GAME DESIGNERS' INTRODUCTION (+GeekGold Give-away)
Michal Stach
Czech Republic
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Recommend
300 
 Thumb up
2.12
 tip
 Hide
If you want to know more about game designers - read 1.
Have you ever designed a game? - read 2.

_______________________________________________________________________________
1

I've noticed that many geeks are proudly wearing "GAME DESIGNER" badge but (with some exceptions for those, who made it to TOP 100) I usually have no clue what did they design.
Being curious kind of person, I usually try to find out more about them. But my curiosity is not satisfied with short descriptions plus one or two pictures, which I can often find in their profiles. I want to know more!
I would like hear their stories and maybe find some gems, which would otherwise stay hidden.

If you are as curious as I am, then thumb this list, so more people will notice it.
We need to lure those designers here, so they will create the lovely geeklist for us. I sure hope they will!


PS. If there is any other question, you would like to ask, don't hesitate and write it. I will add it to the list.

_______________________________________________________________________________
2
HA! We've caught you! Only YOU can help us to satisfy our curiosity! If you have designed a game, please add it (or them) to the list, present it and answer the following questions.


Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?

How long have you been working on this game?

How old were you in that time?

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?

What do you like most about the game?

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?

Did the game live up to your expectation?

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?

Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game.

_______________________________________________________________________________

[size=11]Three most thumbed game entries will win GeekGold!

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
  • [+] Dice rolls
Prev «  1 , 2 , 3  Next »   | 
26. Board Game: Kachina [Average Rating:6.73 Overall Rank:2511]
Scott Caputo
United States
Santa Clara
California
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)? I've always been fascinated by Kachina dolls. My family traveled through Arizona when I was in grade school and I ended getting a small Kachina doll which I still have. I also went to school at the University of Arizona which is very close to the Hopi and Navaho cultures. So, I wanted to develop a board game about Kachinas which has been an unexplored theme so far. In my mind, I could see the game being played--Kachina tiles being played with one tile trumping another in different situations. I had to figure out how to play the game based on the pictures in my mind. I finally figured out that each Kachina had a power number and also a special power. Depending on on the sitation, sometimes the higher power number wins. In other situations, the better special power wins. It took awhile to figure out the various Kachinas, their power numbers and their special powers and make them balanced, but I'm happy with how the game turned out.

How long have you been working on this game?
About three years. I first designed it three years ago, worked on it for a couple of years and it's been in production the past year. It will be available July 2009 from Bucephalus Games.

How old were you in that time?
I would have been 31.

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea? Bucephalus made virtually no rule changes. They did go a different direction with the artwork. The original prototype used photographs of Kachina dolls which we really liked. The Bucephalus version uses actual artistic illustrations of Kachinas. The illustrations are vibrant and cool, but I probably still like the original look better. It's a fun game either way. Here's a look at the original prototype:

Here's the production copy by Bucephalus Games:



What do you like most about the game? I like the fact that the game is so easy to explain (the rules fit on one sheet of paper), yet it offers a nice complexity of strategic choices. Every game unfolds differently depending on where various Kachina tiles are placed. It has a lot of replay value for me and I like the fact that you can set up some really big plays which other players miss until wham! you come out with a 10-point play! I also love the theme. It's not a perfect game, but it would be a game I would want to buy and play even if I hadn't designed it myself.


What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?
I think players who like Carcassonne, Qwirkle, abstract strategy, and tile strategy games would like this game. It's not a super heavy game and it's playable in 45 minutes, so it should appeal to many gamers who are looking for a quick strategic game.

Did the game live up to your expectation? It hasn't been released yet, so I will have to wait and see how it does in the marketplace. I am happy it's being published.


Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project? Yes, I have many games in the works. I am working hard to find a publisher for my game, Unearth, which won the Kublacon Amateur Board Game Design contest a few years ago. It's an Indiana Jones themed game in which players compete for treasures at various South American temples. Players have to watch out for obstacles like giant boulders, snakes, and even death traps! Players can impede each other by stealing their tools, breaking their tools, throwing more obstacles in their way, and sometimes poaching treasures away from other players. It's a light family game playable in an hour. Here's a photo:



Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game. This has been a big year for me. Besides getting Kachina published, I am getting married in 40 days, and I have my first book of poetry coming out by Christmas. What a year!
10 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
27. Board Game: Battlefields of Olympus [Average Rating:6.27 Overall Rank:4852]
 
Peter
Canada
Port Coquitlam
British Columbia
flag msg tools
designer
Makers of Battlefields of Olympus
badge
My 2005 Honda Superhawk 996
mbmbmbmbmb
Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?

When I was a boy, a friend of mine asked me if I wanted to play War. I was very disappointed to discover what the game was all about --a standard deck of playing cards?!? I used to love playing war games. In high school, I often played The Battle of Waterloo with pewter miniatures after school, and I really enjoyed Risk and Axis & Allies. As an adult with children, I don't have a lot of free time, but a part of me still wants to play. I also love ancient war history. Anything involving the Roman Empire in particular, so a Greco-Roman theme was a natural choice. Of course, war is ugly and hellish. I don't want to glorify it. But boys like to play these sorts of games and its a shame that we live in such a PC world that most kids cannot have these experiences in our modern world. A love of war history and the mechanics of war should not be considered a bad thing in my opinion.

How long have you been working on this game?

It took about a year to flush it out and direct all the artwork. I spent many evenings on this project.

How old were you in that time?

I started developing the game when I was 40.

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?

No, a lot has changed. It started out as a 3 hour game on a board made up of cards and plastic bingo tokens. I quickly distilled it down into a simpler 30 minute game. A lot of playtesting back and forth.

What do you like most about the game?

The Ares feature was an epiphany one evening. He was a special god card from the original design. I tossed him into the deck because I was trying to find a way to keep players from turtling. Other games penalize players for reluctance to battle. I wanted a positive motivator. I also love the game's simplicty. To me the design is elegant.

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?

Couples looking for a highly interactive game with a war theme, but plays like a card game. If you don't have a lot of free time on your hands, need a game that fits in your backpack and will take up little table space, this is the game for you.

Did the game live up to your expectation?

I think so. Of course, I wanted to put more into the base game. Budget constraints and other logistical reasons prevented me from doing so. For example, I didn't want to make the game so complex that the average person would feel overwhelmed with the details.

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?

Yes! I am working on an expansion to Battlefields of Olympus. Also, I have an undersea city building design in the works called Calypso.

Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game.

I do this for the fun of it. Besides the creation process where I get to see something I imagine come to life, I really really enjoy hearing others finding joy with my creation. That makes me grin from ear to ear.
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
28. Board Game: TravFuda [Average Rating:0.00 Unranked]
William Hostman
United States
Eagle River
Alaska
flag msg tools
designer
Gaming in Greater Anchorage area, Alaska since 1978. Looking for Indy-willing RPG players in Eagle River (or willing to drive to Eagle River). Geekmail me if interested.
badge
Yes, this really is what I looked like when I uploaded that avatar. Not that it's quite current anymore.
mbmbmbmbmb
Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?

Theme: Traveller RPG line
Mechanism: Stolen from Hanafuda
Not quite just a retheme, as the different symbol densities and suiting make play somewhat different, plus the increased depth in each suit.

Initial impetus was a discussion on a traveller board about what people do while travelling to while away the hours.

How long have you been working on this game?

Took about 3 hours to devise, and 8 hours to do the art.

How old were you in that time?
38
Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?
pretty close. The change from 12 suits of 4 cards each to 10 of 6 was responsible for a large chunk of the design time.

What do you like most about the game?
It's change in strategies from Hanafuda, and it's slightly longer per hand.

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?

Traditional Card gamers, Traveller Fans, Hanfuda fans, fans of bad art.

Did the game live up to your expectation?

yes and no.
It turns out to be more fun for me than regular hanafuda, but I'm still not happy with my artwork on it.

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?

I'm currently working on a mini-supplement for King Arthur Pendragon (RPG) 4th edition. It will be a free release.

Current BG projects: still waiting for more informative outside playtest reports on Dorm Rules than "Wow! This is fun! Nice Job." (several of those, but they don't help!)

Am trying to work up a "sector commander" type SF game.

Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game.
All the TravFuda cards are based off of things one might encounter in traveller.

The Joker is the symbol for the Imperial Marines.

All artwork on the cards is vector drawn, and the entire work was done in Appleworks 6.2 on a Mac PowerBook G4.

My kids (ages 9 and 4 at the time I taught them) enjoyed playing it.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
29. Board Game: Castle Construction [Average Rating:0.00 Unranked]
Kris Wolff
United States
poulsbo
Washington
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?
One night, in early 2005, after playing Carcassonne, a friend of ours (Jen) and I started discussing ideas for a game where you would lay tiles in a castle, trying to build out the various rooms of the castle, where each player had different "criteria" for success. After that, on and off during my commute, I fiddled around with the idea...

How long have you been working on this game?
Ever since 2005, though not for very long at a time...

How old were you in that time?
28.

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?
The product, as it is today is a bit different from the original idea, though one would certainly recognize it as the same game.

In all the versions the basic mechanic is the same: lay a tile of your color adjacent to any other tile on the board. Then, you have the option to place wall pieces (either solid or with a door) between that tile and the bordering tiles (not between your tile and adjacent empty spaces). If your tile, as a result of the wall-placement, is now in its own room, you choose one of the "room tiles" from those available and place it on top of your floor tile. These room tiles show the shape(s) the room may take (some are the basic Tetris shapes -- that's a good way to think of most of them). However, when you place the room tile, this does NOT dictate the orientation of the shape. For example, if you place the Hallway (which is 2 or 3 tiles long in a straight line), that room can extend left-right or up-down and the ultimate size and orientation are not "set" until someone finally places other wall pieces. Also, each room tile shows how many doors it may have, which again, is rarely something that the placing player will dictate; it will be up to all players who later place the walls around the room. This mechanic has always been in the game.



In the first prototype, the primary goal was to build up the largest groupings of your color floor tiles (where adjacent tiles are considered "in the same group", even when separated by an open wall piece -- and not with a solid wall, of course). Ok, this was the ONLY goal. This made for a game that was ALMOST interesting, but basically played itself (except for a few small decisions here and there) and was generally pretty boring.

In the most recent version of the game, when you place a room tile, you also place a "scoring tile" on the room tile. These indicate the type of scoring that occurs in that room and any room it connects to. For example, one scoring tile awards 2 points for each separate "tile group" of your color. Another scoring tile causes each floor tile to be worth -1 point (a very devastating tile to place at just the right time!)


(From top to bottom, these scoring tiles are: each group earns 2 points, each tile loses 1 point, the largest group earns 2 points per tile in that group)


What do you like most about the game?
The basic mechanism is still my favorite aspect of the game. It's quite "puzzly", which is always a good thing, in my opinion. Also, the idea that each room has a "floor plan" and the players all influence the rooms' shapes to their own advantage is quite fun and interesting.

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?
This game certainly requires a spacial mind to play it. You have to be able to envision the possible orientations of all the uncompleted rooms. For players who aren't good at this, they will be at a disadvantage. For those who like spacial thinking, it's quite fun to see how things come together. Also, the way scoring is manipulated is quite fun, since a player can place a lot of their tiles in a particular room, expecting to get a large score, but you can place a negative-score room right next-door, and foil all their plans! The scoring can, however, get a little complicated, since each room scores differently, and scores for the tiles within it and each adjacent room, so this is probably best for players who have experienced some more complicated scoring before (probably not a gateway game).

Did the game live up to your expectation?
Well, "did" sort of assumes I'm done desigining it ...so far, it's turning out to be very interesting and a lot of fun, and in that sense, yes, it's lived up to expectation.

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?
I'm constantly designing, yes. I currently have about 10 ideas that are well formed in my head, several of which are "pretty far along".

The one I'm most excited about right now is a board game inspired by the history book "1421" by Gavin Menzies, where each player is in charge of a Chinese treasure-ship, traveling the world hoping to spread the influence of the Emperor, while bringing news of new lands and peoples back to Beijing... but doing so before the Emperor dies. Some of the aspects of Earth geography aren't cooperating with the specific game mechanics, so I'm thinking of inventing my own world for this game to take place in, where I can move the geographic features around in the way that will make for a better game, rather than an accurate map... We'll see what happens...

The other one I'm working on the most is a card game (meant to be very portable) that is inspired by and takes place in a solar system my son invented, called Emos. It's a solar system that needs to be explored, so you are collecting (via a sort-of set-collection mechanism) the right tools to explore/discover the planets and moons of Emos, and each time you do, you discover the aliens who live there, which provide new tools to help you (and to hinder your opponents). It's a quick filler with what I think is a very interesting set-collection mechanism. It's meant to be played using very little table space, so we can play it while he waits to go on stage (he's a dancer).

Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game.
I want more time to work on my designs.

3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
30. Board Game: Bindle Rails [Average Rating:6.26 Overall Rank:6583]
Jack Neal
United States
Liverpool
New York
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmb
Q: Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?

A: I've always loved train games. Every game should be a train game. That said, there are now probably hundreds of train games out there. What makes mine different?

- I wanted my game to be relatively light compared to most train games, yet not another Ticket To Ride. I loved 1830, but it takes a long time to play and my gaming circle is limited to my wife and two young daughters. I needed something relatively easy to pick up that had a fair amount of replayability.

- I wanted a solitaire train game first and foremost. There simply aren't that many of them.

- I wanted a game system that I could expand. I liked using cards and cubes, mats and markers. That being said, the latest expansions for the game use the cards and cubes more than the other parts I created. The expansions have transformed the game more into a delivery and market manipulation type of game playing out over a map of hexes. In short, it resembles Age of Steam and Silverton in some regards, but it is still unmistakenly Bindle Rails.

- I wanted a game system with events that could hurt you - or help you. Life comes at you fast on its own accord.

- I wanted something that was print and play so people could play it. Cheaply if need be. Expensively if need be. By me, ultimately. :-)

Q: How long have you been working on this game?

A: I think the first prototype to base game was about six months. The expansions have taken less time, but are harder to play test.

Q: How old were you in that time?


A: 35.

Q: Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?

A: Since I had total creative control over it, I'd say the game is pretty much the same at its core. That said, I am amazed at how many different angles I've been able to bake into the design without sacrificing the game play.

Q: What do you like most about the game?


A: I love building track and going places. I like having a tech tree to build upon. I like having managers to hire and fire. I like harnessing randomness and still pulling off a win. I like the maps in the expansions and the locomotives you can get to transport resources. I like money and victory points. I like how the game plays extremely tight throughout and how you usually have a chance to win it right to the end.

Q: What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?


A: If you like Pocket Civ (or even other civiliation games), I think you'd like this game as it is easier to win and clearly was inspired from that design. If you like train games, I think you'd like this one as it takes a lot of things you already know about the genre but distills things down further. If you are a Eurogamer, I think you'd probably like this game. If you like light games, you might not like Bindle Rails as it can be cruel at times, but there are variants to tone things down if you like to build at a slower pace.

Q: Did the game live up to your expectation?

A: Quite. I'm happy that people comment on it, ask questions and try it out. I figured on this.

What I didn't count on was the amount of help and support I've received. I've had the benefit of a community of gamers trying out the initial prototypes and the continued momentum of evolving the game; the initial revision of the rulebook (Derek), initial playtesting and the addition of managers (Omega), the initial feedback on the worthiness of the design (Dad, Jeremiah and John), the people who were kind enough to purchase a game from the initial 25-game run and the others on the forums that have offered criticism and observation on the game as a whole. The outpouring of support has been phenomenal and quite unexpected.

All that said, I wish I had done more homework on having it not be a solitaire game, but that will come in time. I'd like to get 30 Ratings for the game and perhaps get "published" some day, but seeing as I've already done it on my own, the pressure to do so is much less.

Q: Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?

A: I am wrapping up the changes to the Second Edition of the Rules which clarifies issues that have come up over the past year or so. I'm also getting ready to self-publish the Third Expansion Set this summer.

Beyond Bindle Rails, I have a few designs that I am working on. One of them is a middle-weight game themed on the housing boom/financial crisis modeled heavily on Event Cards and pushing your luck with questionable investments.

The other design being a light-to-middle weight transport themed tile placement game with cube delivery and resource management. Both of these are in dream and paper stage. More details as they come along.

Q: Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game.

A: More advice than anything... Don't be afraid to go it alone. Print and play is a community effort and some wonderful designs have been produced. Look them up on BGG and try them out.
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
31. Board Game: Mow 'Em Down: Walker Mowers Edition [Average Rating:5.82 Unranked]
Matt Saunders
United States
Gardner
Kansas
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)? About 15 years ago, while I was in college, I worked at my grandfather's lawn mower manufacturing company. Some of my co-workers and I were joking one day about different "merch" we could make to sell to enthusiasts, and I brought up the idea of a board game. In 2004, when my wife's cousin showed me a game he designed for his history class, I remembered the joke and then began dreaming about how to make the game a reality. It wasn't until around this time that I was also introduce to Euro-games. I haven't play many, but the few I have gave me experiences that I wished to also create in a game.

How long have you been working on this game? From December of 2004 to the spring of 2008, I found spare moments to work on it. The game was self-published and released in the summer of 2008 to coincide with a celebration of the company's production of their 100,000 lawn mower.

How old were you in that time? I was 33.

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea? The original idea didn't have an auction mechanic involved. All the costs of equipment and the payouts of the contracts were fixed. The game was pretty boring and lifeless. After introducing and tweeking the auction mechanic, the game took on new life, but it was still a little unbalanced. Finally, after introducing the "boot a contract" option during a turn, the game became exciting.

What do you like most about the game? I think the best part about the game is the uniquness of the auction mechanic. Mow 'Em Down is a game where the lowest bidder wins the contract. It's exciting when the bids are revealed to see if you won or got low-balled by somebody else.

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game? Those who are looking for a not-too-complex economic game with a unique auction mechanic and don't mind a little randomness from event cards drawn in certain situations will really enjoy it.

Did the game live up to your expectation? A little bit. There were several hundred Europeans at the event where the game was debuted, and I thought the game would be received a lot more enthusiastically than it was. I naively believed that all Europeans were big gamers. Apparently Europeans who are in the lawn equipment sales industry are not.

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project? I'm in the idea stage of a game based loosely upon the ethos of the ancient nine-sided star symbol. I'm also currently working on a 2nd edition of Mow 'Em Down, that will have the "Walker Mower" branding removed and some of the rules streamlined.

Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game. My "real job" is directing a ministry for students (6th - 12th grade) at a church in the Kansas City area. I love introducing people to the realm of games beyond Monopoly and Risk. And if I'm not working, or playing games, I like to play an occasional round of disc golf.
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
32. Board Game: Bartender [Average Rating:7.12 Unranked]
nils zilch
United States
California
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
mbmbmb
gulpWhere did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)? theme: drunk housemates
mechanism: i dont remember

snoreHow long have you been working on this game? made it 3 years ago, forgot it, then resurrected and polished it.

zombieHow old were you in that time? 27-30

devil Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea? original idea was pretty similar but rules were a little different, i got rid of all the old man drinks in favor of girly fruity drinks

yukWhat do you like most about the game? i lose at it consistently and now i know how to mix all sorts of fruity girly drinks

meepleWhat kind of players do you think will enjoy the game? amateur drunks/college kids, aspiring bartenders,and of course hard-core gamers that find out that its a cut throat game of skill and observation

whistle Did the game live up to your expectation? way beyond, it sat in a closet for years

angry Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project? maybe...

Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
33. Board Game: Lungarno [Average Rating:6.20 Overall Rank:3478]
Michele Mura
Italy
Pisa
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?

Lungarno started with the theme, the city where I was born and where I actually live: Pisa in Tuscany.

How long have you been working on this game?
I worked on this game for about one year. I started on November 2007 and the game hit shelves for Essen 2008.

How old were you in that time?
I was born the 12 December of 1972 so, when I started designing Lungarno I was two year younger...

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?

The main concept it's the same. Playing along the Arno river, building and using pawns to mark area and collect money/points. The first idea was that your markers (priests, scholars, merchants, ecc..) collected money if their place was sourrended by beautiful things such as gardens, squares, building of the same design, if there were pictures showed inside the churches and so on... There were also special tiles which call up events! Then the game changed and I concentrate myself on the economic element.

What do you like most about the game?
You need only one play to learn it but you've to play it quite a lot to master. I also like the chance to play twice paying one coin/point.

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?
It's a placement game. People who like that, will enjoy Lungarno. It's simple but strategical and so it may attract first time players and gamers. Someone says it's like Carcassonne but the game is quite different. The only points of contact are tiles and markers to put on them, that's all!

Did the game live up to your expectation?
You can (must) always emprove your work. And I'm still working on small expansions, variants and many other things. There's also an italian fan of the game who's remodelling the art.

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?
Yes, I still design games. Lungarno was the second, the first was the card game Easy School. Now I'm working on the first expansion of Lungarno which will be showed at next Essen (2009). I'm also working on two new games. The project which is more concrete it's a sci-fi combat game where you explore and colonize planets.

Sorry for my English!!
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
34. Board Game: Plunder [Average Rating:6.24 Overall Rank:2645]
Karl Lepp
United States
Eau Claire
Wisconsin
flag msg tools
designer
Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?

Theme, theme, and theme. I've loved the classic adventure pirate theme ever since I was a little boy. I hadn't played pirate for almost a decade before making the game, was wistful for it, researched several different existing pirate games, and when none of them scratched the itch I had, decided to make my own. Some of the mechanics were inspired by other games I was playing at the time; some came from inspirations during repeatedly playing through the mock-ups I had - a very long, iterative process.

How long have you been working on this game?

Started in late 2002; published in 2004; doing some fan-based polishing work now.

How old were you in that time?

35 in 2002.

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?

Exact same in theme, very similar in playstyle and rules, most published components (with exception of ship tokens) very similar.

What do you like most about the game?

How we (with definite help from Julie, as co-designer) were able capture the thematic experience I wanted, along with the luck/tactics and weight target I was going for. I'll also add what I liked least: how the rules presentation and thematic rules decisions limited the intended audience I wanted to reach with this game.

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?

I originally thought I'd gotten the rules and their presentation to a form that would get into the family market, however, I now know that it takes a thematic gamer or "classic pirate" fan to delve in and explain the game to others.

Did the game live up to your expectation?

In playstyle and fun, absolutely!

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?

Yes, however, I'm dedicated first to raising my children and supporting my family, so I don't have near the time I want these days. I have several projects "in the works:" a Shakespearen theme, completing the expansions of Horrific (as fan-based material), two Sci-fi adventure games (one more serious, one more snarky), a faerie court theme, an "environmentalist's fantasy," a silly game on prosyletizing, another silly game on comic heros, and a more general childhood adventure game. Some are nearing completion, and I'm working on them "hobby-style," which means as the mood hits me and time allows.

Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game

As with Plunder, the games I design will always be games I want to play with others, and where I cannot find an already-existing game which fills the same niche in my mind. I grew up playing games of all (and I mean all) stripes, and still do. Music, spirituality, history, science, ecology, and imagination will always influence the theme of my games; pairing decision-making with just enough depth of rules to accurately convey the theme to the target audience will always govern my choices of mechanics; and I'll always strive to give a new and interesting twist to playstyle.
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
35. Board Game: Ruby Rush! [Average Rating:6.91 Unranked]
Andy Van Zandt
United States
South Ogden
Utah
flag msg tools
designer
PlayTMG.com
mbmbmbmbmb
Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?

I was waiting for a round to end at a Magic: the Gathering PTQ and wanted something to play that was extremely fast but generated high... anxiety? i guess? where despite it being only a minute long, you felt threatened the whole time. So i used a pen and wrote on magic cards, the deck was only... i think 16 cards, because i was only intending it for 2 players. and it did what i wanted to, with very little tweaking, and my friends were very entertained.

as for the theme... the game was actually called "Hi Plz!", as that was what the cave-in card was called at the time. this originates from a forum i used to frequent, that had a lengthy drama-filled thread, and in the middle of it some random dude posted "Hi Plz!", and the next post was the admin informing them that they had been banned for posting that. I found it very amusing.

How long have you been working on this game?


After playing it (and watching my friends play it) about 50 times that day, it just went in my pocket and sat on my shelf until I decided I wanted to actually try harder at the game design thing (i had several board/card games at the time, but just made them for myself and my friends, as a creative outlet). once i decided i was going to try harder, and educated myself some, evaluated my goals, and decided i was going to make it the first serious attempt, it went under development for about... 9 months?

How old were you in that time?

originally, at the tournament? about 3 or 4 years before the publication date. however old that would have made me. 23 or something?

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?


Very similar, same stress, with tuned values and quantities of cards for the intended percentage of game win/loss types, card interactions, and stress levels at the different player quantities. it looks like it was two minutes of work, but it actually is VERY tuned for the results it generates. I've literally played it over a thousand times.

What do you like most about the game?

it does what i want it to do: it plays fast, teaches fast, demos fast, is portable, and generates the right level of "stress"

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?

it's a filler game, aimed at the american hobby shop market (because that's who i knew i'd be pitching it to). Even if that's not your cup of tea (due to the heavy randomness in the game, i know it's not this site's cup of tea in general), the portability, speed and the risk management make it good for what it wants to be... something to carry in your pocket and whip out if you're bored.

Did the game live up to your expectation?


absolutely.

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?


yes, after doing what i wanted to with Ruby Rush! (which is to say, using it to help me understand the business, pitching, and production end to things better- and after getting it on the shelves at various comic shops, re-affirming how much i hate selling things, even though i was successful at every shop i went and pitched to), I've tweaked designs that come before it and made lots of stuff after it. lots of things get shelved, and some stuff I'm pitching to companies right now, to see if I can understand that end better. the three things on my "active" table right now are "Dolphinicky", a euro-dice (hehe) game about dolphins rounding up food, "Star Pig", which is a family racing game with a cool card mechanic, and "Bits and Pisces", a fish-and-sell economic card game.

also, i've been putting up some of my other projects as print-and-play games recently, just because i've got more games shelved than will ever see the light of day otherwise: Patience Fighter, Garden Path, and Pirates of Van Zandt, and probably before the end of the summer i'll put up "The Watchtower Tragedy", a 2 to 4 player game about defending your city walls from zombies... unsuccessfully. the goal is to be the last one to succumb

Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game.

Here's some more thorough design notes for Ruby Rush!, for those so inclined: http://www.truekidgames.com/RR%20Design%20Notes.html

go check out some of my other designs-in-progress and post something on my forums at http://www.truekidgames.com.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
36. Board Game: Linwood [Average Rating:5.55 Overall Rank:8768]
Shem Phillips
New Zealand
Waikanae
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
mbmbmbmbmb
Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?
My cousin made a game on the backs of old books when he was younger. It was a random board, made up of 50ish square tiles. I liked the random board idea so much, that I decided to design a game build around this mechanism. I like the way hexagons tessellate, so I went with them instead of squares.

How long have you been working on this game?
From start to finish, about eighteen months.

How old were you in that time?
Twenty three/four

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?
My original idea was to make a pirate game, where you collect hidden treasure. The feel of the game is similar, but it has changed a lot over time.

What do you like most about the game?
The simplicity and re-playability of it.

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?
People who enjoy meeting up with friends to play casually, as well as families.

Did the game live up to your expectation?
It is already selling faster than I imagined. It has been out for five weeks now, and I have sold over fifty copies.

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?
I am currently working on a card game. I don't want to say much else, but I am very excited to be working on it!

Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game.
I documented all the steps I took in manufacturing and publishing Linwood. You can view it, and much more at: www.linwoodgame.co.nz
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
37. Board Game: Talasocracia [Average Rating:0.00 Unranked]
José Antonio Rivero
Spain
Las Palmas de Gran Canaria
Gran Canaria- Canary Islands
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?
I love trading games and also I love games with nautical element,such as Hansa,Oltre Mare and the sort. I was searching for a boardgame with a similar topic but in ancient times with phoenicians merchants. I found Tyros, I bought it , but it was not what I was looking for. I am not saying is a bad game but there all elements of trading are missing. I wanted to feel that I buy, sell, exchange products, sail to exotic and far away colonies and take risks and make profits. Did I found such a game in the market with Greek and Phoenicians?? NO, then I said to myself why don´t you try and design such one ?? After that I started to research and read many articles and history books about that period.

How long have you been working on this game?
From september 2008 to april 2009

How old were you in that time? 42, and I am still 42 !cool
Was the final product the same as/similar to from your original idea?
Yes, and as a matter of fact the final result was exactly what I was looking for. However there were a few changes in mechanics after playtesting was done, but the main idea remained the same.

What do you like most about the game?
The feeling that you are into the history and you believe a greek or phoenician merchant yourself. You can feel joy and happiness from your good profits, but also frustration from bad ones or unexpected events (storms, pirates attacks, etc.). Also the changing situation during the game that keep players in high tension and emotion all the game long.
I like very much the art design and aesthetic of board, tables and event cards ,
Thanks for your wonderful help David Prieto ,the artist !

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?
players who like history, economic theme and taking risks and if things go wrong who are able to start again. Also to players who do not mind to deal with some hazard.

Did the game live up to your expectation? So far the game has not been published, hopefully it does.
Anybody interested ??? whistle

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project? Yes, before designing this one I had almost designed (not finished yet) a game about exploration in the Pacific Ocean during XVI century and another one about trading in Far East end of XIX century. With board, ships and cards. Did I write I like nautical games ? laugh

Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game. I live in Gran Canaria , Canary Islands , some legends said to be the rests of lost Atlantida continent
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
38. Board Game: Scream Machine [Average Rating:6.04 Overall Rank:3217]
Joe Huber

Westborough
Massachusetts
msg tools
Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?

I've always enjoyed amusement parks; Scream Machine is one of a couple of designs I've completed - and many more I've worked on - on the subject.

A central mechanism in Scream Machine was inspired by one of my favorite games. It's one I rate a 10, and people have successfully guessed it, so I leave it as a puzzle.

How long have you been working on this game?

About two years.

How old were you in that time?

33 at the start.

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?

The only major difference is one required in order to publish the game. The deck of passengers originally contained enough cards to avoid the need to recycle, but Jim needed to keep the deck to 120 cards to keep the manufacturing cost in line.

What do you like most about the game?

The fact that it includes the Tumble Bug, a wonderful amusement park ride that is nearly extinct.

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?

No idea. It's easier to answer the opposite question; those looking for a complex game, a wargame, or a negotiation game will go away disappointed. Those who require substantial board play will likely as well; the board is only there for scoring.

Did the game live up to your expectation?

Absolutely - Aaron's artwork is fantastic. I wish it had sold better for Jim, but I don't think he took a bath on it, at least...

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?

Yes, I still design games - I'm working on my 100th design currently. (Not 100th _published_ design, of course.) It's my attempt to put a different spin on 18xx, breaking as many of the rules of 18xx as I can get away with while aiming for - if I can manage it - a two hour playing time.
7 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
39. Board Game: Mykeria [Average Rating:0.00 Unranked]
Krzysztof Zięba
Poland
Kraków
flag msg tools
designer
No rest for the creative!
mbmbmbmbmb
Sorry I managed to add it only now... for some reason it took three days for the admins to add the game to the database...

Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?

I used to be a die-hard 'Magic: The Gathering' player, so I guess that every card game I made and will make in the future is going to be influenced by that game to same extent, 'Mykeria' included. But, as I explain below, it mostly inspired my initial idea.

As for the theme, I also used to 'design' RPG worlds, almost on a daily basis I had to think of some gods to watch over the worlds, so I thought of a lot of such individuals. That, plus a big influence of Greek myths during my childhood, where the gods took active part in the happenings of everyday life, and worshipping them was very important.

How long have you been working on this game?

I believe I had the first idea somewhere in Summer 2007, then left it be and got back to it around September when I designed the first prototype, completely changing the game. The last serious tests took place around the beginning of this year and right now any changes, other than maybe some cosmetics, are very unlikely.

How old were you in that time?

I was 20 when I started, the game is going to be published later this year, and I turned 22 on the 26th of May.

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?

A lot different. The first idea I had was far more similar to MtG and was more combat based. I have the initial notes with me, and I can see that I had different names for the gods – there was Bernon (fairly similar to Rakeros from the finished game), Korros (similar to Boguhar), Oratis (a god of Light, who, after a sex-change became Cerephara) and Vivala, a goddess of Nature. But I had some good ideas back then (for example having buildings), and I'll probably use them at one point.

An important change from the first prototype was making the Initiative and Special Powers decks one, which has been suggested by Gosia Majkowska (author of “Kazaam”) to reduce the number of cards, but it also provided an additional layer of strategy to the game, which was great.

What do you like most about the game?

I like the gods I thought of, having spent some time to also design their looks and specific insignia for each of them. I have been thinking on re-theming the game at one point to set it in an European mythology (Greek or Norse) but that didn't work out as I couldn't find characters who served well as Namredil and Rakeros, so I left the fantasy theme.

I also enjoy it because it's not just a card game, as most of the cards help you manipulate the limited pool of Followers to join your cause. And, to top it up, variable player powers are a nice feature, though it was very hard to even out and it probably took the most time to test.

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?

I'd say this is a light-medium card game, so anyone who enjoys this kind of play and the theme should like this. The graphics are done by a talented illustrator, so if you like a game with nice art, you should definitely check out 'Mykeria'.

Did the game live up to your expectation?

As for now we only just started promoting this title, so I won't know for a while, sales-wise Personally though, I'm very happy with it and I will enjoy playing the published copy.

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?

Yes, I'm hoping to get a few games published next year, as I'm still working on them and they won't be ready for 2009. I won't be getting into details here, but the projects closest to being finished are a family game about Pizza (which I'm doing with my girlfriend, Lin
Lin
United Kingdom
Rochester
Kent
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
) and a building game about corporations trying to complete a space base. I also have a quite old project about merchant caravans which is going to be set in the period of Kazimierz the Great's reign (XIV century Poland) which I just started to clean of dust, and an innovative mechanic for an adventure game that I'm going to tackle with as soon as I finish all the other projects. After that there's still some things I'd like to do, and we'll see how that goes.

I'm also working, in a rather on-and-off fashion, on three RPG's: two of them connected into one, divided, fantasy world, and the third being a Cyberpunk project. I'm trying to touch on different themes so to avoid repetition of other people's ideas. I'd love to test those in an actual gaming session, but they still require a lot of work with the rules and world and I don't have enough time anymore to devise a whole RPG quickly. But it's slowly progressing, step by step.
So I've got a lot of work ahead of me, but that's fine, because I love designing games

Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game.
I will try to update the game's page as much as possible and will also be happy to answer any questions about 'Mykeria'. So don't hesitate to ask!

I'm hoping I'll be able to finish up my other projects, so I can share them with you and, hopefully, the whole gaming community around the globe. It all takes time though, and to be honest I would very much like to be able to design a computer game based on one of my RPG's, as it would give me the needed 'kick' to complete those ideas. Plus, designing computer games is yet another thing I'd love to do.

Also, thanks a lot to Michal for setting up this GeekList, as I really enjoyed sharing my thoughts about my first 'child' and other projects. A bit of a shame I didn't manage to post while the topic was still on the front page, but I hope you enjoyed reading about 'Mykeria' anyway
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
40. Board Game Designer: J. C. Lawrence
J C Lawrence
United States
Campbell
California
flag msg tools
designer
I should probably list for Age of Steam: London/Sun, but that was a while ago and is far less interesting to me. Thus instead I'll write about the current game to pop out of the pipeline: Corner Lot (ftp://ftp.kanga.nu/users/claw/odd/games/prototypes/CornerLot..." target="_blank" class="postlink" rel="nofollow">rules), which is currently considering publication. It is a strange 45-60 minute set-collecting auction game based on the 1830 private auction, in which players bid for the right to bid. Among other things, Corner Lot came in the top 3 at the Kublacon design contest (I'm told by the contest organiser that it would have won had it the player aid it has now).

Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?

Quoting the acknowledgments section of the rules:

Quote:
7 Acknowledgments

I'd like to thank the designers and their games that unwittingly inspired and helped in the design of Corner Lot (alphabetical by designer):

• Francis Tresham and 1830: The Game of Railroads and Robber Barons
• Reiner Knizia and Medici and Modern Art

Other individuals who notably helped with commentary and suggestions during development: Ariel Seoane (Seo_ on Boardgamegeek), Becca Tortell, Benjamin Keightley (Coca Lite on Boardgamegeek), John Hart, and Rick Holzgrafe (rholzgrafe on Boardgamegeek). Without the generous assistance and creativity of the above individuals Corner Lot would not have been designed.


How long have you been working on this game?

According to my blog I started development on 4 March 2009.

How old were you in that time?

A few months younger than I am now?

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?

Very similar. The only significant change made was adding Empty Lot property cards. I'm afraid the game was nearly complete when first conceived.

What do you like most about the game?

It is hard to play well and has a fairly steep learning curve.

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?

Fans of heavy/calculational super-fillers.

Did the game live up to your expectation?

Yes.

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?

I've several other projects in the pipe:

- Muck & Brass (currently at a publisher)
-- Muck & Brass is in the same family as Pampas Railroads and Wabash Cannonball, sharing a similar track-building and development curve, but adds company mergers, controlled dividends and a Neuland-ish time mechanism.


- 'Ohana Proa (needs development I am the wrong person to do)
-- A gift-economy game of largesse that asks the question, How can you win when your primary activity is to improve the positions of the other players?


- Something that looks to be a melange of Colonial Zoo, Modern Mogul, Space Race and Trade Winds
-- The core concept remains a Venue/Product/Transport/Consumption logistical pipelining game.


- And (current thought toy) a game of pure timing and opportunity cost management.
-- Probably a card game, probably using my perverted dynamic rondel mechanism as it handles time interestingly.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
41. Board Game: Dash-in Dungeons [Average Rating:7.24 Unranked]
Mark McPherson
Australia
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Q. Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?

I personally went looking for a portable, fast-play set of adventure game rules to take with me that I could play anywhere and anytime; but could find no solid offerings out there that really suited my needs, so I designed Dash-in Dungeons.

Q. How long have you been working on this game?

It took 3 years from initial design to product launch (self-published); most of that time was spent in play-testing and prototyping. Play-testing definitely helped me get the design right.

Q. How old were you in that time?

38 when I started.

Q. Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?

Pretty close; but the game was a little larger (though more fully-featured) than I'd intended. It still turned-out OK though.

Q. What do you like most about the game?

It's quick and easy to play and to teach new players. Other people appear to have fun playing it, and that's very pleasing to me.

Q. What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?

Fantasy role-players without enough time to devote to a full RPG, older children (9+) who like card-based mechanics & dungeon-crawl players who enjoy a game with a flexible rule-set.

Q. Did the game live up to your expectation?

Yes. I achieved what I set-out to do; learned a lot along the way, and had enormous fun doing it. The best part is that other people like it!

Q. Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?

Yes, I'm looking at expanding Dash-in Dungeons; there are intermediate level and advanced level sets to make the game complete, as well as expansions of the basic components to include more dungeon tiles, monsters, characters, adventures and wilderness adventuring.

Q. Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game.

Dash-in Dungeons has exhibited properties beyond its original design intent: Although it started-out and ended-up as a short-play role-playing game; I believe it has broader appeal.. as a fantasy adventure game (similar to Descent:JITD - which I really enjoy myself) for board-gamers who want to branch-out a bit; as a teaching-aid to introduce new players to the fantasy adventure genre; and as game that appeals to younger children (I've seen kids as young as 7-years old pick-up the rules) and non-gaming adults alike (I've had a 70-year old man thoroughly enjoy the game - even though he's never played much more than Monopoly before..)

These things have been some of the pleasant surprises for me.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
42. Board Game: Generic Racing Game [Average Rating:6.56 Unranked]
Kai Bettzieche
Germany
Eppelsheim
Rheinland Pfalz
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?
Back at school, my whole world revolved around gaming. Everything I learned was put into one of two cathegories: a) Useful for gaming; b) Useless.
When in math I learned about vectors, and then in physics, that speed can be displayed as a vector, I added 1+1 and figured that this is "useful for gaming". Back in those days I used lego minifigs as racers and a square plate as racing track - and guess what: it worked fine

How long have you been working on this game?
From the first thought up to publishing it here? Uhmm .. somewhere between 10 and 15 years.

How old were you in that time?
Now I'm almost 30 .. You do the math

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?
Basically it's still the same - it just looks different ..

What do you like most about the game?
That it's simple and the rules describe the pure mechanics - it's up to the player to create a theme or anything else he wishes to add to the game.

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?
Anyone who enjoys a) racers b) tactical games .. or wargames (with the proper variant) ..

Did the game live up to your expectation?
absolutely

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?
I do! Last game I created required to assemble more than 100 dice, so it's unlikely that anyone is ever going to play it (this even includes myself!)
Right now I'm designing a fast-paced solo dungeon crawler, since I need something to entertain me on my railroad-travelings.

Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game.
Nah - play it and get addicted all by yourself
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
43. Board Game: Adaptoid [Average Rating:7.10 Overall Rank:3481]
Néstor Romeral Andrés
Spain
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
mbmbmbmbmb
ADAPTOID

Self-published (NESTORGAMES)

Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?

This game is an evolution of LIFE. I wanted to combine a growth mechanism with a system that allows pieces to change their properties.

How long have you been working on this game?

About 3 years. No full time, obviously. The idea was cooking inside my head.

How old were you in that time?

I'm 37 now.

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?

Strange, but the original idea is quite simmilar to the final game. The design has suffered a lot of changes to end up almost like it started. It evolved to a complex civilization game, but then I distiled it just to find the initial design again.

What do you like most about the game?

I like the fact that not everybody gets used to it. It sounds strange, I know. I like games that get discovered over time. The real game is hidden in the adaptoid feeding mechanic. So it is in fact a territory domain game, like go.

I also like the fact that the more powerful a piece is, the more food it needs to survive. So it gets weaker.

I love its depth.

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?

Experienced abstract gamers. Chess players.

Did the game live up to your expectation?

Sure.

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?

Yes. I've self-published another 2 games:

Hexellation: I designed this game to help my students improve their pattern recognition capabilities. It worked perfectly. It is a hard game.

Hippos & Crocodiles: Simple and fun. People love it. An expansion coming soon.

I'm actually focusing in publishing a bunch of games from other designers with NESTORGAMES, but there are a few designs I'm working on:

- A F1 racing game: Almost ready for production.
- A Sci-fi terror game: Playtesting.
- An skirmish game: Almost ready for production.
- An evolution of ADAPTOID using special pieces too.

Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game.

Imagine a game like GO, where you can improve the pieces so they can move and attack. There are 28 different configurations.

Edited: I had to reduce the number of spaces and adaptoids because of production/market issues. The original game uses a gigantic board with tons of adaptoids, legs and pincers. I anybody wants to try it, please write me. I'll be pleased to provide you with a lot of adaptoids.


4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
44. Board Game: Chunky Fighters [Average Rating:6.24 Overall Rank:4579]
Nick Hayes
United States
Los Angeles
California
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Build a small band of warriors out of body part and weapon dice and fight 'em to the death! As your fighters health worsens, so does their appearance. Use disarming, blocking, first aid, and called shots to cripple, decapitate, and totally destroy all of your opponent's fighters.

Popular for its custom dice and appealing art, the game can be played in as little as five minutes, with most games coming in under twenty minutes. The first expansion was released in June, and new content is always in the works.


Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?
Well, I designed the game as an entry in a contest here on BGG. You can find the original version in the contest thread. The contest required only that you use custom dice. I wanted to find a really creative way to do this, and somehow the result was Chunky Fighters.

How long have you been working on this game?
I started in May 2009 and I am still adding content to the game.

How old were you in that time?
I was 31 at the time.

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?
The basic mechanics of the game have remained the same. One major difference between the early prototype and the game I entered in the contest was the removal of a resistance and weakness mechanic, where weapons would have elemental attributes and certain fighters would take more damage for certain weapons/attacks and be resistant to others. But given the limited damage and hit point range, I quickly realized that this wouldn't work.

What do you like most about the game?
I like that the fighters can double as toys. One of the fun pastimes of Chunky Fighters is building your own fighters by mixing and matching different body parts (this isn't a game feature, just a fun thing to do).

I love the loud shouts of victory when you make a particularly lucky roll.

I also like the packaging that I designed.

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?
Chunky Fighters is designed for kids and adults who never wanted to grow up. They love playing with toys. They love building things. They love destroying things. They love rolling dice and most of all love being able to claw their way from the edge of defeat to an unforgettable victory.

Did the game live up to your expectation?
Yes. Since winning second place in the competition, Chunky Fighters has become the most owned, most rated, and most played game from among all of the entries.
There are now a total of twelve different fighters. Four in the original Chunky Fighters, four more in the first expansion, and another four in the second, forthcoming expansion.
So the game has grown beyond its original form and is still growing!

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?
I am constantly designing games. Here are some of my current projects:

oThe Society: A 2-6 player dexterity-based monster hunting game based in folklore and cryptozoology.
o Verden Killers: A solo- to two-player asymmetrical card-driven combat game where the player controls a pack of werebeasts attempting to take down huge, mecha-like forest monsters.
o Chunky Dungeon: A solo- to four-player tile-based dungeon crawl for Chunky Fighters. Your party consists of your favorite Chunky Fighters who face off against a wide assortment of monsters, mazes, and treasure. The monsters included in Chunky Dungeon will also be compatible with Chunky Fighters, for huge battles and crazy team-ups.

Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game.
Chunky Fighters is unique because it is one of the few games I've designed that can be provided as a print-and-play game. The majority of my designs focus around some unique component or part that cannot be easily reproduced by potential players. Unfortunately, these games will have to wait until publication to see the light of day.

Thanks for taking the time to read my interview!
-Nick
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
45. Board Game: Vampires' Dance [Average Rating:6.10 Unranked]
Mike Reading
Australia
SA
flag msg tools
designer
Vampires' Dance is a free PnP from Dann May and Mike Reading. The game is a two player struggle to rule vampirekind. Players must cooperate to fend off vampire and hunter attack as they move through the centuries, but only one can win!

Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?
The game was born from a bgg co-op game design competition. We were trying for a semi-coop game that would be spouse-friendly. After throwing a stack of ideas around we eventually asked our wives That was the vampire theme tied down. The mechanism and backstory was all the rest of the work.

Dann and I haven't worked together before. In fact we still haven't met. (Though Dann if you're reading this I'm driving through Melbourne on the 16th December on the way back to Tassy! Meet for a beer?). But luckily we complimented each other well and were able to act as mutual sounding boards for a wide range of story and mechanic ideas.

For us game design is about throwing about many ideas. Ideas that 'feel' right are kept until (weirdly) a game emerges.

How long have you been working on this game?
We had two months for the competition. At the beginning that seemed like a lot. The day before the deadline it seemed woefully inadequate.

We put a lot of evening's work into this game. We used a wiki which turned out to be a fantastic collaborative workspace. In the end we had about 20 pages, with hundreds of messages attached, and wrote each other 30,000+ words.

How old were you in that time?
About 5 days younger than we are now. ninja

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?
The timeline, with the year numerals as an important part of the game was locked in early. Then the idea of working with layers going from spiritual through to mortal. Then 4 types of cards and the way they interacted. The special spirit powers and year conditions were last once we were sure the basic game played well.

It's hard to tell which were original ideas anymore. The final product seems purified though... lean... clarified!

What do you like most about the game?
I like a couple of things. The artwork is just so professional (kudos Dann). And the theme and atmosphere really carries the game. From the mechanic side, I like that at the core is way to keep players in step (players alternately reveal cards) but that other actions players can do at any time. One of the parts of spouse-friendly for us was that players couldn't really savage each other. That interaction was mostly friendly in a competitive way.

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?
People who want a themed quick light two player semi-coop card game. meeplemeeple

Did the game live up to your expectation?
The game exceeded my expectations! For me the game, art and rules have come together to make something very nice. That's not to say Dann and I aren't very open to ideas for improvement. We earned about 20gg each through the process and I intend to spend all mine tipping geekers who make constructive comments. Hopefully, with the attention of bgg the second edition will be even better.

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?
We were surprised by the time and effort our first game took and learnt some big lessons. E.g. Pace the art out over the whole design process so the graphic designer doesn't end up a paint splattered sleep-deprived zombie zombie But to actually answer the question. Vampires' Dance is definitely going to get more love and we are both eyeing other competitions. (September has a rich crop!)
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
46. Board Game Designer: Scott Nelson
Scott Nelson
United States
Idaho Falls
Idaho
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Triage
 


A game about trying to run the patients through, get them fixed and free up some bed space for more patients to occupy. As a co-op game, there is only one way for everyone to win, 3 ways to lose.

The prototype board for HHH
 


Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?
Theme kind of came from the mechanisms. I had a different idea for a theme, but the hopsital worked so much better. With the co-op of Pandemic being unleashed onto the world, I'll have to say making it a co-op game was strongly influenced there, but in reality the theme was not.

How long have you been working on this game?
Around 5 months.

How old were you in that time?
Same age as now.

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?
Different theme, same mechanisms.

What do you like most about the game?
After many tests, I still find it fun to play.

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?
Those who like co-ops, light-hearted Doctors who see it only as a game. Since it is about trying to save 15 lives before 4 die, it is a little off-putting for some who take it seriously.

Did the game live up to your expectation?
Moreso. The tests have all been very positive in all groups that have played it (even though some didn't beat the game yet).

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project? Yes, my current design is a tech-tree building game that sets on an island of nothingness that you take resources to build and that to build other builds. Very Roads and Boats-esque, but no chits. No name for it yet except Kingdom Builder Game. As with civ games, the tech tree could be easily added to, and as of late I have added a few more builds to work no which has given it more depth.

Also a few others in the bgg database already, looking for a publisher:
Lifeguard on Duty

Foodfight!
 

Hog Haven (pigs in the mafia)
and others such as Johnny Appleseed and Kingdom Builder mentioned above.
Diver Down is currently in a publisher's queue to be released.


Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game.
I have 2 games working their way through the pipelines to be published, but nothing to date, and I have 3 more titles looking for publishers as well - 2 of them ready for Hippodice submission.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
47. Board Game: The Isle of Doctor Necreaux [Average Rating:5.65 Overall Rank:6637]
Jonathan Leistiko
United States
Austin
Texas
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
mbmbmbmbmb
You're an international team of elite super-agents. The diabolical Doctor Necreaux has kidnapped the world's leading scientists and forced them to build a Doomsday Device. Infiltrate the island, find the scientists, and escape before everything gets blown to Kingdom Come.

Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?
Mechanically, this game is the result of taking an earlier, competitive game design and making it co-operative. That earlier game design is Twisty Passages. Twisty Passages is also my free print-and-play Game of the Month, and is available at: http://www.invisible-city.com/play/530/twisty-passages
Thematically, The Isle of Doctor Necreaux is inspired by my fondness for the design aesthetic of Hugo Gernsback ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugo_Gernsback ) and the vision of what the future would be like in the 20's through 50's.

How long have you been working on this game?
Criminey... Let me look up a few file dates here...
Work first started on March 11, 2007. It just hit retail shelves this past Friday (September 25, 2009). That's not bad, I suppose.

How old were you in that time?
36

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?
The final product is very similar to what I originally conceived. There are little mechanical differences in cards and character powers here and there. The original game was easier in some ways and harder in others. The final product is still perfectly fine.

What do you like most about the game?
There are several features I like a lot:
• You choose how hard you want each turn to be at the start of the turn.
• The game can handle from one to five players.
• You have to earn the items you find during play instead of automatically claiming them.

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?
• Players who like Flash Gordon and Buck Rogers.
• Players who like relatively quick games.
• Players who like a mix of chance and strategy.
• Players who like "press your luck" games.
• Gaming groups who need an pick-up game that can handle one to five players.
• Families looking for games to play with a wide range of children.
• People who like to play games, but don't always have someone to play against.

Did the game live up to your expectation?
I think it did...
Yeah, I'm pretty sure it did. I'll know better in about two months.

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?
Oh boy... Yes, I still design games. I've been putting up one free print-and-play game every month at http://www.invisible-city.com/play since January 2000. There are more than 110 free print-and-play games there to date. Almost all of the games have entries here on BGG. You can find most of them on the Invisible City publisher page: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/boardgamepublisher/320

I have another game coming out from AEG: Pressure Matrix. It should be out in stores soon.

I'm actively seeking publishers for about 45 of my designs. Some of these designs have been featured on the Invisible City site while I've kept others under wraps. I'm pretty excited about quite a few of the designs, and there's one that has an innovative mechanic that I'm really enthusiastic about.

Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game.
I also enjoy origami, rock climbing, and cooking. I've been living in Austin, TX for 10+ years and love it here. Looking forward to BGG con 2009!
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
48. Board Game: Infinite City [Average Rating:6.25 Overall Rank:1777]
Brent Keith
United States
Maryland
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmb
indigo Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?
One afternoon, as we were in the office talking about possible artists for one of our games, Charles Urbach came up as a possibility for a portion of the art. Another artist was selected for that particular project, and the comment came up that if we wanted to use him, it should be in a game where he could do all of the art. That got me thinking about what such a game would be about. He has done a lot of fantastic castles, temples, and other buildings for Legend of the Five Rings - so how about a game where every piece is a building of some sort? From there, the design came very quickly.

indigo How long have you been working on this game?
I first put together a prototype last December (2008). This has gone through the pipeline incredibly quickly.

indigo How old were you in that time?
36

indigo Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?
Mechanically, there have been minor tweaks - such as the scoring system and some specific text - but little of substance. Visually, it looks even better than I had pictured it.

indigo What do you like most about the game?
The look of the game.

Following close behind that, I really enjoy playing it, with a lot of back and forth tension going on with a lot of variety in gameplay in a very simple framework.

indigo What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?
I have been told by many people who have tried it that this is a game which they as gamers enjoy, but which is easy enough that they can get their wife / parents / mother-in-law / great aunt Minerva / non-gamer friends to play as well. This is not one for the serious strategist who wants to spend hours executing a subtle plan. Rather, it is aimed at those who enjoy a game which is very easy to learn but still has a bit of depth to it.

indigo Did the game live up to your expectation?
Absolutely. Now I am waiting to see if the sales live up to expectations as well. cool

indigo Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?
Indeed, I do. Myth: Pantheons should be going to the printer this week, and I am working on a number of possibilities for later in 2010.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
49. Board Game: Check [Average Rating:7.06 Unranked]
Alan Biggs
Canada
Calgary
Alberta
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmb
Hi, I'm Alan Biggs and I designed this game solo and then found a whole new and exciting world of friends and board games because of it!
More recently I got together with a group of local designers to form the Game Artisans of Canada. (www.gameartisans.ca)
Some of us are already published, and we have some very exciting and diverse designs in the works.

Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?
I was writing a novel to unleash my creative side and I had this idea about a pure card game based on Chess. As the thought struck me, I realized I had never heard of that before, and research proved that there really were very few products out there that came close. So I filled the gap!
I also found inspiration from some great people who encouraged me to keep going with the project.

How long have you been working on this game?
It took about 6 months to self publish the first run. I have tweaked and worked on it in various forms (including an unfinished PDA app) for quite a while.

How old were you in that time?
35-ish.

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?
Very similar to my original idea. However, the mechanics grew out of the theme as it developed.

What do you like most about the game?
I think that it successfully merges the classic themes of Chess and traditional cards, and the result is quite original. I think there is also some interesting strategic aspects to the game in a small package.

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?
I think that people who like Chess and abstracts generally like it (except perhaps the purists, because it's light strategy, and it isn't intended to be Chess in a deck of cards). I also know that math teachers and parents think it serves a role in teaching basic math and also Chess concepts to children.

Did the game live up to your expectation?
Yes, I think it did/does.

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?
My current project is a social Trivia game which everyone can get into and enjoy. I'm also working on a Euro-style property-themed game.

Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game.
I did all the artwork for the game. It's a great feeling to completely create something from idea to finished product.
My company name and BGG nickname is linked to my real name. Can you identify how?
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
50. Board Game: Two by Two [Average Rating:6.19 Overall Rank:3167]
Rob Bartel
Canada
Edmonton
Alberta
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
mbmbmbmbmb
Where did you find an inspiration for this game (theme, mechanism..)?
The idea for the game sparked from an initial thought about players moving their pieces around the outside of a gameboard and slowly carving channels inland. The gameboard very quickly became themed as a sinking island and the player's pieces as ships. At that point, I could have gone in either of two directions - looting treasure from a sinking Atlantis or rescuing animals in a Noah's Ark scenario. Rescuing animals felt like it would be more fun so that's the route I took.

How long have you been working on this game?
The initial idea and prototype came in November of 2007, I signed it with Valley Games late in 2008, and they're currently projecting a "Junish" 2010 release. The design on this one went very quickly and probably only spent 3-6 months on the front burner. I've tinkered with bits of it since, however, adding in the stinky fish bone tokens, for instance, and narrowing down an optimal number of required water tokens, etc.

How old were you in that time?
I was in my early thirties when I first invented the game.

Was the final product the same as/similar to/totally different from your original idea?
The initial game idea was remarkably workable. I removed a memory element during early playtesting but all of the other changes have been fairly incremental refinements. From a theme and mechanics standpoint, Valley Games' published version is pretty darn close to my initial vision for the game.

What do you like most about the game?
I love how light and easy the game is to get into without sacrificing strategic play over the longer term. Finding the balance between maximizing your water points and maximizing your ability to reveal the animals you need always seems to be a juicy and meaningful choice.

What kind of players do you think will enjoy the game?
The cute animals, cartoony artwork, and simple rules are definitely well-suited to children and to family gamers. Like Ticket to Ride, however, there's enough depth there to catch and hold the interest of the average BGGer and justify table time at your regular games night or at BGG.con.

Did the game live up to your expectation?
Well it's not released yet so the verdict is technically still out. That said, I think everything's falling into place like I'd hoped. The gameplay is strong, the art's turned out pretty well, Valley Games has sorted out the manufacturing problems that plagued them last year, they've lined up some solid distribution, interest in the game is beginning to pick up, etc. I'm looking forward to seeing how it fares once it's finally released.

Do you still design games? If so, can you tell us something about your current project?
Yes, I do still design games and I expect I'll continue doing so for quite some time. I currently have a wide range of projects on the go but, in general terms, I'm putting the finishing touches on a phase of lighter designs and am looking forward to sinking my teeth into some heavier Euros again, including some with some American-style touches.

Feel free to add anything interesting about you or your game.
Valley Games has posted the English-language rules to Two by Two's BGG page. Go check them out. They're currently projecting that the game will be on store shelves sometime around June so, if it sounds like your kind of game, be sure to ask your online or FLGS retailer to make sure they get it in stock.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Prev «  1 , 2 , 3  Next »   | 
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
Prev «  1 , 2 , 3  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.