$32.00
$25.00
$22.00
$35.00

BoardGameGeek News

To submit news, a designer diary, outrageous rumors, or other material, please contact BGG News editor W. Eric Martin via email – wericmartin AT gmail.com

Archive for W. Eric Martin

[1]  Prev «  3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7  Next »  [158]

Recommend
65 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

New Game Round-up: Get Clowns Dirty, Welcome More Thunderbirds, and Refight Dixie: Gettysburg

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
Clown Standoff is a tiny game from designer Ludovic Barbe and publisher Artipia Games that reimplements Barbe's 2013 Pan T'es Mort (although the games seem identical to me, so I'm not sure what's changed, if anything). In any case, here's a rundown of how clowns settle their differences:

Quote:
The circus show went really, really bad, and now the clowns are blaming each other...by throwing pies! And the clowns' code dictates that whoever remains clean the longest wins the argument.

Clown Standoff is separated into two phases. Phase one is a trick-taking phase with simultaneous card selection. Each player has cards 1-6, and four times players each lay down one card; tied cards are eliminated, then the highest card wins. The one exception to this: If a 1 and a 6 have both been played, then the 1 card wins the trick. All winners keep the cards they used to win the tricks, then they move to phase 2.

In Phase 2, six "Pie Throw" cards are in the middle of the table: five "Dodge" cards and one "Hit" card. Starting with whoever has the most cards from phase one, players then take turns as follows: They can draw a card; or they can discard one card from the ones they collected in phase one to shuffle all face-up Pie Throw cards, then draw one; or they can discard cards equal to the number of players who are still in the game to pass their turn to the next player.

If a player draws a Dodge card, nothing happens and the remaining cards move to the next player. If a player draws a Hit card, that player is out of the game; after this, all Pie Throw cards are again shuffled to form a deck, and the player with the most cards from phase one starts a new turn.

The last clown standing wins!

• To double up on the clown coverage, White Goblin Games has an equally quick-playing game from Inon Kohn titled Clown Face for players aged four and up. An overview:

Quote:
The Chief Clown shows three cards with different images to confuse the other clowns. After the third card is shown, all other clowns use the three cards to determine where to put their hands. The first clown placing their hand on the right combination gets all cards.

Score as many cards as you can to win Clown Face. Are you quick enough to become the new Chief Clown, or are you the clown everybody laughs at?

Modiphius Entertainment will launch a Kickstarter campaign for Kung Fu Panda: The Board Game in Q2 2016. Expansions for Matt Leacock's Thunderbirds game from Modiphius are due out in June (Tracy Island), at Gen Con 2016 in August (Above & Beyond), and at Spiel 2016 in October (The Hood).

• In early Q3 2016, Mayfair Games will release English-language versions of Fréderic Moyersoen's Saboteur: Duel and Johannes Schmidauer-König's Die Portale von Molthar, which will be titled Portal of Heroes.

• If Ravensburger were to release Kramer and Kiesling's Memory: Das Brettspiel in English, what would you suggest for a name beyond simply Memory: The Board Game? You can check out the game page for a description or watch this video that BGG recorded at Spielwarenmesse 2016.

Columbia Games plans to fund a second edition of Tom Dalgliesh's Dixie: Gettysburg card game on Kickstarter in the first half of 2016.
Twitter Facebook
20 Comments
Tue Mar 15, 2016 1:00 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
82 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

New Game Round-up: Small Titles from Cool Mini Or Not, New Master Prints from Quined, and Smitten by Schotten Totten

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
• Perhaps in a nod to Steve Jackson Games' long-running practice of publishing an annual stakeholders report, Cool Mini Or Not has published its own "letter to stakeholders for 2015", noting that its revenue in 2015 was $17.2 million ($10 million more than its 2013 revenue). In terms of new game announcements, CMON CEO Chern Ann Ng writes, "We're also making smaller format games a major part of our strategy, with titles like The Grizzled, Play Me, Looterz, Dojo Kun, Unusual Suspects, Potion Explosion, Waka Tanka, Tada and more entering major distribution this year."

BGG's livestream coverage from GAMA Trade Show 2016 has a 45-minute block covering CMON at 12:15 PDT, and the only thing I knew previously about the titles being featured was this: "five games, some small". Now we all know a bit more, in addition to the news of The Grizzled: At Your Orders! coming in 2016.

• Speaking of the bluffing game Waka Tanka, I published a description of the game in Dec. 2015, noting that CMON planned to release an English-language version in Q1 2016, and the comments on that post lit up about the cover image used for the French version of the game from Sweet November (shown at left).

Since then, the cover artwork for the U.S. edition has changed, and designer Bruno Faidutti has written about this change (and artwork changed in Isla Dorada) on his blog. An excerpt:

Quote:
Anyway, a Brazilian publisher decided to bring the game to the US, and was as surprised as me, the illustrator, and the French publisher when told the cover picture of the game was overtly racist. Of course, we first mocked the idea that it was impossible to draw an American Indian who looks like an American Indian, but after some discussions on game forums, it appeared that the issue was, once more, extremely specific. The problem was not the exotic and unrealistic setting, which is common in European games and didn't create any problem so far, but the figure of the old chief in the foreground, which reminded every American of "Cigar stores Indian" – an image I didn't even know about.

For both games, the first steps in the discussion between European (and Brazilians) and Americans were trying to prove that the picture was, or wasn't, racist. Of course, this was vain, since the answer is that the same picture can be racist in the US and not in Europe, or the reverse, depending on what part of the representation of the other has become the accepted sign of racism, and whether the very act of caricature is considered insulting or not.




• To continue the chained discussion, Waka Tanka illustrator David Cochard is also the artist on what will be title #16 in Quined Games' Master Print Series: Papa Paolo by designer Fabrice Vandenbogaerde. I know nothing about the game other than what's shown here, and even this isn't final given that the designer's name isn't on the box.



• And to chain even further, here's the final cover art for Quined's new version of Alain Epron's Vanuatu:



• To end this chain, here are covers of two more new editions being released in 2016: In 2014, IELLO published a French version of Kuro's Seventh Hero under the title Héros à Louer, with this title featuring much more playful fantasy art than what was used for the English-language release from AEG. Now in June 2016, in co-operation with AEG, IELLO will release an English-language of this title as Rent a Hero:



• And at Gen Con 2016 in August, IELLO plans to have its new version of Reiner Knizia's Schotten Totten, featuring Djib's art on this charming cover and the best tagline so far in 2016:

Twitter Facebook
98 Comments
Mon Mar 14, 2016 5:00 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
88 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Links: Researching the Past, Sabotaging the Present, and Pricing Games for a Successful Future

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
Randy Hoyt from Foxtrot Games details why a game's MSRP should be five times the cost of the game and why violating this rule could jeopardize the future of your publishing efforts. An excerpt:

Quote:
If you have been around the publishing side of the board game industry for any time at all, you've probably heard that a game's MSRP should be five times (5×) its cost. Yes, five times! I heard this when I first started, but I couldn't really understand how that could be necessary. ("I'm not making board games to get rich or anything!") I still hear from many Kickstarter project creators who question this multiplier, but I finally have a good enough understanding of all the numbers to explain it. Here's how I would state the advice:

If you plan to sell your game through distribution and if you hope to sell out of your first printing and do a second one, your MSRP must be at least 5× your total landed costs.

In a second post, Hoyt examines this question from the point of view of someone running a Kickstarter campaign to fund the first printing of a design.

• If you want to risk burning hours at a time looking at games of the past — and you might given that you're on BoardGameGeek right now — I suggest you head to The GAmes Research Database (GARD), or even more specifically the publication database, then start checking out the gamenames to see what wacky stuff you can find. The Infants' Cabinet of Fishes, anyone? Credit for this find goes to designer Tony Boydell, who wrote in his BGG blog about an exhibition of vintage board games that subsequently led to this discovery.

• The more I look at sales numbers for games, the more I realize that most of the activity in the market takes place invisibly, far away from the watchful eyes of geeks. As another example of this, I point to Fréderic Moyersoen's Jan. 2016 post (which I've edited slightly) about sales in the Saboteur line:

Quote:
The past year 2015 was amazing for Saboteur. The annual sales have reached 300,000 copies per year, which is an increase of 50%. The total sales are now 1,400,000 copies. Saboteur Duel, the lastest version, is also selling good with 40,000 sold copies. The game is now also available in the Turkish language.

• I'm late to the party on covering this, but U.S. bookstore chain Barnes & Noble will hold "Casual Game Gatherings" each Thursday night in March 2016 in 56 B&N stores to introduce one "light strategy game" to newcomers and established gamers. From the press release: "Barnes & Noble store employees will be running demos for new players and providing a place for fans to play as well. Promotional items for four of the featured games will be given to those that participate in a demo of the featured game (while supplies last)." The remaining games to be featured in March are Splendor (March 17, with a playmat for participants), Codenames (March 24), and Lanterns: The Harvest Festival (March 31, with four promo tiles).

Which stores will be featuring these events? You can see the list in the press release for this event, which you can download from the Splendor: Playmat page.

• Designer Christian Strain suggests how "to put the right type of fun in your game" by detailing the pros and cons of things like the gamble, the sacrifice, the character, and so on. This assumes, of course, that you want to create a game strictly for fun, something Strain doesn't question in his opening lines: "Game designers approach games in their own way. The goal, however, is essentially the same: make something fun." Not necessarily, says I.
Twitter Facebook
17 Comments
Sat Mar 12, 2016 1:00 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
163 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Robo Rally Returning from Hasbro in 2016

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
1995, 2005 & 2016 models
Hasbro has announced that it will release a new version of Richard Garfield's RoboRally on August 1, 2016. (Note that the press release refers to "Robo Rally", and I'm checking on the actual spelling in order to assuage or inflame OCD tendencies.)

In September 2014, Garfield noted that he had revisited the game and "thought seriously about how I would redesign it given 20 additional years of experience". The result?

Quote:
I came up with a new design I really like. To summarize the effects of the changes: the game plays faster, has less downtime, is a bit crazier, and has more option card influx.

He also polled BGGers on how they'd like to experience a new edition of RoboRally. It's not clear from the game description exactly what might have changed from the 1995 or 2005 editions of the game, but I will note that this edition is for 2-6 players and it carries a $40 MSRP. Here's the description from Hasbro:

Quote:
Enter the world of mad machines and dangerous schemes in the Robo Rally board game. Players control their robot with game cards which reveal directions on how the robots can move through the hectic Robo Rally automobile factory. Use strategy to outsmart rival robots while racing towards each checkpoint in your chosen course in numerical order. Beware of factory obstacles such as industrial lasers, gaping pits, and moving conveyer belts that can make or break the race. The first player to reach all of the checkpoints wins and becomes an ultimate race legend.

The Robo Rally game includes 6 double-sided game boards, double-sided start board, 6 robot figures, 6 reboot tokens, 36 checkpoint tokens, plastic priority antenna, 6 checkpoints, 48 plastic energy cubes, 30-second sand timer, 6 robot player mats, 40 upgrade cards, six 20-card programming decks, 6 special programming cards, 74 damage cards, vac tray, label sheet, and game guide.

Oh, and one final note from Hasbro: "We're also excited to announce that Robo Rally will have a presence at the Hasbro booth at SXSW, offering attendees a live demo of the game. If you are planning to attend and would like to view Robo Rally in-person, the game will be available in the SXSW Gaming Hall on Thursday, 3/17 through Saturday, 3/19 from 12pm – 8pm."

Twitter Facebook
64 Comments
Fri Mar 11, 2016 10:08 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
69 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

New Game Round-up: Fighting with Naruto, Flooding with Slime, and Freezing with Zombies

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
Naruto Shippuden: The Board Game from designers Nicolas Badoux and Cyril Marchiol debuted at the Cannes game fair in February 2016, and now Japanime Games has announced a deal with French publisher Yoka Boardgames — the games division of Tsume SA — to release the game in the U.S. in Q2 2016. Here's an overview of the setting and game play:

Quote:
Naruto Shippuden: The Board Game is a cooperative game based on the travels of Naruto and his friends at the beginning of the Naruto: Shippuden series.

The Akatsuki, a criminal ninja organization, are hunting Jinchuriki: humans who are host to tailed beasts, of which Naruto is one. Taking on the roles of Naruto, Sakura, Kakashi, Rock Lee, Sai and Shikamaru from the Hidden Leaf Village, players attempt to stop the Akatsuki from extracting the tailed beasts from their bearers and using them to power their ultimate weapon: The Gedô Mazô.

In more detail, the Akatsuki start at one of the nine villages on the game board, spend at most three turns in that village, then (if they're not defeated there) move to the next village. Each Akatsuki character has its own strengths and weaknesses. The villages are distant from one another, so players can't race from one village to another after them, but must divide their forces to prepare for conflict, encountering unexpected events along the way.

Each player has a character card showing Combat Ability, Chakra Reserve, and Strategy Value, as well as an experience track that allows them to power up over time. Each character also has a deck of fourteen ability cards, some common to each deck but most unique to that character.

Each turn a character takes two actions from move, meditate, or fight. When you fight, you roll dice, hoping for shuriken. You can play cards to increase the number of dice you roll, but you must spend Chakra to play them and both cards and Chakra are limited. The enemy fights back if you don't deal enough damage to it, possibly triggering special powers and additional effects in the process.

Once the Akatsuki arrive at Hidden Leaf Village, players must face Tobi and the Gedô Mazô, with their power being greater for each tailed beast that they stole on their way to this final showdown.

Naruto Shippuden: The Board Game features three levels of play and a large variety of enemies, making each game a unique experience.



Cool Mini Or Not, which took over distribution of the Krosmaster line in Dec. 2015, has announced a March 26, 2016 U.S. street date for the long-awaited Krosmaster Quest.

Cryptozoic Entertainment has announced that a Kickstarter campaign for Ghostbusters: The Board Game II will launch in April 2016. Here's what has been made public about the game so far:

Quote:
Ghostbusters: The Board Game II features an original story by Ghostbusters comics writer Erik Burnham in which the Ghostbusters investigate mood slime that has flooded the city, creating earthquakes and riots in another attempt to bring back Vigo and his minions. In line with the story, the map tiles in the game depict buildings destroyed by earthquakes and fires, as well as collapsed streets that expose sewers infested with slime, tunnels with derailed subway cars, and ghost trains.

This standalone game features new game elements such as Slime Blower Pack Ghostbusters, Ooze entities that can split apart and join back together, allies, new equipment like Ecto Goggles and Portal Destabilizers, and much more.



Plaid Hat Games has announced that preorders for Dead of Winter: The Long Night will open Wednesday March 16, 2016, with those preorders including an exclusive Rich Sommer character along with standee and Crossroads card. Preview articles for the game will start on the PHG website on April 13, 2016.

PHG notes in its press release that some copies of the game might be available at the 2016 Origins Game Fair ahead of those preorders making it to buyers, but the games are coming on separate shipments, so it's not possible at this point in time to know exactly what will be available where first.

Twitter Facebook
7 Comments
Fri Mar 11, 2016 7:00 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
78 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Stronghold Games on Bear Valley, Stellar Conflict, and Working with Publishing Partners

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
• Unlike at Spielwarenmesse, at NY Toy Fair I record only a few videos because (1) I'm on my own, which makes it tougher to record things, (2) publishers at the fair tend to focus on mainstream-friendly games rather than hobby games, and (3) publishers with hobby games were recorded at Spielwarenmesse (such as Asmodee and IELLO) or have nothing more than demo boxes to show off (such as Upper Deck).

That said, I did make plans to meet Stephen Buonocore in order to preview a couple of titles coming from Stronghold Games, starting with Carl Chudyk's Bear Valley, a card game in Stronghold's Pocket Line that seems quite unchudykian at first glance — and possibly even at second glance. I'll need to actually play the thing a few times to know for sure, but that will come later. For now, here's an overview of the game:





Bear Valley is due out in the U.S. in April 2016 at the same time as game #3 in Stronghold's Pocket Line: Stellar Conflict, which is a re-imaging of James Ernest's ye olde Light Speed in the Among the Stars universe, with players building a fleet and fighting a battle in minutes.





• While at NY Toy Fair 2016, I also took the time to ask Buonocore to elaborate on Stronghold's "strategic partnership" with eggertspiele, which was announced in Feb. 2016, and the general practice of how and why publishers partner with one another.

Twitter Facebook
22 Comments
Fri Mar 11, 2016 5:12 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
48 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide

Game Preview: Loot N Run, or Desecrating Pyramids for Fun and Profit

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
Explorers entering a pyramid is an adventure trope that appears over and over again in books, movies, and games, and now designer/publisher Christian Lemay of Masked Scorpion has taken his own crack at the trope in Loot N Run, a quick-playing press-your-luck game in which players try not to get caught awakening the guardians of the pyramid's treasure while looting, then subsequently running.

A sidenote: I can think of few characters or tropes in which people are essentially given a license to steal without being seen as doing something wrong. Sure, pirates steal (and plenty of games feature pirates doing this), but they're pirates and stealing goes with the job description, so it doesn't seem wrong. Explorers "find" treasures abandoned by others from long ago, or they "find" objects that are treasures now only because they're relics from ancient times, and while some may object that they're violating the sanctity of a tomb or temple, that's less of a concern if they're "finding" such things for their personal use instead of for profit. What am I overlooking here?

Twitter Facebook
12 Comments
Thu Mar 10, 2016 10:01 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
83 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

New Game Round-up: Lifting a Flagon with the Engelsteins, Fighting for Power in Tallinn, and Crossing Streets in Japan

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
Stronghold Games has a reputation for publishing serious games, at least in my mind, but the company has also released wackier stuff such as 2013's Going, Going, GONE! With that in mind, here's an overview of The Dragon & Flagon, due out in 2016, from Brian, Geoff, and Sydney Engelstein:

Quote:
The Dragon & Flagon: a tavern world-renowned for its most magical drink, the Dragon Ale. Legend has it that one sip of the Dragon Ale can give a hero wondrous abilities beyond their wildest dreams — but with a bar full of thirsty adventurers and only one mug left, things are bound to go wrong. Prepare your magic and grab your weapon because there's only one true objective in this brawl — and it's not just a drink. Only one can win and emerge with the reputation as the greatest fighter ever seen within the walls of The Dragon & Flagon!

The Dragon & Flagon is a game of chaos and mayhem for 2-8 players. Throw mugs, smash chairs, swing from the chandelier, sip from the legendary Dragon Flagon, and pull the rug out from under your fellow adventurers as you attempt to build up your reputation and win the day!

Play as one of nine unique characters in a 3D tavern environment that can be set up differently every time. Multiple play modes add even more variety.

• Designer Stefan Risthaus has been self-publishing his designs the past few years through OSTIA Spiele, and he's posted info on his 2016 release Tallinn, a quick-playing card game for 2-4 players:

Quote:
Tallinn (Reval, Castrum Danorum) in late 14th century: You try to make the three most powerful forces in the city your allies, namely the Teutonic Knights, the church/monasteries, and the merchants.

Each player starts Tallinn with an identical set of ten cards. These cards have two halves, each with icons representing the influence in one or two of the groups. Every round each player selects one card secretly, touching the side of the card they want to be valid, then all players reveal/place their card simultaneously. The players add their played card to their display, overlapping the cards, so that only the half that they touched when revealing the card is seen. The other half is taken out of play for this game.

Some cards show icons that allow you to collect victory points immediately. When doing so, you compare your total of power of the specific group with each of the other players, scoring 2 points for each player you beat and 1 in case of a tie.

In game end scoring, you compare all symbols with all of your competitors and gain 4 points when having more symbols of a kind, and 2 in case of a tie. Finally, you score 6 points for each face-to-face victory when comparing the symbols on cards you have taken out during the game as part of the city wall.

Scoring during the game weakens your display because the scoring symbol is only on card halves with a single icon of influence, while other card halves show up to three icons.

• How much do I love Japanese games? A lot, as I've mentioned many times already, and part of that love comes from the games seeming to feature a wider array of subject matter than is found in games released in the U.S. and Europe. That diversity might result from the designers usually being the publishers as well, not to mention that they're operating on a small scale, with productions in the dozens or possibly hundreds of copies, which makes it easier to take chances with less mainstream material (not that I know what's mainstream in Japane, mind you).

In any case, I've recently purchased and played Yuo's ButaBabel, which is about pigs building their own towers of Babel. The cards have rock-paper-scissor symbols, and you can play on anyone's discard pile, with everyone playing at the same time. At the end of the game, whoever has the tallest tower wins — except if the tower is three or more cards taller than the next highest tower because if so, God strikes down your tower because you were being too vainglorious. Then you look at the next tallest tower, and so on. Simple and fun, with a playing time of five minutes.

Another release at the Kobe Game Market in Feb. 2016 was Kazumasa Kyoyama's card game Ienomi, which bears this description:

Quote:
In Ienomi, you have a drinking session in someone's home. You fall asleep if you have drunk more than your limit, but you don't know how much it is. You have to estimate your limit by opponents' limits, and score points by pacing your drinking.

The session ends when all players have fallen asleep, and the highest scorer wins the game.

And here's a release that will debut at Tokyo Game Market in May 2016: Gaijin Dash!!, a self-published design from Antoine Bauza and Corentin Lebrat. No, they're not Japanese, but they seem to be operating with that same spirit of "just throw it out there and see what happens":

Quote:
外人 Dash!! (Gaijin Dash!!) is a party game in which players need to cross huge thoroughfares in Japan and avoid oncoming vehicles. Observation, risk-taking, and speed are the three skills you need in order to keep out of the hospital!


Twitter Facebook
20 Comments
Thu Mar 10, 2016 4:38 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
113 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

New Game Round-up: Stefan Feld Consults the Oracle, Aaron Haag Scores an A, and Faidutti and Lang Want to See Your Hands

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
• Game developer/publisher Ralph Bruhn of Hall Games has dropped details of Stefan Feld's next big new release, The Oracle of Delphi, with Bruhn noting that the title is intended for an October 2016 release. Here's the description:

Quote:
"For once, Zeus, Greek god of thunder and sky, is in high spirits. Hence, he decides to offer a generous gift to a worthy mortal and invite him, or her, to his realm, to Olympus. To determine a sufficient candidate, Zeus hosts a competition for his entertainment. Twelve legendary tasks are imposed upon the fearless participants: to erect graceful statues, to raise awe-inspiring sanctuaries, to offer capacious offerings, and to slay the most fearsome monsters. The first participant to master all the posed assignments wins the favor of the father of the gods himself.

Indubitably, you will not pass up this golden opportunity, so you clear your ship and rally your crew to follow on the trails of legendary Odysseus through the dangerous waters of the Aegean. But how could you find the righteous path onward? There is but one who can help you. Visit the mysterious oracle of Delphi and let her answers guide your ways.

In The Oracle of Delphi, the player's ships travel across a large variable game board of hexagonal tiles showing islands and the surrounding waters. Each player aims to reach certain islands to perform the twelve tasks given by Zeus: e.g., to collect offerings of different colors and to deliver them to corresponding temples, or to slay monsters of a specific type (and color), all of which can be discovered on the islands.

In order to execute these color-dependent actions, you are given three colored dice each turn, the so-called "oracle dice". Rolling the dice (at the start of the turn) is equivalent to consulting the oracle, whereas the results represent her answers. The answers determine which actions you will be able to take, but you will always have three actions per turn. However, a slight divergence from your fate is often possible.

In addition to the oracle, you can request support from the gods and you can acquire favor tokens, companions, and other special abilities that will help you win the race against other competitors.


• I recall linking to a fascinating post by Bruno Faidutti from 2014 in which he reported on how gamer behavior changed based on the method in which players took actions — then I looked through old BGGN posts and apparently I only thought that I linked to it. Sigh.

In short, Faidutti was working on a prisoner's dilemma-style game with Eric M. Lang. Each turn, a pair of players would have two cards placed in front of them, then these players would simultaneously choose Mine, One, or All, that is, the two cards in front of me, any single card, or all the cards on the table. Faidutti ran tests of the game in which players made their choice with dials, with cards, and with their fists, and he noted the following about the latter method:

Quote:
Theoretically, this system is equivalent to the two former ones. When playing, however, the feeling is very different, and it seems that the results are slightly more aggressive, with more wars and less peace. Maybe holding one's arm makes one aggressive, maybe the requirement to play fast, without hesitation, makes us less careful? Anyway, it's the same game, but it plays a bit differently.

That game, titled Neeed! at one point, will be released in 2016 by Lui-même as Dolores, with the 2-4 player pirates trying to collect seven types of treasure, but scoring at the end of the game only for the types that they have the most of and the least of.

I played the prototype once with Faidutti and others at Spiel, and as is often the case with his games, you're trying to climb inside someone else's head to figure out what best to do. The gameplay is simple and intuitive, yet that doesn't make the choices easy. Sometimes you'll both want war, so that you butt heads and no one gets anything, but then you realize that making peace would mess up that player's plans — yet they might make peace, too...

• Didn't I just cover a Peer Sylvester title yesterday? Yes, I did, but here's another one coming from him: North American Railways, a 3-5 player card game that Spielworxx expects to release in July 2016. The available info so far is brief: "Players become directors of up to five different companies and try to acquire a majority of shares. In the end, the player with the most cash wins." Spielworxx notes that this title will be released in an edition of 500-600 copies.

The rest of Spielworxx's line-up for 2016 is Solarius Mission from Andreas Odendahl and Mike Keller in July, Sands of Time from Jeff Warrender in October, and Reformation (which is a working title) from Jason Matthews and Chris Leonhard in October.

• A bit of information is available for Argentum Verlag's late 2016 release: Saami from Aaron Haag, and that has to be a record for the number of "a"s in one phrase. Here's all I know so far: "Saami is a semi-cooperative game in which players need to eliminate threats while trying to improve their own personal position in the game."

Non-final cover artwork
Twitter Facebook
35 Comments
Wed Mar 9, 2016 5:17 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
81 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

New Game Round-up: Becoming a True Messiah, Opening Someone's Head, and Noshing on Marie Antoinette's Leftovers

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
flag msg tools
admin
designer
Osprey Games debuted in 2015 with The King Is Dead, a new version of Peer Sylvester's King of Siam, and in August 2016 it will release the original Peer Sylvester title Let Them Eat Cake, which features an enchanting cover image by Lauren Dawson. So much said with this one image!

Here's an overview of this 3-6 player game:

Quote:
"Liberty! Equality! Eclairs!" The glorious revolution has done away with tyranny! Now you and your friends make up the Revolutionary Committee, overseeing justice throughout the land. Still, now that the queen's gone, it would be a shame to let all that cake go to waste...

Become the first among equals by amassing honor! Become happy by amassing cake! Send your friends' pawns to the guillotine! First to forty cakes wins!

Let Them Eat Cake is a game of committees, coercion, and cake. Elect your friends to positions of power in the hope that they look on your patronage favorably — or denounce them as enemies of the revolution. Alliances and betrayal are all fair game as you try to amass as much cake as you can before the revolution collapses.

Cool Mini Or Not has acquired worldwide rights to Sheriff of Nottingham from Brazilian publisher Galápagos Jogos, noting that it will continue to work with existing partners for continued availability of the game in English, German, Italian, Chinese, Spanish, Portuguese and Polish. In a press release announcing the deal, Bryan Pope from Arcane Wonders, which publishes the game in English, said, "This new relationship will provide even better support of the game and fans will see some great expansions in the future."

Craig Stern's True Messiah from Sinister Design has a compelling setting and equally fantastic art, both of which recall the Heresy CCG of the mid-1990s (at least from what I can recall of it). Here's what's going on in the game:

Quote:
It is the near future; Earth. Years ago, scientists successfully constructed the Belief Engine, a machine that warps reality based on peoples' strongly held beliefs. The machine was turned on for testing, but it proved too sensitive: widespread belief in the depravity of man and fears of social collapse suddenly took on the full force of objective fact, and science skepticism rendered the Engine's creators helpless to intervene. Without resort to a shared external reality, civilization crumbled like a sand castle in the tide.

From the ruins have now arisen cults led by charismatic, messianic figures possessed of seemingly divine powers derived from the still-functioning Engine. You are one such a figure — the true one, the Messiah. It is God's will that you build temples and marshal followers, then mold their beliefs to perform miracles and destroy your rivals. They'll be doing the same, but don't worry – God is on your side...

Players combat one another on the 8x8 game board, build temples, loot the temples of others, and acquire cards through a market to build up personalized decks. Someone wins this 2-4 player game by slaying an enemy messiah, by reducing an enemy to fewer than four followers, by capturing an enemy's holy city, or by reducing an enemy to fewer than eight miracle cards. Stern plans to Kickstart True Messiah in late 2016 or early 2017.



• In the category of "it makes perfect sense when you think about it, but I'm still having a hard time believing it's real" comes H.E.A.D. Hunters from designers Ben Cichoski and Danny Mandel and publisher Gut Shot Games. Here's what I'm talking about:

Quote:
H.E.A.D. Hunters is an expandable card-driven miniatures game in which everything that one player needs is stored inside the head of a collectable toy.

In more detail, in this tabletop game for two or more players, each player controls their own Hero of Every Age & Dimension (H.E.A.D.) Hunter. Each toy features its own deck of cards, unique starting terrain and buildings, measuring string, and combat dice to attack and defend against other Hunters as it moves around the table for position and opportunity. When the game is over, all the components fit back inside the toy's head.

Gut Shot Games plans to Kickstarter this game/toy line in the latter half of 2016. The really disturbing thing about this project is the missing period in the graphic for H.E.A.D. Hunters; ideally they can fund that period and put it in its proper place.

Twitter Facebook
27 Comments
Tue Mar 8, 2016 5:39 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls

[1]  Prev «  3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7  Next »  [158]

Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.