$3.00

Fun City Gaming

This is a weekly report of our Tuesday night gaming sessions in Chelsea (Manhattan).

Archive for J. R. Tracy

1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5  Next »  [22]

Recommend
69 
 Thumb up
4.50
 tip
 Hide

AAR 13 September 2016 - Captain Sonar, B1704, Next War: India vs Pakistan, NetRunner, Secret Hitler, Up Front, Junk Art

J. R. Tracy
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
We had thirteen players for playtesting, real-time ASW action, and a little something from Dan VIII's collection of odds and ends.

Bill, Smitch, Jim, Manfred, Mitch, Dan VIII, and Tenno opted for real-time Captain Sonar. With the odd number, one team was short-handed, so celebrated radio operator Mitch "Sparks" Stein joined Dan and Tenno on the three-man crew. Both teams neglected to name their subs, a grievous oversight that has been forwarded to the Discipline Committee for review.

Checking the plot

As expected, this was a very different experience from last week's turn-based game. They surfaced much more often to clear damage, relying on the cover of chaos to protect them. It was interesting to see how differently the two teams operated. At one point the big team seemed almost dead in the water while the other crew banged out move after move. The small crew ultimately triumphed - I don't know if was due to better efficiency, an inherent advantage of a small team, or pure dumb luck. Fun session for all, though.

The same group followed up with Secret Hitler. I don't know how all the roles split, but Bill-as-Hitler was elected to office with the help of Chancellor Jim.

Co-conspirators

Nate sat down to teach Dave Android: Netrunner. Dave took the corporate side, using Jinteki for all seven games. Natus ran with Shaper for the first five, before switching to Anarch. Dave learned quite a bit, taking two games, and expanded our pool of potential NR players.

Anarchvillain

Meanwhile, Hawkeye introduced Rich to Up Front, with the traditional Meeting of Patrols. Hawkeye took the dogfaces against Rich's squareheads. Rich picked up on the key tactics early, as Hawkeye seemed to be perpetually under wire. They went the distance, ending in a draw after a very cagey match. Rich is sold on the game and looking for more.

Another convert

Scott and I opened with a playtest of Charles Vasey's B1704, applying the W1815 system to the Battle of Blenheim. The Duke of Marlborough leads an Anglo-Allied army against the Franco-Bavarian force of the Duc de Tallard. The French and Bavarians await the Allied attack behind the Nebel (a marsh-bound stream), relying on fortified hamlets and counterpunching cavalry to withstand the assault.

Tallard's batteries speak

For those unfamiliar with W1815, each side is represented by a number of formation cards, each with its own CRT. Combat results are casualties, morale hits, or both, affecting either (and occasionally both) sides depending on the roll. The map is a schematic of the battlefield, and serves to hold the division blocks that represent the manpower of a given formation. Commanders typically have one-use special powers. Victory is attained by driving the enemy's casualty track to zero, or by breaking their morale. Morale hits reduce army morale, and casualties trigger morale checks.

Historically Marlborough demonstrated against the flanks to deny support to the French center, before launching his own assault against the heart of Tallard's line. In game terms, Colonel Cutts leads his brigade against Blenheim on the Allied left, with the possibility of 'locking' French reserves into the fight for the town. Eugene, facing Marsin and the town of Lutzingen on the right, doesn't have such a direct effect. However, if his units aren't activated at least once every three turns, Marsin can release troops to help Tallard in the center.

The Nebel ran red

Eugene and Marlborough each have an infantry and cavalry card, but must first deploy pontoons before engaging the French/Bavarian line. In the meantime, the French heavy batteries pound Allied morale as they slog across the swampy approach. Once the pontoons are down, the French batteries are overrun and Marlborough and Eugene assault Oberglau and Lutzingen respectively. When a town is taken, the relevant formation cards are flipped with the Allies becoming more effective and the French/Bavarians less so. At this point the Franco-Bavarians are usually on the ropes, but Allied morale may be wavering; can Marlborough finish off Tallard before his army loses the will to continue?

We played four games, switching sides. In our opener, Cutts failed spectacularly before Blenheim but Eugene blasted his way into Lutzingen on his first attempt and never looked back. In the second, Marlborough grabbed Oberglau and settled into a long attritional battle with the French failing morale first. In the third, Clérambault got a division over to Tallard, allowing him to last long enough to destroy the Duke's foot. The Elector of Bavaria was flattened and both sides were reeling but the Duke's cavalry carried the day, forcing the clinching rout test. The last was our sole French win - Cutts seduced both French reserve divisions into Blenheim, but the French batteries scored two morale hits in the meantime. Casualties were surprisingly light but the Allied morale steadily sank until they finally failed a test two boxes short of routing outright.

Marsin wears thin

I enjoyed B1704, and feel it reflects Blenheim to the extent possible in such a small package. We had one blowout but the other three were quite close games. The onus is on the Allies to dictate the flow, but Tallard has choices with respect to reserves and the timing of counterattacks. The typical +1 die roll bonus for a counterattack is always tempting, but the eligible formation may be just one casualty away from elimination, which might stay your hand. I like the tension once Marlborough is across the Nebel - the Gens d'Armes charge home again and again, hoping to force a fatal rout test before Tallard is swept away. A fun and satisfying little game, worthy of its ancestor.

The Allies lose their mojo

We followed up with the short Kashmir scenario from Next War: India-Pakistan, using the basic rules. Scott was Pakistan, trying to wrest Kashmir away from my Indians, aided by Chinese airmobile forces. The system is a highly polished expression of classic wargaming ideas - sticky (but not locking) zones of control, odds based combat, troop quality, reserve and exploitation movement, and so on. The sequence of play varies depending on initiative - if one side has the upper hand, the pace really picks up, with a given unit potentially moving and fighting three times in a single turn.

Unit class is very important in the Next War system, interacting with terrain for both movement and combat. Perched on the western slopes of the Himalayas, the scenario's battle area has a broad range of terrain, mostly suited to mountain troops and light infantry. There are a couple valleys in which armor can can get its war on, including the Vale of Kashmir. Air support in the basic game is straightforward, with attack helicopters and fast movers providing die roll modifiers, though only after surviving anti-air defenses. Both sides have airmobile infantry, very useful but again subject to anti-air.

On top of the world

In this scenario both sides collect VPs for eliminating enemy units, but the bulk of the scoring is for terrain objectives - five hexes worth five VPs each to whoever holds them at the end of the four turn game. My troops started near the borders, with three of the five rear-area objectives unprotected. Scott opened by attempting a coup de main against vacant Anantnag with a pair of PRC airmobile brigades. He had an 80% chance of success, but my ever-vigilant air defense forces sent the Chinese packing. The rest of his forces rolled up to my border outposts and proceeded to bash their way into the disputed province.

I garrisoned all the objectives at my first opportunity, and moved to reinforce the borders. I relied on my frontier outposts to slow the assault on Baramula, leaving my best unit to defend the city itself, protected by high mountains and a stream. In the north, Scott pieced together a large multi-hex attack against the mountain division facing Taobat, inflicting casualties but failing to dislodge the defenders. I reinforced, and a second attack saw a similar result. He abandoned that front and threw everything into the Baramula operation.

The Chinese lend a hand

The Baramula fight was a grind, as I traded bodies for time. Scott had the initiative for the first two turns, but it shifted over to me at the end. He needed to crack my line quickly, and called for a Chinese air assault to cut my retreat paths. The Hips got through this time, but my mountain troops held on. With just one turn to go and initiative flipping to me, we saw no chance for a breakthrough and called it.

This is a tidy little scenario, limited in options as you'd expect for its size, but well suited to teaching the system. I liked the dynamic turn sequence and the unit class distinctions. The use of supporting assets is clean but the air defense component feels a little elaborate. Still, it's quite a jump to the involved air and detection systems of the advanced game. We'll save those for another day, but I think the appeal is strong and we will return to this. All three titles hold interest but I reckon we'll stick with India-Pakistan for the time being.

Noted authority on mountain warfare

Dan VIII reached into his bag of tricks for a suitable nightcap and emerged with Junk Art. This is a dexterity/stacking game similar to Bausack/Sac Noir. The basic stacking game is shaped by card play; City cards set the victory conditions for the current game, and Junk Art cards determine what kind of pieces you place next. Depending on the city, you might need the tallest structure, the most pieces, or simply be the last player standing. Tenno proved to have the steadiest hand, graciously accepting the Junk Art crown to close out the evening.

Towering achievements
Twitter Facebook
4 Comments
Tue Sep 20, 2016 1:27 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
45 
 Thumb up
1.50
 tip
 Hide

AAR 6 September 2016 - Captain Sonar, Fortress Europa, Dragon & Flagon

J. R. Tracy
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
We had nine players this past Tuesday for three fresh and much-anticipated titles.

We opened with the heralded Captain Sonar, a game of team-based submarine combat. A screen separates the two crews as they arm torpedoes, plot their course, and track the movements of the opposition. Normally I'd give you a light overview of the rules, but for a change of pace I offer instead Shut Up and Sit Down's informative and entertaining review:



Unfortunately we had an odd number of players, so I sat out. Dave captained one sub with Dan VIII as Engineer and Mitch as the Radioman, while Smitch captained the other, with Engineer Hawkeye and Radioman Rich for crewmates. We opted for for a turn-base game instead of real time for our first attempt. Both teams picked suitably warlike names and sailed out to do battle.

The battling bosuns of Boaty McBoatface

Both boats powered up their drones first, and then their sonars. A well-timed sonar activation by S. S. Minnow dramatically narrowed their search area, and they quickly pinpointed the opposition. A torpedo soon followed for a direct hit.

A fearless crew

Up to that point Boaty McBoatface was about half a sector off on their own plot, but the torpedo launch tightened things up considerably and they replied with a direct hit of their own. However, Boaty's snake-like course limited their options (you cannot cross your previous path), and Minnow was able to surface and complete much-needed repairs without fear of Boaty closing for another shot. All patched up, Minnow submerged, survived a near miss, and put Boaty McBoatface on the bottom with a second direct hit.

One ping only

All hands enjoyed themselves; I think a turned-based starter game was a good intro, as a couple things still got lost in the confusion. A drone or two may have been launched with damaged components, for instance, and a sloppy plot opened the door to controversy. The enthusiasm is there for a full real-time session in the next few weeks.

Neither silent nor deep

Scott and Bill tried Compass' new Festung Europa: The Campaign for Western Europe, 1943-1945, with Scott taking the Germans to Bill's Wallies. After some initial confusion over what an Invasion card allowed, Bill stormed ashore in Sicily, and chased the Axis up the boot until Italy surrendered. Things did not go as well on the Channel coast, however, as the Allies struggled to get a foothold in France. They managed to get through six turns of the ten turn campaign, calling when it looked out of reach for the good guys.

Ganging up

The players found the game okay in concept, but weak in execution. The map is as bad as rumored, ugly and occasionally confusing. They were fighting the rulebook much of the time as well. Good play depends on understanding card interactions, but that's true for any CDG - Bill suffered more than Scott on this front because of demand for the Allies to set the pace. I think they liked it better than Barbarossa to Berlin, and it will get another look as we have several interested players. A solid design, sadly undermined by poor presentation.

Jammed up in Normandy

I joined the Sonar crews for The Dragon & Flagon, a rollicking bar room brawl in the spirit of the old Yaquinto Swashbuckler. Instead of swordsmen, each player-character is a particular class, such as Barbarian, Paladin, Monk, etc, though a Swashbuckler is included in a nod to its roots.

Each player has a deck of eighteen action cards. Most of these are common to everyone (Move, Dash, Riposte and so on) but each character has a few cards unique to his or her class. For instance, the Paladin can blast nearby players with his Radiance, while the Swashbuckler Dazes opponents by waving his fancy hat. Every player has also has a unique Dragon card, that can only be used if you get your hands on the Dragon Flagon that starts the game in the center of the tavern. These are very high powered moves, well worth making a play for the Flagon.

Roguish behavior

Game play is a mix of Robo Rally and Thebes(!) - you plot two actions in advance by placing the respective cards on your play mat. All the character tokens are placed in a cup and drawn one at a time, with that player playing his current action and adding another to his queue. Actions have a time value (this is the Thebes bit) - once completed, your token is placed that many spaces down the turn track, marking when you'll again be eligible to act. Robust moves carry a high time penalty, leaving you vulnerable if your nearby opponents plot more nimble actions.

Combat is resolved via an exchange of Reputation (everyone starts with twenty points). If I hit you with a chair, I collect three points off you. Some actions, such as Slash or Yank Rug, can collect Reputation from multiple opponents. An especially heavy blow Dazes your opponent, forcing him to plot an extra action. If you're feeling bold, you can hop up on a table and make a Boast - this increases the Reputation value of any actions you perform, but also increases the score of your opponents when they attack you!

Table dancing

Our game opened with Paladin Dave, Barbarian Rich, and Wizard me all jumping up on tables. Dave then made a Boast, just in time to catch my boots with the side of his face as I swung across on a chandelier. Dave staggered forward a couple spaces to be met by Rich, swinging in from the other direction! I settled in and started launching ranged attacks around the room, deploying LazerCat, my familiar, in the center of the tavern. LazerCat acts as another point of origin for my ranged spells, a pretty nifty asset. Unfortunately, noted ailurophobe Mitch (Rogue) pegged LazerCat with a mug, forcing me to burn another action redeploying her.

Dave, Hawkeye (Druid) and Rich stood off to one side, bouncing mugs and chairs off one another from pointblank range, stepping off the rug every time Mitch lined up to give it a yank. Smitch (Swashbuckler) edged toward the Flagon, absorbing Arc Lightning and Ice blasts from me and my feline in the process. Dan VIII (Monk) seemed uninterested in the proceedings beyond throwing the occasional mug. I was leading at this point, dishing out a lot of punishment without getting hit myself.

Just resting their eyes

Despite my efforts, Smitch got his hands on the Dragon Flagon, and we got a taste of his killer Dragon card. Called the Blade Waltz, it allowed him to attack and move continuously as long as he obeyed the pattern on the card and each move led to a fresh attack against a new opponent. He set it up perfectly, hitting all six of us in a single turn. I handed him the yellow jersey, but it was soon stained red.

We were over three quarters through the game when Shaolin Dan got involved. He tapped Mitch with the Touch of Death, good for seven points, then hopped on a table and slammed into Smitch and myself. By the time we returned to our feet Dan had skipped away out of range, surprisingly agile for a man his size. We gave chase but failed to catch him before the City Guard arrived to shut down the party. Dan's patient sandbagging paid off, giving him a win with 30 Rep to my 27, with Smitch in third at 24.

LazerCat sitting pretty

I thought it was a lot of fun, and very clean for a tactical combat game. If you're a fan of the older game, you will not be disappointed. We opted for the longer game but I suggest playing the shorter length first time out (and not just because I would've won had we done so whistle ). In addition to the free for all, you can play teams, and a given player can control multiple characters if you wish. As with the original, you have the option to play a boarding action instead of a tavern fight. Highly recommended if you're in the mood for an old fashioned donnybrook.
Twitter Facebook
6 Comments
Tue Sep 13, 2016 1:48 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
51 
 Thumb up
1.25
 tip
 Hide

AAR 30 August 2016 - Cataclysm: A Second World War, Secret Hitler, No Man's Land: Trench Warfare 1914-1918, Arena: Roma II, Ra

J. R. Tracy
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
We had a baker's dozen last week for a slew of old and new titles.

Cataclysm wrapped up with an action packed final turn. I took over Japan and Italy from Mark as the war advanced into 1945. With no resources or industrial capacity, Campoverdi's Germany was reeling. Italy held her home territory along with the Balkans, but Dutch and Hawkeye were on the doorstep with Commonwealth, French, and American might. Jim's USSR was in the best position - he sat in Berlin and faced thin Japanese opposition in Mongolia and China, while Japan herself was contending with an ever-stronger USN.

Storming the boot

Outnumbered and outgunned, the Axis still put up a good fight. A relentless barrage of sixes threw back several Allied attacks against Italy, while the IJN performed heroic feats against the US in the Ryukyus and the Sea of Japan. Japanese land forces fared worse, however, getting rolled by a surging Red Army. The Axis VP lead was quickly overwhelmed and the Soviets pulled in front.

Uncle Joe piles on

Unfortunately I couldn't roll a six *every* time so the Western Allies eventually took Sicily and Lombardy. Italy failed her Collapse roll and I was forced to offer an Armistice. The greedy Allies refused, hoping to capture Rome and its two VPs. Out east, the Soviet steamroller slowed to a halt but the IJN carrier force slipped beneath the waves, leaving only surface assets to face the Fifth Fleet. Hawkeye turned his attention to the Home Islands, failing repeated invasion attempts.

Redeploying to the CBI

Three of four Crisis chits were drawn - the fourth would end the game. The Axis clawed back into a tie when Campo's erotic sonnets were well received in Bucharest, flipping Romania from Soviet client to German lackey. We even had a shot at pulling into the lead but a Japanese attempt to retake Manchuria and an Italian counterattack into Sicily were both rebuffed. The Soviets managed one more offensive before the final Crisis chit emerged, using it to retake Romania. The Crisis chit followed, ending the game with a Soviet victory. The final tally was USSR 11, Axis 9, Western Allies 8.

Reaping the whirlwind

It was an exciting final turn, due largely to smokin' hot Italian and Japanese combat dice. The dominant Soviet position forced the Western Allies to declare war, but they just couldn't come to grips with the Reds. It was gratifying to see the Axis still had a glimmer of hope at the end, at least something that made it worth playing on. At this point the basic systems are proven, and all that remains is confirming the powers are reasonably balanced. I think Scott and Bill are pretty comfortable with where things stand. Just a few more preorders to go before this enters the GMT production pipeline.

The new face of Europe

Jon Kay, visiting from Toronto, taught Rich "Sergeant Schultz" Schulte Arena: Roma II. They had a great, drawn-out game, nearly draining the VP pool before blowing holes in each others' tableaus to build it up again. Both then managed to deploy double Forums, with Schultz winning the VP race for a narrow win.

Walking through the rules

Renaud dropped by with No Man's Land: Trench Warfare 1914-1918 in hand, sitting down with Herr Fuchs. This is a tactical-level WWI game with detailed treatment of artillery, rules for support weapons, and date-dependent tweaks that reflect the evolution of combat over the course of the war. It also has a neat élan rule - the attacker draws an élan chit every turn, which affects either Initiative, Close Combat, or Rallying. In the early going, these effects are positive, but as the game progresses, they become neutral and even negative, reflecting fatigue.

The assault begins

They chose a 1916 scenario with Renaud's poilus on the attack. Both sides scored VPs for inflicting casualties, while Renaud also scored for occupying German trenches, winning the game outright if he reached the Support line. David defended up front, stuffing the French on the German left but gradually giving ground on the right. Renaud advanced enough on that flank to make up for his casualties, scoring a win for the French. Renaud seems to be on a bit of a WWI kick of late - maybe his designer brain is dreaming Great War dreams.

Through the wire

Smitch, Dave, Manfred, Jon, and Schultz turned to Ra while they waited for Cataclysm to end. Dave and Schultz battled over the pharaoh lead, and after a catastrophe-ridden first epoch everyone enjoyed the rich auctions of the end game. Jon (playing for the first time) twigged to the parabolic nature of monument scoring, and cultivated an impressive sculpture garden. This was enough to take home the win, not a bad achievement for his first visit to Dave's dojo.

In the catbird seat

After some early departures, ten of us sat down to Secret Hitler, a recent Kickstarter production. This is yet another twist on Mafia/Werewolf/The Resistance etc. Players are divided into two teams, the Liberals versus the Fascists of Weimar Germany. One Fascist is Hitler - he does not know the identity of the the other Fascists. The other Fascists all know each other and the identity of Hitler. Liberals are in the dark about everyone.

Don't let this happen to *your* country

One player is President, and nominates a Chancellor. Via open voting with 'Ja' and 'Nein' cards, the choice is ratified or defeated. Assuming the Chancellor is elected, the President then draws three random Policies, examines them in secret, bins one, and passes the other two to his Chancellor, who enacts one and bins the other. Discards are secret. If the Chancellor choice is defeated, the President's seat rotates and the process repeats. Three defeats in a row means you draw a random Policy off the top of the deck and enact it, which is dangerous for the Liberals since Fascist Policies outnumber Liberal by a little more than 2:1.

If the Liberals enact five Policies, they win; if the Fascists enact six, they win instead. However, if Hitler is elected Chancellor after the Fascists have three or more Policies in place, they get an autowin. Also, each Fascist Policy comes with a little authoritarian bonus - for the first two, the current President may examine someone's party affiliation (but will not be able to discover whether that person is Hitler). For the fourth and fifth Policies, the President can assassinate a player (if Hitler is killed this way the Liberals autowin). Also, after the Fascists reach five Policies, the Chancellor may propose a veto of all current proposals, which succeeds if the President agrees. This prevents a Liberal/Liberal pairing from getting boxed in by three Fascist policies.

Springtime for Hitler

In all, very simple, but a lot of fun. We played two games. In the first, I killed an innocent Bill who was mystifyingly coy about his Policy choices as Chancellor. Later, a charismatic Austrian war veteran assumed office with promises of a better future. Our Hitler proved to be Manfred, in a shameful display of typecasting.

In our second game, I was a Fascist and we jumped out to an early lead. However, we were on the ropes going into the endgame, with five Policies on the board against four Liberal Policies. Two Fascists were dead and the other two clearly identified. My Fascist colleague Smitch was President, and took a chance nominating Liberal Manfred as Chancellor. Before the Liberals recognized the trap, they ratified Smitch's choice. Smitch smiled, handed Manfred two Fascist Policies, politely declined his offer of a veto, and ushered the Fascists into power. It was a clever play dependent on drawing at least two Fascist policies, but the odds were in his favor.

Get yer ja-ja's out

I like the Policy construct and the gamesmanship it encourages. A Liberal President might nominate a shady Chancellor and hand him a Policy of each flavor in order to clarify his faction. The risk of enacting a Fascist policy might well be a price worth paying to establish someone's identity. Keeping an eye on voting patterns can clarify political leanings as well, but there is ample opportunity to out-think yourself. Half the table was at sea during the first game, but the second was very sharp and focused.

I don't know if it has the legs of The Resistance, but this looks good for several sessions before growing stale. Like most of the secret-identity breed, it has the virtue of accommodating a range of players, from five to ten I believe. Good art, with an agitprop flair that doesn't exactly fit but is evocative nonetheless. PnP files are available here on BGG, but I reckon production copies should be hitting stores soon.
Twitter Facebook
8 Comments
Tue Sep 6, 2016 1:15 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
46 
 Thumb up
2.25
 tip
 Hide

AAR 16 August 2016 - Cataclysm: A Second World War, Mutant Chronicles - The Siege of the Citadel

J. R. Tracy
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
We gathered a dozen gamers to continue our playtest and also sample some vintage Borg.

After simmering in the Far East for a few turns, the war is now truly global in our game of Cataclysm. France seized the lightly held Ruhr while Comrade Campagna led the Soviets into the war by invading Poland and Romania. British troops fought their way into Berlin before being thrown back, only to be replaced by the Russians advancing from the east. Germany took Poland from the south to pinch off the spearhead and retrieve the situation, but even Goebbels is struggling to put a positive spin on recent developments.

Red Army rolling

Meanwhile, Japan has the China situation under control, having chased Mao's columns into the hills. The Soviets are getting involved, however, and the US Navy is applying pressure from the sea, briefly cutting off the Home Islands and remaining a threat to mainland operations.

Tensions mount

Germany is hanging on by a thread, Italy is threatened, and Japan itself may see an invasion. The tide has definitely turned but with just one turn remaining (1945-46) the Allies still have their work cut out for them. Good exciting game so far!

Trouble offshore

With a reboot looming Natus wanted to get the venerable Mutant Chronicles: Siege of the Citadel on the table. Mitch, Tenno, Eliot, and I signed up for the ride. This is a science fiction themed dungeon crawl designed by Richard Borg. Players control corporate factions battling the evil Dark Legion, which is bent on exterminating humanity. One player controls the Dark Legion, while everyone else controls a pair of fighters representing their faction.

Packing them in

The scenario structure offers a campaign format, with factions increasing in ability from game to game. The Dark Legion role is randomly assigned each scenario, but that player still earns points toward his own faction for use in later games. Each scenario has a specific objective for the humans - completing the mission earns credits, good for buying toys in the coming scenarios. In addition, killing bad guys racks up Promotion Points - these advance your faction as a whole, adding bonus actions and improving your combat abilities.

The basic bones are very straightforward - each trooper gets two actions a turn, which can be used to move and/or fight. Fighting may be either Close Combat or Ranged, with different values for each depending on your weapons. There are three sets of combat dice (white, red, black) with increasing effectiveness. Units are rated for armor and hit points - you must exceed the armor rating by an amount equal to the target's hit points in order to kill it. When attacked, humans deflect the first hit and get a saving roll against the second. Dark Legion figures need to be overcome in one combat (hits don't carry over) while human troopers accumulate hits and die after suffering their fifth.

The Dark Lord checks his notes

Turn order is by chit draw. On his turn, the Dark Legion player first randomly draws an Event (all bad as far as I could tell), reveals a Force card (placing reinforcements on the map) and conducts actions with all of his minions. The randomized turn order can be a real pain for the humans, as the rules prohibit moving or shooting through friendlies, and the corridors of death tend to get crowded as chokepoints abound.

Tenno was selected to run the bad guys in our opening scenario. We humans had to enter the map, kill 20 Dark Legion minions, and escape (in four turns). Seemed simple enough. Tenno drew a heavy Event right off the bat, placing eight Legionnaires and a couple Centurions on the map. Tenno sized up the situation and placed them as far from our entrance as possible. He proceeded to move every figure he had toward the same area, so one tile was teeming with bad guys. We managed to pick off a few strays but had to wade into this snakepit if we had any hope of success. Mitch was armed with a grenade launcher that had the potential to inflict devastating damage in a crowded evironment, but he had terrible luck with it. The rest of us scored a handful of kills but as time expired our body count was four short of victory.

Enemies ahead and behind

Eliot was the Dark Lord for our second scenario. This one found us pursued by Ezoghoul (known variously as Esophagus or the Demogorgon during our game), a PED-powered killing machine that enjoys three actions a turn and a ton of attack dice. We had to flee through a serpentine maze, cutting through the usual collection of riffraff before exiting the far end, all while trying to stay a step ahead of the boss. This really did not go well at all, as poor chit draws saw us get in each others' way and we struggled to kill the goons clogging the corridors. Natus and Tenno both used special abilities to teleport ahead and at least exit a couple guys, but for the human team as a whole it was a dismal failure. Between his top performance in the first scenario and the havoc he wrought with Esophagus, Eliot was the overall winner with Tenno coming in second.

Laughing in the face of danger

Siege of the Citadel was a fun throwback experience. It is very much a product of its time, with a bright primary-color palette and an early-Warhammer graphics vibe. However, you can detect the DNA of a lot of recent titles in its genes, such as tiered combat dice, enemies whose power escalates as you level up, and the semi-cooperative scenario/campaign scheme. Games like Descent and Space Cadets: Away Missions owe much to Siege of the Citadel just as it owes something to Space Hulk and others before it. It holds up well as a game, but I can see room for improvement, just in terms of physical presentation. The tiles feel very crowded, and two faction colors match a couple flavors of villains, making it harder to read the board than it should be. That said, Borg's steady design hand is evident and I can easily imagine investing the time to play a full ten scenario campaign. I will keep an eye out for the new version, likely a Kickstarter campaign later this year or early next.
Twitter Facebook
5 Comments
Mon Aug 29, 2016 1:30 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
61 
 Thumb up
2.25
 tip
 Hide

AAR 9 August 2016 - Cataclysm, Victory or Death: The Peloponnesian War, Concordia, Alhambra, Quadropolis

J. R. Tracy
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
We packed in fifteen players for a playtest, a couple new titles, and some popular Euros.

Scott and Bill opened a fresh test of Cataclysm: A Second World War, with Campoverdi running Germany, Dutch the UK, Hawkeye France/USA, Mark Japan/Italy, and Jim the USSR.

Campo's unique brand of nationalistic lunacy proved strangely attractive to the people of Europe, as he peacefully built an ever-expanding power base under the noses of the dithering Allies. 'Dithering' in this case meant perpetually missing mobilization rolls. Mark's Italians also carved out a chunk of the Balkans for themselves. When the munitions plants finally came on line, Dutch opened the war with aggressive action in the West, setting the stage for the next session.

Kumbaya

In the Far East, Mark turned toward China, consuming half the country thanks to ample air and armor support. Uncle Joe looked on with concern but has yet to act. The US is far from entering the war and the other Western powers have other matters to attend to, so we'll see how much progress the Emperor can make before the rest of the table responds. We'll be returning to this in the coming weeks.

Playing the China card

Dr. Rob, Natus, Dave, and Tenno sat down to Concordia. It was Tenno's first try of the game so everyone else felt they had a chance. They were wrong.

Concordiat

Dr. Rob was urgently summoned to a Scarsdale kurultai to select the new khan of Westchester, so the remaining three followed up with Alhambra. If three players could not stop Tenno, what hope did two have?

A fistful of dinar

GorGor, Herr Fuchs, Smitch, and I tried the new Cake or Death: The Peloponnesian War, from the folks who brought us Quartermaster General. Like QMG, this is a light card-driven strategic game, with the various powers split into opposing sides. Here, Athens and the Delian League are opposed by Sparta and Corinth.

Build cards are used to build hoplites and triremes, and Battle cards attack your enemies. Status cards are played in front of you for on-going capabilities known to all. You can also play Prepare cards, which are played face down for future use, as well as Events, which have immediate impact. In a change from QMG, you can lay down a Prepare card after your regular action, by discarding a card. You may also discard two cards in order to dive into your deck to retrieve a Build or Battle card. Also new are Bribe tokens - you can buy these via discards or obtain them through Events. Bribe tokens have several applications, but the most common use is providing a 'friendly unit' for the purpose of placing builds or tracing supply. They disappear the turn after they are placed, but can save your empire in their brief life on board.

Rich Corinthian pleather

In the first game I had Athens, allied with Herr Fuchs, while Smitch led Sparta and GorGor headed Corinth. I had my fleet out to sea in no time but just as quickly the Spartans were on my doorstep. Corinthian air strikes devastated my draw deck, forcing me discard several Prepare cards vital to the defense of Athens. I didn't help by discarding a Build Hoplite at the outset, not realizing how rare they are. Herr Fuchs fought valiant naval battles west of the Peloponnese, but when Athens fell our fate was sealed. I founded a new city in Messenia, too late to have any real impact. The running score was deceptively close thanks to overseas colonies but once the end-of-game bonuses were counted up we were buried.

Sparta marches north

For our second game we rotated powers, so I had Sparta to David's Corinth, while GorGor ran Athens to Smitch's Delian League. This was a very tight game, as Herr Fuchs and I teamed up to grind through the Athenian defenses. There was plenty of action on the periphery too, around the Dodecanese and in Sicily. As the end game approached, the Oligarchs were set to finally capture Athens...when GorGor played Peace of Nicias, prohibiting sea or land battles for the final turn. Our plans dashed, the Demos triumphed.

Meddling diplomats

I love Cake or Death's forbear, but this is a much deeper game. In QMG choices are usually obvious, or at most you're choosing between two cards. The draw is the speed with which the board develops and the ebb and flow between theaters as you try to win here to pressure them there. VoD by contrast demands longer-term planning, tempting you to risk your short term position in order to build out for actions two or three turns in the future. You can score a lot of points overseas, for instance, but you need the Prepare cards in place beforehand, along with a few Bribe tokens. Your capital might fall in the meantime unless you've done something to buttress your defenses. The two partners in each coalition have complementary powers as well - leaning on the capabilities of your ally leverages your own.

As you come to know the various decks, you have a better sense of your peculiar vulnerabilities. This can be a burden as well as a boon, as Sparta wonders whether Athens might seize Argos while he's off grabbing Syracuse. Knowing the cards also allows the luxury of the planning mentioned above - you will hold certain cards back now, knowing they'll be much more effective in combination with cards yet to come. Of course you may well find yourself disappointed when an enemy Event forces you to discard those very same cards from your draw deck.

Thumbs up all around - this is a solid four player game with several paths to victory for both coalitions. Great tension, fast playing, and a lot better history than I expected. Highly recommended.

Oligarchs in Attica

We rounded out the evening with Smitch's fresh copy of Quadropolis. This is a construction-themed set-building abstract that appears to owe more than a little to the computer Sim City series.

Each player has a mat of 20 spaces in a 4x5 grid. The spaces are aggregated into five four-space groups, and each space also has a value from one to five. Play consists of four rounds of four turns each during which players take turns selecting building tiles from a common pool, arrayed in a 5x5 grid on the Construction Site.

Tough choices

To select a tile you must use an Architect - Architects are numbered from one to five (there are four of each value in a four player game). You place your Architect at the edge of the of the Construction Site, count in a number of spaces equal to the Architect's value, and grab that building. You can't place an Architect on top of another, so as play proceeds some tiles will be locked out as the Architect supply dwindles and edge spaces are consumed. You must place your new tile on your mat in a space that matches your Architect's value, further constraining your choices.

There are several types of buildings - Tower Blocks, Office Towers, Harbors, Factories, Shops, Parks, Public Services, and Monuments. These all score in various ways, with bonuses for concentration, distribution, proximity to other types, etc. Some provide resources (Inhabitants and/or Energy), while others demand either or both to function. A building will only score if you have the resources required to run it, and excess unused resources carry a VP penalty. After four rounds, scores are tallied.

Quadrophenia

We had a good time with this, finding it surprisingly interactive as we identified and thwarted one another's strategies and placed our Architects in a manner calculated to inflict the greatest pain. My Office Tower/Harbor strategy was rocking along nicely until everyone made a point of denying me the easy pickings. GorGor went with a more balanced city, adding Monuments and Parks to the mix. This was good enough to edge me 95-87, with Smitch and Herr Fuchs following in the 60s. Neat little game, worth another trip to the table.
Twitter Facebook
17 Comments
Mon Aug 22, 2016 2:10 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
57 
 Thumb up
1.25
 tip
 Hide

AAR 2 August 2016 - Tin Goose, Reluctant Enemies, Conflict of Heroes: Guadalcanal, Codenames

J. R. Tracy
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Back from DonCon, nine of us unwound with some Euros, wargames, and wordplay.

Jim and Smitch wrapped up Reluctant Enemies as Operation Exporter reached a successful conclusion. As the Vichy feared, the breach of the Awali line unhinged the mountain position. Before Jim could respond, the Staffordshire Yeomanry slipped behind his hill fighters and put them out of supply. Relief attempts failed; Jim was last seen affixing the Cross of Lorraine to his kepi, asking what the fuss was all about.

Yeoman's work

Dutch and Scott broke out Academy's new Conflict of Heroes: Guadalcanal – The Pacific 1942. Scott took the IJA to Dutch's jarheads. As with ASL, CoH tweaks the rules a bit to account for Japanese tactics and motivation. Here the IJA player accrues 'Bushido points' for various actions, such as suffering casualties in close combat. These Bushido points are effectively CAPs, so the Japanese are rewarded for aggressive play with increased capability.

The Solomons and Syria

I didn't get to watch much of their play but in the first game Scott was able to throw back the Marines, and they were just getting started with the second when we wrapped up for the evening. I think Dutch was a little frustrated by the unique Japanese idiosyncrasies - it's hard to close with an enemy who might grow stronger with each loss. Cautious optimism on the part of both players - I hope they have enough enthusiasm to give it a try with me in the next month or two.

Crossing the Matanikau

Mitch, Bill, Mark, Maynard, and I all tried Tin Goose, a post-DonCon acquisition. Each player is running an airline in the golden age of aviation. You need to buy aircraft, expand your service, manage your cash flow, and keep an eye on fuel costs and safety.

Each airline starts with a couple Ford Trimotors. Over the course of your turn you play a card, usually an aircraft put up for auction. New models are rated for range, safety, and fuel efficiency. Other cards are events such as strikes, fuel crises, and crashes. After the card is resolved, the player performs actions such as expand his routes, borrow money, or improve labor relations.

Boise bound

Route expansion depends on the type of planes you have - short-range planes fly to adjacent cities, medium range to adjacent regions, and long range planes to any city on the board. Each new city increases your income (unless someone beat you to it) and you get cash bonuses for reaching 'demand' cities. You can also fly to international destinations that are worth beaucoup VPs at game end. Each plane purchase grants you two plane pieces, a precious commodity. You can skimp a bit on safety and efficiency by using 'extenders' instead of your available planes for short routes. You save a plane piece, but increase the fuel consumption and hazard rating of your airline.

I pursued an aggressive expansion policy, snapping up firetraps with little regard for passenger safety in order to lock down the east coast. I figured I'd weather the calamities when they came, but boy did they come. Mitch, Mark, and Maynard took special delight in invoking labor strikes, which made sense given they spent precious actions lining the pockets of their union reps. Bill had a knack for invoking a fuel crisis every time I tapped my bank account for a shiny new Lockheed Molotov. My commitment to providing affordable convenience for the fare-paying masses translated into a lead position on the hazard table, good for severe hits to my income with each new crash.

Proudly serving the Northeast Corridor

VPs are scored for money in hand, income x 10, large cities served, and overseas destinations. You also lose VPs for any bonds you have outstanding. I had a great raw score but my three bonds sank me to the bottom of the pack. Mark, Mitch, and Maynard were all closely ranked, but Bill came out on top, thanks to prudent purchases that left him immune to most of the negative events. At DonCon I heard this described as "Just like Air Baron!" but also heard "It's nothing like Air Baron!". Having never played Air Baron I can't comment either way, but I found it to be a challenging network-builder, with a slightly odd auction structure and lots of chances to jam up your neighbors. Good interaction, several ways to win (I think - there is some debate on this), and a reasonable playing time.

Smitch, Maynard, Hawkeye, and I closed out the evening with Codenames, with Smitch and I paired up. We played to best of three. Smitch and I took the first game, and lost the second when I hit the bomb on a desperate stretch. The third game was a hoot. I was the clue-giver and we had two words remaining to just one for Hawkeye and Maynard. I said "hooves" as my clue. Smitch immediately picked 'calves' for one correct guess, but was a little lost looking for the second. He mulled over 'pan' and was moving on when Maynard said, "Wait, doesn't the mythological Pan have hooves?" Smitch said, "Uh, thanks!" and picked 'pan' for the win. I'd call it a 1.5-1.5 draw due to the inadvertent assist.

Match point

This continues to be a hit - great nightcap, terrific family game, and the rare choice that accommodates a broad range of headcounts. I enjoy the insights you get into how people think, and how *differently* people think. Often humbling, occasionally inspiring, but always a blast.
Twitter Facebook
2 Comments
Tue Aug 16, 2016 1:30 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
53 
 Thumb up
6.25
 tip
 Hide

AAR 19 July 2016 - The Great War w/Tanks Expansion, Reluctant Enemies, Advanced Squad Leader, Pericles

J. R. Tracy
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
We had ten gamers over the week before DonCon, for a playtest and some action in both world wars.

Mark's Pericles: The Peloponnesian Wars is entering the developmental home stretch, so he unveiled the latest iteration for another run-through. Campo and Scott manned the Athenian side of the table against Smitch and Mitch as the Lacedaemonians. Much has changed since this first hit the table but the four player/two team tension remains intact. Sparta triumphed with Mitch the overall winner.

Buffing and polishing

The players immediately commenced with our traditional post-playtest beat-down of the designer, but Mark as usual more than held his own. The discussion continued into the elevator, onto the street, through the shared cab home, and on to email the following day. It's down to tweaks at this point, with concerns about hand management and how to reel in your hometown rival foremost. Lots of good thoughts put forward, and of course Mark has his own adjustments in mind. I expect this to be wrapped up shortly pending the reports of other groups.

Focused effort

Dutch and Renaud sat down to The Great War with the Tanks expansion. Renaud led the British with three tanks on the attack, supported by infantry. The monsters lumbered forward, absorbing most of Renaud's commands but breaching the German trench line and attracting the full attention of the defense. Renaud had to take off so Drew stepped in to inherit a precarious situation. His tanks were bogged, making them vulnerable to Dutch's counterblows. One by one they went down, and Drew was left without enough oomph to carry on the attack. Dutch eventually bagged the medals he needed for the win.

Confronting the beast

The expansion looks *terrific* but Dutch felt the tanks disrupted the elegance of the base game without a commensurate payoff. However, Renaud and Drew were both first-timers, so I have to believe that was a factor as well. Regardless, it does look great and I have a few Whippets and A7Vs itching for action.

Drew assumes command

Last up, Jon and I paired up for some ASL, picking Kazina Klash from Bounding Fire's recent Poland in Flames. It's 5 September 1939, and my plucky Poles had to defend a pair of buildings with 6.5 squads and six tanks, holding on to one while keeping at least one of my AFVs alive and mobile. Jon was attacking with nine first line squads supported by five light panzers and three armored cars. I had a choice of taking either an 81mm mortar or a heavy machine gun (I chose the mortar) while Jon had the option of taking either a pair of 37mm ATGs or a 75mm infantry gun along with some extra infantry and an MMG. He ended up with the INF gun and the extra bodies. The scenario is only five turns long and takes up just a half board, so we expected it to be pretty sparky from the get-go.

A quiet fall day

I deployed with my armor and most of my infantry in the woods near my board edge. I stacked my ATR-armed hero with a squad in H7, a wooded hex atop a mid-map hill, to offer the impression of a leader-led HMG. More infantry guarded my extreme right flank, and a failure of imagination led me to place my 37mm ATG in H0 on my left flank, where it could cover the approaches to the victory buildings. My mortar was in C7 where it could hit the edge of the G9 woods mass as well as the F6 building. A pre-setup die roll determined my reinforcements (one Vickers Ejw and a squad) would enter on turn two. Ideally I could just hide the tank to keep it alive but I suspected I would need it in action.

Jon opened with his armor, blowing sDs to cover the unhooking of his infantry gun, sighting down the road from Q8. Sure enough, a PzI rolled up on my 'HMG' team, taking an ATR round to the drive sprocket before killing off my 149 with the help of its armored mates. Long range MG fire kept Jon from probing too far down my left, keeping my ATG safe for the time being.

Trading shots

The midgame saw heavy exchange of fire between the woods and the hills, where Jon made several hulldown rolls. With single digit TK numbers, lots of small targets, and terrain, kills were hard-earned. My ATG claimed two tanks, the PzI was a mission kill (immobilized and out of LOS), and a PzII was stuck in the woods on my right flank. However, the 75mm INF gun took out two tanks and a hulldown PzII in K5 popped two more, and the F6 building fell quickly. We both bad luck with our armament, as an armored car lost its tube, as did my mortar, while my ATG crew succumbed to small arms fire.

Jon's flanking panzer finally pulled loose from the woods and knocked out the Vickers on my right in C8. My reinforcing tank was in B0, while I had a TKS with a broken MA in the D4 victory building. Jon still had three mobile AFVs, two with functioning armament. My brave infantry were up to the task, however, killing the two panzers in close combat while my left-flank Vickers took out the PSW. Unfortunately my TKS then went down to the infantry gun. Jon threw everything at the second victory building, but a succession of breaks and pins along with a wall of residual kept him at bay. He also bounced HE, ATR, and MG rounds off my Vickers, allowing me to hang on for the win.

One more rush

This was a surprising amount of fun in a small package. Interesting OoB mix for both sides, though the Polish defense is pretty static once set up. There are a few different defensive options and a couple good channels of attack. I think this is ideal for a weeknight game, and a good option for someone moving up the AFV learning curve in ASL. PiF has very nice production values, no surprise given Bounding Fire's last three efforts. I look forward to checking out the rest of the set.
Twitter Facebook
13 Comments
Mon Aug 15, 2016 1:45 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
61 
 Thumb up
3.25
 tip
 Hide

AAR 12 July 2016 - Scythe, The Great War, Reluctant Enemies, 1989, Roll for the Galaxy

J. R. Tracy
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
We had eleven players a couple weeks ago to fire up a brand new title alongside new and old favorites.

Scott, Hawkeye, and Campoverdi finally got the sexy and seductive Scythe on the table. Scott handled the Rusviet Union, Hawkeye ran the Saxony Empire, and Campo led the brave Republic of Polania.

Polonia expands

Like many empire-builders, there is a lot to do here, and as Campo said, he and Hawkeye couldn't help but "try every sweet in the shop". Meanwhile Scott advanced with steely-eyed Rusviet resolve. He was better prepared when he met Campo for a decisive battle in the central factory. Scott triumphed and Polania fell back. Scott was able to close out the game with a win before Hawkeye's war machine could really get rolling.

The Emperor picks his production

The response was positive all around - it doesn't quite live up to the hype, but with this level of hype that's not surprising. Interaction seemed sparse at the outset, but that may just be due to the learning process. Rules-wise, no big issues. Each power has special abilities that demand some study to maximize or counter, so there is still much to discover. We'll see a lot more of this in the near future.

Securing the factory

Dave sat down to teach 1989: Dawn of Freedom to Bill. As usual, Dave proved a good teacher and Bill a good pupil, as Bill pulled out a win as the Democrats. Still enjoying this a great deal but Wir sind das Volk! lurks in the wings for a turn at the table.

Democracy in action

Reluctant Enemies continues with the Allied attack starting to gel on all three fronts. Somehow beleaguered Layforce managed to survive, compromising the Awali line and forcing Jim to fall back along the coast. Both sides are reinforcing the mountain front, but Jim had to redirect forces to relieve Baraq, after an Allied raid threatened the depot there.

Relieving Layforce

The Vichy are stretched, and the failure to eliminate the Commandos not only undermines the coastal defense, it exposes a flank of the mountain position as well. We'll see if Jim can recover the situation when they return to the table.

Pressure in the mountains

Natus, Dutch, Mark, and I tried The Great War, splitting up with Dutch and I taking the Tommies to Mark and Nate as the Germans. For our first scenario, we were actually Canadians, attempting to secure Hill 145, the highest point of Vimy Ridge. Our forces heavily outnumbered the defending Germans, but we would need every body. Victory medals were awarded for eliminating enemy units and occupying the opposing trench, and the hill itself was worth two to whoever controlled it. Also, the defender may discard a Recon card on their turn to pick up a medal. The winner was the first to reach eight medals.

Awaiting the whistle

We took heavy losses but soon pushed the Germans off the ridge and penetrated the enemy trench line. Things were looking good but Nate and Mark steadily picked off our one- and two-figure units, and crept back into the game, even moving up to deny us the ridge. We got the worst of the artillery exchanges and found ourselves on the knife-edge of defeat. We had to secure the high ground and hold it through the beginning of our next turn to win. We managed to push the Germans far enough away to guarantee a hard-fought 8-7 victory.

The loneliest squarehead on the Western Front

For our second game, Mark and Natus took the fight to us, leading the German counterattack at Loos in 1915. They made very good use of artillery, first driving us from our trenches and then catching us out in the open. On our left they quickly reached our lines, eliminated our forward units, and fought off our attempt to drive them back across No Man's Land. We scraped together a couple medals thanks to unit eliminations and discards, but once the Germans penetrated the trenches on our right, it was all over, with the Germans winning by a comfortable margin.

It's up...and it's good!

I really like the adjustments TGW makes to the Commands & Colors chassis. The addition of HQ points and tactics cards adds more decision-making to each turn, and the ability of the defense to collect medals via discards adds a much-needed clock to pressure the attacker. Artillery is an expensive but useful hammer (note to self: never get caught in the open again), the sort of thing you need to crack the formidable cover trenches provide. The WWI theme is strong. This jumps the queue to become one of my favorite C&C titles; looking forward to trying the Tanks expansion.

King vs Queen

Bill, Dave, Hawkeye, Campo, and Scott closed things out with Roll for the Galaxy. Hawkeye sank into a trance-like state before transforming into an amorphous mass; he emerged victorious forty minutes later with no clear recollection of what transpired. Fortunately for all, he quickly recovered his usual humanoid form.

Starfaring
Twitter Facebook
7 Comments
Mon Aug 8, 2016 1:31 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
48 
 Thumb up
2.25
 tip
 Hide

AAR 5 July 2016 - Liberty or Death, Blood Rage, The Great War, Lawn Wars

J. R. Tracy
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
We had eleven players for a belated Independence Day gaming session a couple weeks ago.

Manfred, Dan VIII, Dan IX, Scott, and Bill went with Blood Rage, using the fifth player expansion. Bill and Manfred flexed their Loki skills while the other players corralled the special characters and got them into play.

Beneath Odin's Gallows

Scott and Dan VIII vied for the lead going into the final round, but Dan VIII's diversified strategy won out. Dan IX held Odin's Throne but it wasn't enough to bring him up from the back of the pack. Fun game for all, and it's good to see it works well with five.

Plenty of blood but no rage

Dutch and Natus tackled The Great War, where Richard Borg takes the Commands & Colors concept to WWI. In addition to Command cards, TGW features Combat cards. These offer bonus capabilities and are fueled by HQ points, akin to the Lore of BattleLore.

First day of the Somme

They played two games, with Natus leading the British against Dutch's Deutsche. Dutch skunked Nate twice, 6-0 6-0, but the games were closer than the score. Nate was in good position to crack the German line with the Whistles & Bugles card, essentially a 'line' order that allows all connected units to move forward. He paired it up with an excellent Combat card, only to see Dutch pull the plug on the whole enterprise with Lost Messenger. This reduced Nate's orders to a single unit, which felt awfully lonely as it left its mates behind. That sort of thing combined with lethal Krupp-forged dice did in the Tommies, but the game got high marks and will return soon.

Across deadly ground

Manfred, Dan, and Dan tried the latest version of Dan VIII's Lawn Wars, a game about the darker side of competitive grass cutting. Players maneuver their Toros around their yards, avoiding trees and sheds, and contending with the distractions and occasional rocks hurled their way by their neighbors. Manfred triumphed in an exercise of Teutonic efficiency. Dan still has a few tweaks before his baby is in peak Spiel des Jahres form.

Ooh Crikey It's...

Campoverdi, Smitch, Hawkeye, and myself settled into Liberty or Death: The American Insurrection. Campo had the Indians, Smitch the British, and Hawkeye the French, leaving the Patriots to me. This was my first play and I believe Hawkeye was a rookie as well, while Campo and Smitch were on their second try. We went for the medium scenario, covering four campaign seasons.

Thanks, we'll take it from here

As the Patriots, my victory criteria depended on the relative political control of the colonies (support for/opposition to the British government) as well as the differential between Indian Villages and Patriot Forts. I started relatively strong in the north, with a good force accompanying Washington in New York, and scattered forces elsewhere. My early plan was to steadily reinforce Washington while developing a board presence in the south, while beseeching my French counterpart to enter the war.

Campo built up his villages, lending a hand to the British for an occasional combat boost. Smitch gathered strength in New York so Washington skedaddled to Massachusetts before the hammer dropped. My Southern campaign was bumping along without too much drama but the British slowly devoured the coastal cities. By the time the foot-dragging French finally joined the party only Savannah was still in the hands of the rebellion.

Saratoga party

Liberty got a boost with a powerful Allied combo - Hawkeye played a Command plus a Special Action, leaving the Morgan's Rifles event open for me. Washington led his force into New York, spanked Howe, and picked off a couple more Redcoats thanks to the free Partisan action. That actually helped Hawkeye more than myself, as the casualty differential is a French victory condition. However, the British stranglehold on the coast stifled exploitation opportunities.

Hawkeye couldn't move against the British without my help, and since political control was a shared victory condition, I wasn't motivated to assist. Instead, I used my Brilliant Stroke card to send Washington over the Adirondacks to engage in a campaign of ethic cleansing, burning four villages to the ground. The deck was dwindling and the fourth Winter card loomed. The Iroquois Killer had no more villages within reach, so he reluctantly joined the French in North Carolina - if I couldn't win, I hoped at least my ally could pull it out. Hawkeye used my troops to good effect, pushing the casualty differential further in his favor. Campo was poised to rebound just as the clock ran out, denying him a chance to vie for the lead.

Winter is coming

We toted up the score, and as expected no one won outright. Hawkeye worked out to a +2 differential, while Campo and I were even, and Smitch was at -2. I enjoyed the gameplay and found the choices challenging. The events seemed to lean more toward one-turn 'super actions' as opposed to the persistent effects I've seen in modern-era COIN games. We suppressed them as much as possible - my crack at Morgan's Rifles was just a fluke of timing combined with an oversight by Smitch.

My strongest reservation is with respect to the Indians. It didn't feel quite right going after them instead of liberating the coastal cities and colonies, but that was where the victory conditions told me to go. I think Campo played a solid game as the Indians but I don't think it was the most exciting - maybe he can chip in with his own thoughts. The game itself is beautiful, and the factions feel balanced. I will give it another shot, perhaps as the Indians to get a feel for them myself.
Twitter Facebook
16 Comments
Tue Jul 19, 2016 3:43 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
57 
 Thumb up
2.52
 tip
 Hide

AAR 28 June 2016 - Reluctant Enemies, Concordia, Fire in the Lake, 7 Wonders - Duel, The Very Best Men: CIA v KBG

J. R. Tracy
United States
New York
New York
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
We had a dozen players to wrap up June with wargames, cardgames, COIN, and a euro.

Renaud dropped by with his new espionage-themed cardgame, The Very Best Men: CIA v KBG. Dr. Rob, Dave, and Herr Fuchs jumped in to give it a try. The setting is the 50s-60s era Cold War, with appropriately evocative card art. Game play looks like a mix of Atlantic Euchre trick-taking seasoned with a dash of CattleCar Galactica/The Resistance style double-agent shenanigans.

Explaining the concept

Players take turns assuming the role of Section Chief, nominating a mission for the group to complete. The mission lists a set of skills that must be contributed, and players donate cards face down into the center to meet the requirements. Double agents can submit useless cards, or cards that make the mission even more difficult. Play continues until the mission deck is drained; whoever had the most successful missions as Section Chief wins, though if a double agent created enough mischief, he will win instead.

Padding the HR file

They had a lot of fun in a couple games, with Dr. Rob winning one as a turncoat. They had a long debrief, discussing scoring issues, how to handle a double agent 'reveal', etc. Renaud took notes and revamped the rules a bit. The cards look great, a testimony to the kind of production support you can get these days even for playtest materials. I will have a deck and Renaud's revised rules at DonCon, if anyone is interested in giving it a try.

Suspicions aroused

Jim and Smitch settled in to Reluctant Enemies, with Jim taking the Vichy to Smitch's Commonwealth. The channeling terrain dictates three avenues of attack - along the coast, through the Golan, and across the eastern plateau. After a couple turns Smitch feels behind schedule, but the Free French have appeared and now Jim faces the recurring puzzle of how to distribute his resources against the various threats.

Commandos on the coast

This is the second time I've watched RE in action, and it looks like a good intro for the OCS system. There's some airpower, but not so much that it dominates the action, and both sides face logistical issues that guide strategy and create vulnerabilities. I'm a fan of the campaign, which is off the beaten path but has a lot of interesting terrain and funky units on both sides. They should return to the theater in a couple weeks' time.

Stalled in the center

Mitch and I paired up for 7 Wonders: Duel, a nifty two-player implementation of some of the ideas from the original. Duel follows the same construction of tableau-building over three Ages, using resources and coins to purchases cards and build Wonders.

Rather than the pass-the-trash drafting method of the original, players draft off a lattice of cards whose form changes with each Age. Purchasing resources is a little different as well - you always have access to any resource, but the cost depends on how many your opponent holds. It's typically two coins per item above what you can supply off your own tableau, but for every example your opponent holds in his tableau, you must pay an additional coin. So, if I need three Stone and only produce one, but my opponent has one in his tableau, I must pay six coins ((2+1)x2). As with the original, some Yellow cards reduce this cost.

A man of science

In 7 Wonders you can ignore Military without suffering too much, especially if one or both neighbors are like-minded. With Duel, that choice might be fatal. Each play of a Military card advances the Conflict pawn down the Rivalry track toward your opponent's city; if it reaches his city, you win automatically. You also pick up tokens along the way which hit your opponent's pocketbook. Failing outright victory, you get a few VPs if the Rivalry pawn is on the far side of neutral. You can also auto-win via Science, by collecting six of the seven different symbols. Also, for each pair of the same symbol you pick up, you may select a Progress token - these are cool little rule-bending powers that can boost your efficiency.

The last major change is to the Wonders themselves. Each player has four (drafted from twelve), which are each completed with a single action. As with the original, some provide cash, some add abilities, some do both. In a nice touch, only seven may be built - if you've each built three, whoever builds his fourth denies his opponent the chance to build his last Wonder. Hey, the clue is in the name after all.

Mitch has never played 7 Wonders, so while I was focusing on the differences, he was focusing on the game itself. I fell into a Monument-heavy strategy, supplemented by Yellow cards to reduce my resource burden. Mitch grabbed some science early, and collected the first pair. We perused the Progress tokens for the first time, and discovered one allowed you to ignore two resources when building a Wonder. Mitch hadn't even started his Wonders, so he jumped on it. This was a great move - essentially picking up eight free resources in one action. We sparred on the Rivalry track without any decisive progress either way, so it came down to the final tally. My Yellows and Blues dominated those categories, but Mitch had the upper hand in Wonders and Science, edging me 56-53 for the win.

Monumental

I think this is a great little game, as does Mitch, so no need to experience the original before enjoying Duel. The interaction is very high, thanks to the drafting lattice. The lattice is built up by overlapping cards row by row, and a card is only available if fully exposed. Therefore, depending on your pick, you might be able to fork your opponent into exposing a good card if he wants to continue to develop a particular strategy. The result is a rich decision set, allowing for surprising depth in a fast-playing game. A solid addition to the collection.

Natus, Hawkeye, Bill, and Campoverdi headed to Southeast Asia with Fire in the Lake. Natus was the NVA to Campo's Victor Charlie, while Bill ran the US and Hawkeye the RVN. Nate, playing red for the second COIN game in a row, saw his North Vietnamese fare no better than his Romans. Good event play helped the socialist cause, but he struggled for board position, as Bill's relentless air campaign kept his head down and stifled the Trail. Hawkeye in turn was frustrated by the RVN's inability to improve its position in the face of looming Coup cards - no opportunity for Patronage so no chance to boost his own scoring. This really hurt when the second Coup came out soon after the first - Campo was well placed to take advantage, tucking a win into his black footie pajamas before slipping into the night.

The rare 3v1 COIN title

Mitch and I joined Dave, Herr Fuchs, and Renaud for Concordia. I'd played it once before but it was new to everyone else. We went with the base map (Mediterranean and surrounding provinces).

I opened by chasing brick cities, and was fortunate to luck into the Mason card to support this strategy. I later picked up the Vintner, and accordingly pursued wine towns as well. Herr Fuchs was Mr. Cloth, locking up cloth cities all over the board and rolling in cash. Dave had a balanced cycle going, and was building out his set at a good clip, along with Mitch. Renaud yielded his seat to Smitch, which disrupted their game for a bit, but they had a good hold on the eastern Med.

Legating

I found my steady supply of wine made it easy to pick up Legate cards so I made a point of collecting those and spreading out across as many provinces as possible. Cheap and plentiful brick didn't hurt this strategy either. I was a little worried about Mitch and Dave, who had good board presence. Dave's colonists were particularly annoying as they always seemed to be hogging the connections I needed to efficiently expand. The end game loomed, and I grabbed one more Legate before Smitch (I think) closed out the game.

Starting to double up

Adding up the points, I was lingering at the back of the pack until we scored Saturnus - my six Legates and nine provinces raked in a tidy 54 points, vaulting me past Mitch for a 144-125 win. Smitch was right behind at 122, and Herr Fuchs at 118, and Dave a bit further back. Having a game under my belt was a huge advantage, as the god/board position dynamic finally clicked and I felt my expansion had some coherence. There is a lot going on here and the strategies are obscured by the moving parts. We need to return to it soon so folks don't have to relearn the basics while trying to formulate a game. Also, I think the interaction will pick up considerably once players have some experience and can anticipate the needs and ambitions of others.
Twitter Facebook
6 Comments
Tue Jul 12, 2016 3:36 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls

1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5  Next »  [22]

Subscribe

Categories

Contributors

Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.