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Low Player Count Podcast :: Episode 31 - The Jamey Stegmaier Interview

Travis Hill
United States
Dallas
Texas
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Episode 31 - The Jamey Stegmaier Interview

In Episode 31, the Low Player Count Crew releases a new look! They also talk about upcoming preview games they have received, and go in depth with Jamey Stegmaier of Stonemaier Games about design thought process, kickstarter tips, solo mode considerations, and the upcoming Charterstone Legacy game and Euphoria Expansion.

Times:
1:00 - Off the Rails Already
3:11 - A New Look for LPC!
5:27 - A New Microbadge?
6:48 - The Part That Donny Never Edits Out
7:06 - Area 51 Kickstarter
11:30 - Button Shy Games: PentaQuark
12:46 - Floodgate Games: Sagrada
20:02 - BoardGameTables.com are still the best!
21:10 - And it’s Jamey Stegmaier!
25:15 - Kickstarter Solo Stretch Goals
30:00 - The Morten Monrad Pederson Effect
36:38 - Making A Game Support Solo
38:35 - Charterstone!
42:00 - Legacy Issues
47:09 - Destructive vs. Additive Legacy Games
52:55 - Kickstarter, Distribution, Preorder?
54:45 - Our Experiences with Legacy Games
58:18 - Euphoria Expansion
65:25 - End Bits


Sponsored by: BoardGameTables.com
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Nerd E Videos :: Nerd E Reviews Escape the Room: Secret of Dr. Gravely's Retreat

Eric Edens
United States
Tennessee
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Today 12:01 am
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Nerd E Videos :: Learn How to Play Codenames in 5 Minutes

Eric Edens
United States
Tennessee
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Tue Aug 23, 2016 11:21 pm
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BoardGameGeek News :: New Game Round-up: Nominating Cthulhu for King, Fighting Wizards with Rocks, and Exploring Key to the City

W. Eric Martin
United States
Apex
North Carolina
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IELLO has announced a new line of Monster Packs that will serve as mini-expansions for both King of Tokyo and King of New York with the first pack due out Q1 2017, and who else are you going to launch a monster-based line with other than Cthulhu? Here's an overview of what's inside King of Tokyo: Monster Pack – Cthulhu:

Quote:
King of Tokyo: Monster Pack – Cthulhu includes a new monster — Cthulhu, in case you couldn't guess — as well as eight evolution cards for use with King of Tokyo and eight evolution cards for King of New York. Fifteen cultist tokens are also included for card effects.

These packs will retail for $10-15 depending on their contents.


Yes, IELLO is aware of the typo on this promotional image


• Uwe Rosenberg's At the Gates of Loyang is returning to print, with Pegasus Spiele planning to have German-language copies on hand at SPIEL 2016 in October and with Tasty Minstrel Games bringing the English-language version to market at a later date.

WizKids has announced another D&D-related title in its board game line-up, but this design from Cappel, Lim and Cormier is a far different beast than its Temple of Elemental Evil Board Game. Here's a rundown of Dungeons & Dragons: Rock Paper Wizard, due out January 2017 but possibly showing up in time for advance sales at SPIEL 2016:

Quote:
In Dungeons & Dragons: Rock Paper Wizard, the dragon has been slain, leaving behind a treasure over which to fight, and the players are wizards who are fighting to claim the most gold from the dragon's pile.

The players have cards depicting various well-known D&D spells, and each card shows a Rock-Paper-Scissors gesture that the player must make to cast, while pointing at another player as the target of the spell. All players choose their spells simultaneously, and the spells can move the wizards closer or farther away from the treasure or affect the game state in other ways as well.

The first player to collect 25 gold wins.

• As is his custom, designer/publisher Richard Breese of R&D Games has created an explanatory Geeklist for the titles that he plans to debut at SPIEL, those titles being Key to the City – London (GL) and the Keyflower mini-expansion Keymelequin (GL). Complete rules for both items are linked to on their respective BGG game pages.

• I realize that BGG News posts have been sporadic of late, which is odd since this is the time of year in which I see more info on new games than any other. I've just been pouring all of that information onto BGG's SPIEL 2016 Preview — now up to four hundred listings! — and forgetting to post about them in this spot. I keep thinking about posting this or that, but then I see another five games and forget about the earlier ones. I'll try to keep y'all more up-to-date in the days and weeks ahead...
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Tue Aug 23, 2016 11:03 pm
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My Favorite Game Mechanism in... :: Imhotep: My Favorite Game Mechanism

Jamey Stegmaier
United States
St. Louis
Missouri
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https://youtu.be/ok-oDC7xa2Q

Jamey discusses a specific interesting choice in Imhotep that he avoids in other games.
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Tue Aug 23, 2016 9:47 pm
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KidsGamePlay Club :: Play to Learn - Kids Learn How to Take Care of Babies - Creativity For Young Children

Thien Hoan
Vietnam
New York
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Tue Aug 23, 2016 8:15 pm
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    russblog :: European Shogi Championship in Amsterdam (August 18-21, 2016)

    Russ Williams
    Poland
    Wrocław
    Dolny Śląsk
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    We had a fun vacation in Amsterdam for the European Shogi Championship http://www.shogi2016.eu/ recently. On Tuesday we set out by train to Amsterdam (including a night train from Poznan to Duisburg), arriving Wednesday to spend the afternoon exploring the city center. (We'd visited Amsterdam once before, en route to Rotterdam for Universala Kongreso de Esperanto in 2008.) Naturally we visited the game store http://www.schaakengo.nl/ which has lots of Go, Chess, Shogi stuff as well as more typical BGG-style games.

    And as before, we continually admired in amazement the strong Dutch bicycle culture - bike lanes everywhere, with zillions of bikes being ridden all over the place, and at major train stations and tram stops there are bike parking areas with hundreds or even thousands of parked bikes! Amsterdam is also a popular destination for its "coffee shops", but we did not sample the legal wares this trip due to the tournament. (But given my horrible playing during the event, I might as well have been heavily stoned...! shake)

    Wednesday evening we went to the Shogi event, in a suburb south of Amsterdam proper. We stayed inexpensively with about 20 people in a scout cabin in a tiny park in the suburb, bringing our own sleeping bags. It was rustic (e.g. with showers in a different building about 70 meters away) and unfortunately several loud snorers in our room, which my earplugs were not sufficient to block out alas. So I got sleep-deprived during the next few days, unfortunately. The scout cabins were about 10 minutes away from the main site. And we were in a sort of suburban wasteland with very few stores or restaurants, and those which existed were mostly closed in the evening. Later we found there was an odd restaurant-mall with mostly many restaurants about 15 minutes away on the other side of the Shogi event building, and there we enjoyed Thai, Indonesian, and Suriname food over the weekend, yay!

    The Shogi event itself was in an impressive Japanese Go cultural center, evidently generously supported by various Japanese companies etc. It's a 2-story building with lots of rooms, 2 different bars, a formal tea ceremony room, etc. Besides Go players, lots of elderly Bridge players meet there every day usually, we heard.

    There were 120 or so players; we heard it was record size for ESC. (This shows how sadly less popular Shogi is compared to Go - the European Go Congress has like 1000 or so players and lasts 2 weeks each year! Also in the store Het Paard there was a big corner of the store with 4 or 5 bookcases full of Chess books, and several bookcases of Go books, but only one shelf of Shogi books. I think we already own 95% of the maybe 15 or so English language Shogi books in print... especially as we bought the only one offered at the vendor's table which we didn't already own, heh!) Players came from many European countries, of course, and also a few from farther, including several from Brazil even! So for us it felt surreally like an Esperanto event without an easy common language (English is the common default language at an event like this, but some people's English was certainly weak.)

    Thursday there was a team tournament (as seems traditional for ESC) which started 1.5 hours late (instead of just starting it on time, they kept delaying it to allow newly arriving people to form teams and enter, sigh). Anna and I formed a "Poland" team with Mariusz from Cracow, the only other Polish player there this year. (Last year ESC in Prague had many more Poles.) The format is that teams are paired vs other teams each round, with the strongest from each team playing the strongest from the other, middle vs middle, weakest vs weakest. We didn't do well. (I did manage to win 2 of my 4 games, but one was only due to time - my opponent was winning on the board and forgot to hit the clock in byoyomi!) The top 2 teams were both Belorusian, unsurprisingly... there are tons of strong players from Belarus for some reason!

    That evening was the traditional Blitz (8 minutes per player, no overtime) tournament, which had some crazy hour delay after the first round. It turned out to be some data loss error where they had to retype everybody's names... I won only my first game, vs a French player staying in our scout cabin who was unused to blitz play.

    The main tournament started Friday, with 3 rounds through the day. I did hideously badly and lost all 3 vs successively weaker players, ugh! And to add insult to injury, not one but two losses were due to not realizing an opponent's pegasus move had put me in check, DOH!

    Saturday I did better, winning 3 of 4 games, yay!

    Sunday I lost both games.

    There was a traditional tournament of Let's Catch the Lion!, but we didn't play this year. (Apparently only about 20 or so people played; last year in Prague over 50 played, I think!)

    In the end, both Anna and I won 3 of 9 games in the tournament. Not our most stellar results... But it was a fun time, with lots of interesting games. Almost all of mine were quite long, several were among the last games to finish each round.

    Sunday we also got to see a demo of Japanese tea ceremony. I also watched several games of blitz Chess being played, which is always funny & weird when my brain is strongly in Shogi mode, because Chess looks so small and there is no dropping, and no promotion of non-pawns. WTF?!

    =================

    Speaking of Chess, someone was demoing his 3D-printed prototype Chess variant called "Paco-Ŝako", which means "peace chess" in Esperanto. Anna immediately asked him "Ĉu vi parolas Esperanton?" but he replied "No, I do not" and he asked us how to pronounce the name of his game! (It turned out he was mispronouncing "paco" as "pako". More subtly, "Paco Ŝako" as 2 words is dubious and I'd write "Paco-Ŝako" hyphenated.)

    Anna started to play a demo game with him (until the next Shogi tournament round started) and it was fun and interesting! The clever idea is that it's normal Chess except when you "capture" a piece, you join your figure with the target. (They are 3D-printed and designed to hug each other!) A pair can be moved by both players, each moving it as their own piece. You can also capture a pair, which makes the capturing piece hug the target enemy piece and your old hugging piece then makes its own kind of move, possibly to capture another piece, making a possible long chain reaction of displacements. The goal is to capture/hug the enemy king. Clever idea! http://pacosako.com/ is the official site in case you are interested...

    (Oddly this is the only photo my web-searching found of the entire long weekend which had me or Anna in it - ironically without Shogi in the photo...!)

    ==================

    Overall the European Shogi Championship was fun (again), and I certainly recommend it to Shogi players. Compared to our first time at ESC in Prague last year: in Prague, announcements and tournament stuff was announced much more clearly, and it was a better situation with living right next to the tournament site, with easier access to food. This year, the Go center itself was a nicer venue, however, with a separate room for the simultaneous games with 2 pro players, unlike in Prague where they played in a crowded room with the bookstore and people generally milling about chatting. And there were some tables to sit and eat and chat outside (when it was nice weather instead of raining). This year, a local Japanese restaurant supplied free lunches one day, but no vegan lunches were supplied, alas (despite our having mentioned in advance that we were vegan since we saw that lunches would be provided one day - a notable difference from an Esperanto event we went to in Liverpool which gave free lunches and arranged vegan ones for us each day). But overall things went smoothly enough! And it was good to get some more "live face" assocations with some names of Shogi people whom I see in the internet...

    There are rumors that ESC next year will be in Berlin, which we think would be great fun!
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    Tue Aug 23, 2016 8:13 pm
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    Diary of a Fantasy Adventure Design :: More on Combat and Google Sheets Hero chart

    Greg Mahler
    United States
    Pleasant Hill
    California
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    https://drive.google.com/open?id=14N6PKc3BPYD8ZMflRDk_322W1p...

    Combat Flow:

    1. The Player shuffles their deck and draws 5 cards.
    2. If the enemy has the Aggressive attribute, the heroes defend. See Defend below.
    3. The players may make an attack. See Attack below.
    4. If the enemy is slain, combat ends. If not, heroes defend.
    5. If all the Heroes are slain, combat ends.
    6. Draw 2 cards from your Squad Deck and ready all heroes.
    7. Jump back up to 3.

    Defend
    ---The player may exhaust heroes to play defensive cards from their hand.
    ---The enemy's attack value is determined by the level of damage type that player is currently on. You take this base value and draw a Response card, adding the numbers together.
    ---Then you do the same for any defensive cards played by the heroes.
    ---Heroes may now discard card(s) to add +1 to their defense total.
    ---Compare the enemy damage total to the Hero defense total. Any excess damage is assigned to the Hero with the highest Threat left standing in the party.
    ---If all the damage is negated, no damage is assigned.

    Attack
    ---The player may exhaust heroes to play attack cards from their hand.
    ---Draw any response cards indicated and add this to the total attack.
    ---The player may then discard card(s) to add +1 to any type damage.
    ---If successfully meeting the damage for the level, move to the next unless that is the last one.
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    Tue Aug 23, 2016 7:19 pm
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    Bits & Pieces :: Zee Garcia on BackTalk11: Vasel's Law

    Chris Cormier
    Canada
    Toronto (Scarborough)
    Ontario
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    Zee Garcia shows us his “Metal Face” during BackTalk 11: Vasel's Law for The Dice Tower while wearing my Board Game Addict T-shirt.



    Check it out: https://youtu.be/mPCXkhQLIMo
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    Tue Aug 23, 2016 7:01 pm
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    Your Weekly Stinker Challenge :: Stinker Challenge #56: Something not to do in a gym

    Nick Bentley
    United States
    Madison
    Wisconsin
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    Stinker is a doofy game I invented. It exists as a physical game, published by Foxmind, but today we're playing the social media version. It'll take you 1-2 minutes.

    I give you a prompt and a bunch of letters (including two wilds), and you try to form the funniest/most interesting answer from the letters given, through the app at the link below.

    There are no rules about how you use your letters, and spelling and grammar don't matter as much as cleverness and humor.

    Last week's Challenge was "How to avoid being drafted by the army". The winning answer was BE SENATOR'S CHILD, by Frederic Heath-Renn, which has the virtue of being true.

    Click here to play, and then reply to this post with your answers.

    When you go to the link, you'll see this:



    I'll be the judge and I'll pick the winner in 24 hours.

    Sign up here to:

    - be a playtester for the upcoming Stinker app; or
    - be alerted when the Kickstarter campaign for the app goes live; or
    - get email alerts for these Stinker Challenges,

    If you have prompt ideas, submit them here.

    Finally, remember to thumb your favorite submissions to help me pick the winner!

    Previous challenges:

    1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55
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    Tue Aug 23, 2016 7:00 pm
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