boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/149598/kickstarters-pnp-ve...)

I'm not sure how long print and play has been a part of Kickstarter. Looking at the list, it's been going on since at least 2012. And, yes, if you compare the number of games on Kickstarter with the number that have PnP options, they are in the minority. But there still a lot out there, even if you're just looking for free stuff.

They range from limited prototypes with limited or no art to being able to pretty much getting the finished game. You know, all you have to do is make it The idea is to let you test drive a game before you actually plunk money down towards it.

I suspect that what it really does is let folks actually look over a game and scrutinize it. I have to wonder if a lot of folks simply download the files so they can get a feel for what the finished product will look like and play like. Of course, maybe that's just me projecting my own laziness onto other people.

And there are the print and play files that you actually have to back a project to get. I always find that an interesting proposition. What is a fair price for a PDF file? Shipping is no longer part of the equation and you supply the materials and physical labor. However, intellectual property does have value. You are paying for the development of the game, as well as the work that was done to create the file.

If the print and play option costs more than twenty dollars, it passes my threshold entirely. (To be fair, I try to set a twenty dollar threshold in projects I'll back to begin with) However, when the cost of getting the files hits that range, it feels overpriced to me.

Now, I don't know if I'm being unreasonable and unrealistic and cheap when I say that. After all, I don't know all of the costs that were involved and I also know that Kickstarter projects aren't just dreams folks want to come true. They are also created to make a profit.

The list from above includes a link to one publisher's analysis of how much having a print and play version helped sales. In that case, it did increase sales. Sure, as someone who has scientists (like my dad or my wife) for relatives, I know that one example is not clear proof. Still, interesting.

In the end, combing Kickstarter for PnP files makes me an outlier to the overall economic structure of Kickstarter. Sometimes, a PnP has convinced me to back a project. At least once, it convinced me not to. And often, I was satisfied just having the files to study.

It would be interesting to know the overall impact of PnP on Kickstarter.
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Sat May 16, 2015 8:19 pm
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Adventures reminds me while I love Dominion and why I don't own most of it anymore

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Seeing that Dominion Adventures has coming out and feeling no desire to get it spoke volumes to me about how my buying habits have changed. There was a time when I would have automatically snatched up every new Dominion box that came out.

The funny thing is, I still think Dominion is a nifty game. I might not be playing in it at the moment but I don't feel like Dominion was a passing phase that I've grown out of. Yes, when I first learned it in BSW, I played it multiple times a day. When I got my gaming group a hard copy, it got played every time we got together. I'm clearly nowhere near that level of love.

However, Dominion is more than just the first game that took turned the collectable card game experience into the deck building experience. It is one of the purest deck builders out there. The theme is just an excuse for art and card names. The mechanics stand alone from the theme.

For some folks, that would be a huge flaw. While I enjoy a well integrated theme, I believe mechanics can stand in their own and, if they are good enough, are what really will give a game legs for replay value. For me, Dominion has those legs.

The ten kingdom stacks help Dominion's longevity in three ways, in my arrogant opinion. Unlike deck builders with a central row (which I am starting to think is so many that it's the new standard), you can plan out your game plan from the start. Second, it keeps the gameplay varied and different.

Third, it makes expansions manageable. In a lot of games, like Carcassonne or Ascension, expansions make the actual game you are playing bigger. At a certain point, it gets bloated. Since Dominion has a limited number of kingdom stacks, each game is still a manageable size.

(And yes, Dominion isn't unique in those three aspects. Thunderstone and Nightfall, for instance, also have them and benefit from them)

You know, this started out about me writing about how I am not getting the new expansion and I drifted off into why I think Dominion is cool and has staying power. I think that proves that it wasn't a passing phase for me

However, while I think there are some neat ideas in the new expansion, I'm not going to pick it up. In fact, I currently only own the base set of Dominion. When I left Chicago, I gave every box up to Hinterlands to my gaming group. I knew they would get played and I knew they would be missed.

The downside of the expansions, even if they don't bloat gameplay, is that they still take up a lot of storage space. And if or when I find a new group, they will probably already have Dominion.

I also doubt, when my son is old enough to play deck builders (and if he wants to play them rather than shoot hoops), that we would be playing Dominion. We'd probably start off with something like the DC Deck Builder.

In fact, if I buy any boxes again, I'd limit myself to Intrigue and Prosperity. (I do love how Prosperity makes the game go big) Still plenty of gameplay for not too much space.
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Thu May 14, 2015 5:56 pm
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I take a look at why I bought a ticket in the Yardmaster Express

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Yardmaster Express has come up a few times in my blog. I wrote about backing it and getting it. I've compared it to the Best Treehouse Ever and Sush Go. But now that Carrie and I have played a decent number of games of it, I'm prepared to actually talk about what it's like when the rubber meets the road and you actually take it for a spin.

Thematically, Yardmaster Express is a game about building a train out of train cars, trying to get more points than anyone else. The game doesn't even put a dollar sign in front of the points so you can pretend that you are trying to make the most profitable shipment.

Even though it has express in the name, which is usually a signal that a game is a dice game, Yardmaster Express is a card game. The deck is a stack of square cards, each one with two train cars on it. Each card comes in one of five different colors and has a point value of two to four.

Game play is quick and simple. The active player has a hand of cards. They draw a card, play a card and pass the hand on to the next player. Playing the card is just as simple. The front car on a card must either match the color or the number of the last car in their train. As many folks have already pointed out, if you can play Uno, you understand how it works.

The flip side of every card is a wild. You can play it on anything so you can always make a play. That said, the wild cards are low value and break up just about any special goal.

The game ends when everyone has played a set number of cards, determined by the number of players. The total numeric value of your cars is your score, plus whoever has the longest string of cars of the same color gets one point for each of those cars.

On top of that, the game comes with the caboose expansion. These are goal cards that are worth extra points but you need to achieve some sort of building goal, like having all the colors or a specific sequence of cars.

Okay. That was all the boring technical stuff. Is it any fun? Have we enjoyed it? What do we really think?

Short answer, Carrie and I have really enjoyed Yardmaster Express. It is a great game for exhausted, time strapped parents and plays very well for two. But, to be honest, I think it would be a good little game for most folks looking for a game that clocks in at about five minutes.

I had very high hopes for Yardmaster Express when I first saw it and I had hoped that it would turn out to be what I hoped Sushi Go would be. And it is. It gives us a drafting fix in a minimal time. We can play it when we're too tired to really think but it still has interesting decisions.

Part of that comes from the very short playing time. While we now live in a world of express games and micro games, which makes finding a game that plays in five minutes pretty easy, Yardmaster Express does well, particularly for the number of decisions you get to make per minute.

The two factors that make it interesting are restrictions and player interaction.

The Uno restriction of card placement means you just can't take any card, even if it you really want it or you really want to deny the other player that card. It adds a definite level of depth to your decisions and your long term (you know, as long term as a five minute game gets) plans.

Card drafting is already a significant form of player interaction. On top of that, Yardmaster has you competing for the longest chain of cars of the same color and for caboose bonuses. Those bonus points can be surprising crucial.

Carrie and I have taken to sometimes drawing a caboose card each and keeping it hidden until scoring. That's been a fun variant and adds a bit of tension to the game. I don't know how well it would work with more than two players.

I also like how, at the end of the game, you don't just have a collection of cards. You have a complete train sitting in front of you. You can even add the caboose in the end if you win it, since it's the wild color. Ultimately, it doesn't mean a thing. Mechanically, all that matters is numbers and colors but I like trains.

Yardmaster Express isn't a deep game by any stretch the imagination. It isn't the end all be all of micro games, drafting games, and definitely not train games. But it is a fun game that's quick to play and easy to teach. It has enough decisions to make the five minutes of play interesting. I know I really like it because it fits our time strapped schedule but I think it would work well for anyone who enjoys casual games.
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Mon May 11, 2015 7:27 pm
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Oh, wait, I can find some other label for myself :P

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I used to be part of the Cult of the New, as well as what I'd like to think of as a borderline game hoarder. (Other folks would argue about the borderline part) I also was a compulsive game learner. I wanted to learn new games all the time, which fueled my game buying and my game research.

Several life changes later, most of those things are no longer true. Since a lot of those changes are definitively for the better (happy marriage, fatherhood), I got to wonder how honestly happy I was back in those days. But, for a chunk of years, I was "that guy", the one who could answer questions about games and tell friends about a game before they'd buy it.

Recently, I sent some friends the PDF demo version of Dragon Punch since I thought it would be right up their alley. (I think it's a neat little micro game with a lot of clever design choices. I'm quite interested in giving it a spin and seeing it it lives up to its promise)

And I realized that, while I don't make too many Print and Play games, I do spend some time downloading them, researching them and just generally thinking about them. After all, the files don't take up shelf space and most of them are free until you build them and add material costs, all while scratching my collector's urge.

And while my friends don't seek me out for print and play games they should make and play (well, at least not yet), if I find something I think they would enjoy,I'm send it their way.

So, while I might not be "that guy" anymore, apparently I'm some other kind of "that guy"

In some ways, it's a quirkier kind of gaming focus but, unless I compulsively start crafting games, it's a more casual and relaxing focus. Maybe I shouldn't find a new way to pigeon hole myself but I so used to be a specific kind of gamer, it's comforting to know that I still have a definite sense of being a gamer.

Anyway, when my son gets older, if he's interested in games, I'll become an entirely different "that guy"
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Wed May 6, 2015 9:33 pm
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