An old wargamer tripping, slipping and stumbling, down Memory Lane
Steven Goodknecht
United States
Bradley
Illinois
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My first Geeklist and I have a hunch, my last. When I started this about ten months ago it wasn’t intended to be anything other than an exercise to improve my memory. I would usually just fiddle with it in the morning over a cup of coffee. In the end, I don’t think it helped my memory process too much but I was surprised at how much I was able to recall from so long ago. But it didn’t seem to do a thing for my short term memory. So while I may remember some game I played 45 years ago, don’t ask me what I had for supper last night, I haven’t a clue.

When this little saga was finished, I thought perhaps a few older gamers might also enjoy having their memories jarred. I’m sure my journey is very similar to most wargamers in my age group so please don’t expect anything earth-shattering here. I have also tried to include a bit of the history of wargames. If some of you older wargamers think I got something wrong, feel free to correct me. The thing for younger readers to bear in mind is that everything that came out back then was virtually new.

Feel free to add anything to this list from your own wargame Memory Lane. I’m sure that your story is probably more interesting than mine and I would definitely be interested in hearing it and I’m sure others would be also.

This list is humbly dedicated to the companies and designers named herein.
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51. Board Game: Fury in the West [Average Rating:6.50 Overall Rank:4294]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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"...the art of manoeuvering armies...an art which none may master by the light of nature. but to which, if he is to attain success, a man must serve a long apprenticeship." -- G.F.R. Henderson
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This was the first Civil War game I bought. I didn't know squat about the war at all (hard as it is for some to believe, I hadn't even played the old AH Gettysburg game and had played SPI's Lee Moves North, but that was it!)

I didn't appreciate it then, but I do know now how generally well this game simulated the battle as well as being a fun title to play. AH did their own edition (they had a penchant for snapping up good titles from Battleline) but there was something about the map and double-thick pieces in the older title that I missed.

There was something really solid about those old Battleline titles--in those days we had AH, SPI, and GDW as the "big three," but this company seemed to publish a number of really good titles. This was one of my favorites.
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52. Board Game: StarForce 'Alpha Centauri': Interstellar Conflict in the 25th Century [Average Rating:6.11 Overall Rank:4441]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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"...the art of manoeuvering armies...an art which none may master by the light of nature. but to which, if he is to attain success, a man must serve a long apprenticeship." -- G.F.R. Henderson
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This was my first Sci-Fi game and I fell in love with it immediately. Not only were the subdued graphics really cool and the fictional background that Redmond Simonsen seem believable to my teenaged mind, the game was outstanding! The si-move system worked better in this title than in any other I'd played and led to some really nifty feints and sudden swoops into battle. The combat results were unique as well (whether you were talking the Basic Game or the Advanced Game) and tactical battles fought on the "mini-life" map were a great deal of fun.

This game is as fresh now as it was when published--it is ageless and deserves the appellation of a true wargame "classic!" Hard to believe how old this title is--and I'd play it at the drop of a hat even today!
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53. Board Game: Dreadnought [Average Rating:5.98 Overall Rank:5934]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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I got into wargaming through naval games--my first title being the venerable AH Midway. Saw this game in the local Brentano's (Wheaton Plaza in Maryland) and heavily hinted to my mother that I wanted it for my birthday. Lo and behold, it showed up!

Thought I'd died and gone to heaven--EVERY dreadnought and post-dreadnought era battleship was in the game. Sure, we played the scenarios but the most fun we had was matching up ships we wanted to fight each other. Or at least, we thought it was fun. The combat system was so crude, it really didn't much matter between single ships unless one really heavily outclassed the other. It was really hard to sink the bigger battleships in the game.

The scenarios weren't too bad but the si-move system grew to be pretty tedious with the larger actions (e.g., Jutland). But we still played this game to death for years!

In retrospect, it wasn't much of a naval simulation or even that great of a game, but it was all we had at the time and we seemed to create our own fun around it. Soon as Quarterdeck Games released Ironbottom Sound and The Royal Navy, as well as AH's newer Bismarck (second edition)--all designed by Jack Greene--the old SPI game went into the closet never to come out again. Just sold my well-loved copy a couple of years ago.
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54. Board Game: Stalingrad [Average Rating:5.81 Overall Rank:6459]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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Surprised that nobody else has posted this one before me. This was another one of those birthday/Christmas presents I got when I was first getting into wargaming. When I got it, the only other game I had dealing with the Russian Front was PanzerBlitz. So I knew next to nothing about it.

Not that you'd learn much about it from playing this game, save for the basic geography. But we spent a lot of time trying to figure it out. The ahistorical OOB and pace of the game is legendary, but this was one of those games many of us cut our wargaming teeth on. For me, this was the first operational/strategic-level land warfare game I played. So it taught me a lot about playing these kinds of games that I took with me into other games I then got into, such as Afrika Korps and Guadalcanal.

Well remember the debates about balance--some saying the Russian replacement rate was just so high that the Germans couldn't win; others saying it just meant the Germans required greater precision to play in order to win. I never got that good to have a defendable/arguable opinion about it. All I knew is that after playing it a lot, me and my friends had a lot of very close games where it came down to the wire--and both sides seemed to win enough times for us to think it just might be balanced. But I don't really know.

The last time I played was around 1977 or 1978 or so. We started playing AH's version of The Russian Campaign and liked it so much better. The only reason I played this title that last time was because somebody saw it on my dorm room shelf and knew how to play--so we did. Turned out I was the chump in that exchange as he took the Russians and proceeded to thwart my Axis offensive in short order. It wasn't even close--I think I took one of the three cities (Leningrad) and was nowhere near Moscow or Stalingrad by the end of the game.
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55. Board Game: 1914 [Average Rating:5.62 Overall Rank:8633]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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"...the art of manoeuvering armies...an art which none may master by the light of nature. but to which, if he is to attain success, a man must serve a long apprenticeship." -- G.F.R. Henderson
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I found this game in the shrinkwrap for $6.95 at a Dart Drug in Aspen Hill Shopping Center in Maryland back in the dark days of 1975 or so. It was buried back among other, more popular, board games (like MONOPOLY). I had heard about this title and I was something of a World War I naval buff (from playing Jutland and Dreadnought), so I thought I'd pick it up. Knew it was a collector's item even back then and felt lucky to have found it. My only other experience in playing land games at the operational level was Stalingrad, Afrika Korps, Waterloo, and Guadalcanal (I'd get The Battle of the Bulge that Christmas).

You can imagine my reaction upon opening the box. It looked extremely detailed. The map was gorgeous and somewhat intimidating to my teenager eyes, but more than that were ALL THOSE PIECES to be sorted out and tracked. I was introduced to the notion of step-reduction once I grappled with the game system and this seemed to make eminent sense to me. Loved the mobilization charts and hidden movement to add suspense and tension to the game--at the time I thought this was the most realistic game I'd ever gotten into and it lured me into reading everything I could get my hands on about the First World War.

Of course, then we really started to learn how to play it and--predictably--the thing shorted to ground. Dan Psalter was running a "1914 club" of sorts via mail and I got tangentially involved; he had some rules fixes that breathed life into the game again but then it simply seemed to short to ground again. Seemed to us there was a way for the Germans to run a relentless attrition campaign against the French so that they ran out of pieces before the Germans did. What was left on the board was so weak, but--no matter--the Germans would win. Am sure someone came up with fixes to that, but by then I'd discovered Blitzkrieg and then Rise and Decline of the Third Reich so this game went into the closet. I still have it, though, and occasionally think about fixing it up! Ah, but there's now SO MANY good games on this subject these days....
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56. Board Game: Anzio [Average Rating:6.61 Overall Rank:2105]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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"...the art of manoeuvering armies...an art which none may master by the light of nature. but to which, if he is to attain success, a man must serve a long apprenticeship." -- G.F.R. Henderson
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I came to this game late (3rd Edition). By that time I had quite a lot of AH operational-level games under my belt, but none seemed to me to be as "realistic" as this one, not even the venerable 1914 or 1776. I was blown away once I opened the box, read the rules, and struggled through my first few sessions with it. It seemed to have the most innovative ground combat system of anything I'd played up to that point...and there were so many different nationalities/types of units.

As much as I played this game, I never felt like I mastered it. There have been devotees of this game (thanks to Tom Oleson who shepherded it all these years) who have, but I never felt like I even approached them. I daresay that there's never been a WW II Italian Campaign title that has met the standards of this title, much less exceeded it. So it remains a true classic in World War II operational gaming. I've got the 4th Edition now and would play it in a heart-beat, even after so many decades since it came out!
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57. Board Game: Alexander the Great [Average Rating:6.06 Overall Rank:4129]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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"...the art of manoeuvering armies...an art which none may master by the light of nature. but to which, if he is to attain success, a man must serve a long apprenticeship." -- G.F.R. Henderson
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My first ancients game and a pretty fine one to start with. Of course there wasn't much else for the period back then; most ancients fans played with miniatures.

I didn't know anything about the period, about Alexander (had heard of him at least), or the battle, but it was a blast to play. What was the most interesting to me at the time (besides all the interesting unit types and weapons) was the idea of army morale being the all-important governing factor behind taking actions in the game.

It was my fond memories of this game that got me to pick up one of the "new" games from GMT when they first started out, the very first game in the Great Battles of History series, The Great Battles of Alexander. That was EVEN better and led me off into SERIOUSLY exploring ancient warfare boardgames, even though I'd had a couple from AH on the Roman period. It all started with this stalwart title.
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58. Board Game: Caesar's Legions [Average Rating:6.05 Overall Rank:5112]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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"...the art of manoeuvering armies...an art which none may master by the light of nature. but to which, if he is to attain success, a man must serve a long apprenticeship." -- G.F.R. Henderson
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Got this game not long after I played Alexander the Great. Fortunately I had 1776 already, so I was familiar with the tactical card scheme this game employed. This was my first board wargame on the Romans and once again, this was a subject I knew nothing about.

The scenarios in the game were fascinating and got me to start reading a bit on Roman history. I soon realized that while the operational treatment in the game wasn't a bad depiction of Roman forays across the Rhine, the tactical sub-routine had nothing to do with Roman warfare of the period. But it was an unusual game for AH to publish on an unusual subject--I still have my copy!
 
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59. Board Game: Caesar at Alesia [Average Rating:7.07 Overall Rank:1483]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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"...the art of manoeuvering armies...an art which none may master by the light of nature. but to which, if he is to attain success, a man must serve a long apprenticeship." -- G.F.R. Henderson
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Got this in 1976 just as soon as it came out. After enjoying the other two AH ancients games I had--Alexander the Great and Caesar's Legions--I was psychologically disposed to go for this game. Plus the ads in THE GENERAL magazine just had my mouth watering. A "tactical donut" with Gauls breaking out from the hole in the middle and even more Gauls trying to break in from the outside? A huge board? Tons of pieces? Just had to buy this game!

It was a minor rage for quite some time, although you had to devote a long day (or two days) to play it through, provided it wasn't a blowout in the first assault. THE GENERAL had an issue devoted to the game not long after it came out, providing hugely useful tips on fortification placement and tactics for both sides, which got our learning curves up to speed pretty quickly.

This game is still really, really good...even with another title meant to supersede it. Loved seeing that red and white Caesar piece on the map with what seemed to be so few Roman cohort pieces compared to the masses of Gauls!
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60. Board Game: Starship Troopers [Average Rating:6.43 Overall Rank:1772]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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"...the art of manoeuvering armies...an art which none may master by the light of nature. but to which, if he is to attain success, a man must serve a long apprenticeship." -- G.F.R. Henderson
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I'd grown up reading science fiction novels even before I got into wargaming, so it was natural that I'd gravitate to sci-fi games when I became a wargamer. This title was the second sci-fi game I bought and played. I had read Heinlein's book and was very, very impressed by how closely the game replicated the actions and technologies in the novel.

Of course, everybody wanted to play the Mobile Infantry because they had all the cool toys and were super-soldiers. Playing "the Skinnies" in the early scenarios was akin to being a "meat puppet" in a martial arts class, at least until we figured out tactics to give the M.I. a run for their money. Playing "the bugs" was much more fun given the tunnel complexes we could design and it took time for us to figure out how to crack the layout puzzles as the M.I. player. Once we did, it seemed like it was just too hard for "the bugs" to win. Still, we enjoyed this game--particularly the later scenarios that was so reminiscent of U.S. Marines rooting Japanese out of their Pacific island caves in WW II...

Loved some of the special rules in the game--Special Talents and evacuating M.I. casualties back to the RODGER YOUNG in orbit above--once my fascination for nerve gas, tactical nukes, and other unique M.I. infantry weapons had died down some.
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61. Board Game: Air Assault On Crete/Invasion of Malta: 1942 [Average Rating:6.30 Overall Rank:2992]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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"...the art of manoeuvering armies...an art which none may master by the light of nature. but to which, if he is to attain success, a man must serve a long apprenticeship." -- G.F.R. Henderson
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I know what some people are thinking--what a bland game. Well, maybe graphically it was. But to play it was a complete nail biter. And I'm talking about the big game on Crete, not the mini-game on Malta (which I didn't like nearly so well--a lot of people disagree with me).

The Commonwealth defenders are placed face down so the German airborne doesn't exactly know what he's jumping into. Not unusual to lose a third to even up to half the force on the jump in--company after parachute company is wiped out. Survivors have to scramble "on the deck" to form up into battalions and try to take their objectives. Very unusual for Retimo or Heraklion airfields to be taken, but it happened once in a blue moon (typically in conjunction with a successful amphib operation). Maleme was more feasible. Huge tension throughout, even once the Germans are able to grab an airfield and bring in their airlanding and mountain troops! Now the Commonwealth have to evacuate their forces...and that's NO EASY TASK!

A very underappreciated game--and the best Crete game I've ever played (to include a lot of the contemporary titles).
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62. Board Game: Turning Point: The Battle of Stalingrad [Average Rating:6.45 Overall Rank:7237]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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"...the art of manoeuvering armies...an art which none may master by the light of nature. but to which, if he is to attain success, a man must serve a long apprenticeship." -- G.F.R. Henderson
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There were quite a number of games in the SPI "Division Level" series of games. Started with the old hoary Kursk: Operation Zitadelle, 4 July 1943 and included such "dogs" as The Game of France, 1940: German Blitzkrieg in the West, The Moscow Campaign, and Destruction of Army Group Center, but there were also some good to great titles such as NATO: Operational Combat in Europe in the 1970's, Breakout & Pursuit, and this title. The other games in the series, such as The East is Red: The Sino Soviet War and War in the East (First Edition), I'd classify as a "near miss."

The map is quite bland and relatively colorless and there seems to be nothing special about the game. As is the case with SPI series games on the Eastern Front, there are a lot of varying OOBs and scenarios to play with. They are interesting as solitaire exercises, but the meat behind the title are the scenarios dealing with the Soviet counteroffensive, Operation URANUS, and the German counterattack. The most interesting choice confronting players is whether to incorporate the "Hitler Idiocy" rule forbidding a breakout from the Stalingrad pocket on the first turn of the game. If you don't play with it, there's a very real chance Sixth Army will wriggle free and cut up the Soviets on the steppe!

You can still play this game on HEXWAR.com, but there's a number of other titles that have superseded it. But of all the games in this series, I'd play this one more than just about any of the other ones (save perhaps NATO: Operational Combat in Europe in the 1970's. Still a great game to break new folks into wargaming--easy to get into and easy to play, with a good bit of tension. But I'd be hard-pressed to call it a classic.
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63. Board Game: Flat Top [Average Rating:7.24 Overall Rank:1063]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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"...the art of manoeuvering armies...an art which none may master by the light of nature. but to which, if he is to attain success, a man must serve a long apprenticeship." -- G.F.R. Henderson
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For a long time, I considered AH's Midway to be the best carrier wargame ever made. The competition when I was making that judgment was pretty thin, mostly limited to SPI's flawed The Fast Carriers. Then came along this Battleline title, which was the next best thing. It had its own flaws and was relatively complex, but these were far more forgivable in this title than in the SPI monstrosity. AH picked it up and gave it a superlative physical production, but it's basically the same game that the older version provided.

Once again, Battleline had another winner of a wargame. To this day, this title remains a front-runner in WWII carrier warfare war-games and is definitely considered a classic.
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64. Board Game: The Ironclads [Average Rating:7.21 Overall Rank:2235]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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"...the art of manoeuvering armies...an art which none may master by the light of nature. but to which, if he is to attain success, a man must serve a long apprenticeship." -- G.F.R. Henderson
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First came the well-regarded Wooden Ships & Iron Men by Battleline, which was quickly acquired by Avalon Hill and given a facelift. Then came The Ironclads which was a naval brawler's game. No fancy sailing maneuvers here. It's close with the enemy and pound him into submission in the confines of a river during the U.S. Civil War. It had even more color and chrome than the sailing ship game and is highly sought after even today in the original Battleline packaging (the Excalibur version is not so nice, sadly).

Yet another naval game classic and especially valued when playing with the The Ironclads Expansion Kit to cover other nations.
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65. Board Game: Submarine [Average Rating:6.40 Overall Rank:2665]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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"...the art of manoeuvering armies...an art which none may master by the light of nature. but to which, if he is to attain success, a man must serve a long apprenticeship." -- G.F.R. Henderson
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When Battleline published this game, it didn't have quite the popularity of its other naval wargame titles. But for those of us who hankered after tactical recreations of submarine warfare, we found nirvana. This was a most interesting and amazing game, covering the full range of submarine and anti-submarine technology, national combatants for both the Atlantic and Pacific, and tactical situations. But it took a great deal of patience to play as the action seemed dull and tedious for most of the game, save for moments of absolute terror as merchant ships got taken out and/or your sub was weathering ASW attacks and hoping for the best....

Like so many other Battleline titles, AH took this one over and gave it a physical makeover. Still one of the all-time best in its genre, possibly only met--if not exceeded--by the Deadly Waters: The Gibraltar Run 1941-1942 naval miniatures system. Other games tried to copy its success at the time--notably GDW's SSN and SPI's Up Scope!, but they just weren't the same...
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66. Board Game: Air War: Modern Tactical Air Combat [Average Rating:5.09 Overall Rank:10817]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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"...the art of manoeuvering armies...an art which none may master by the light of nature. but to which, if he is to attain success, a man must serve a long apprenticeship." -- G.F.R. Henderson
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No superlatives could do justice for what this simulation (and I use that term deliberately) did for wargames on tactical aerial warfare of all periods. Air War: Modern Tactical Air Combat was hyped in the pages of STRATEGY AND TACTICS and MOVES as the end-all, be-all modern jet air warfare game, replacing the creaky Foxbat & Phantom. It definitely did that. I got mine my first freshman semester and puzzled over the rules for weekend after weekend, trying to fly my F-86 with at least some degree of competency solitaire so I could play my first match up against a MiG-15 over Korea. It took weeks to learn how to play basic jet combat using the system. But once the basic ideas behind flight were learned, it wasn't long before we were roaring over the Red River Valley in Vietnam or trying to shoot down Colonel Tomb in a USN F-4J with "Duke" Cunningham and "Willie" Driscoll.

Of course, there were the then contemporary aircraft and "wacky" situations with Smaug the dragon and UFOs. But we took this game seriously. Achieving "Honcho" status with your pilot personality was no mean feat and only one of my college wargame club ever achieved "Super Honcho" status--until a "golden BB" shot his plane down and he failed to eject....

These days, the ACM modeling is just plain crude--even cruder are the air-to-ground routines and the decision-cycle modeling. But it set a benchmark in tactical air warfare game design that has been dramatically improved upon in game systems like the Fighting Wings series and most recently Birds of Prey: Air Combat in the Jet Age. Some will wonder why anyone would play a tactical air combat game outside a flight simulator on a PC or XBOX/PS3 and the like, but some of us still do. While I'll never play this game again, I have a lot of fond memories and a real sense of accomplishment in mastering its intricate flight and combat mechanics.

TSR/SPI republished this title, but for all intents and purposes it was exactly the same game. They just put the published errata (which was significant) in the box.
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67. Board Game: Lee Moves North [Average Rating:7.11 Overall Rank:6126]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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"...the art of manoeuvering armies...an art which none may master by the light of nature. but to which, if he is to attain success, a man must serve a long apprenticeship." -- G.F.R. Henderson
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The first time I played this game, I was a bit intimidated by it. It was the first SPI game I played and I'd just started into wargaming. What...a paper map? An accordion style rulebook like Panzerblitz (oh, this must be a hard game)? "Simulations Publications Incorporated?" Sounded scary.

But I got over that. I played the Rebs in my first game and while not knowing jack about the Civil War, managed to keep the Union to the northwest of me when I emerged from the Shenandoah, so I mounted a rearguard and fell upon the Washington DC forts, narrowly taking the city before the Bluebellies tore through my rearguard to do something about it!

Yes, my opponent didn't know anything about the Civil War, either!
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68. Board Game: The Fast Carriers [Average Rating:5.76 Overall Rank:8301]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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"...the art of manoeuvering armies...an art which none may master by the light of nature. but to which, if he is to attain success, a man must serve a long apprenticeship." -- G.F.R. Henderson
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My parents saw that I loved playing my new Midway when I first got into wargaming circa 1974. So, who can blame them for spotting this game in Brentano's Bookstore and buying it for me for my birthday. Well, when I first broke into this title I was whacked over the head by all the rules and counters--it just seemed so complicated! But I doggedly kept at it, trying to learn the game. Well, it wasn't a game so much--it was a CONFLICT SIMULATION published by SIMULATIONS PUBLICATIONS, INCORPORATED!

The operational model wasn't too bad and I really appreciated the "telescoping" structure of the turn/sequence of play to carry one from the operational level to the tactical. All seemed to work okay, even without the double-blind screen that I'd gotten used to with the Avalon Hill game, given the interesting and unique rules for Task Forces and Searches/Spotting. But then--once contact was made and ships were placed on the Tactical Display to fight incoming aircraft--it was here where the game completely broke down. After several attempts, me and my buddy just gave up on it.

I think that with some tweaking, this game could work. We just didn't have the patience and experience to do it. Plus, it had taken SO MUCH EFFORT for us to learn this thing in the first place. So we went back to our beloved Midway and then to Battleline's Flat Top
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69. Board Game: Jutland [Average Rating:6.58 Overall Rank:2495]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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"...the art of manoeuvering armies...an art which none may master by the light of nature. but to which, if he is to attain success, a man must serve a long apprenticeship." -- G.F.R. Henderson
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I dreamed about this game when I first saw in the Avalon Hill Game Company catalog. I even tried to make my own version, creating ship diagrams on index cards and my own rules system for playing on the floor (it was horrible, as you might imagine from a 10th grader). But then, I finally saved enough to purchase the game. I'll never forget the day it arrived. There was a girl over at my house who liked me and we were talking that Saturday when the UPS truck pulled up and the game arrived. She left just minutes after that because it was obvious where my affections truly lay.

Played the bejeezus out of this game. Lots of fond memories that even Dreadnought could not erase. For one thing, the suspense of plotting ship courses on the pad, worrying about contact too early and the like, was awesome. The other was that the tactical game was just soooo cool. I didn't know jack about naval miniatures, but this game got me interested in them. Loved playing every bit of it.

Just sold my well-loved copy a few years ago since it was clear that with Fear God and Dread Nought rules I was never going to play this beast again. But what a great time this game was--definitely got my money's worth!
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70. Board Game: Gettysburg (1977 Edition) [Average Rating:5.61 Overall Rank:8309]
Eric Walters
United States
Chesterfield
Virginia
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"...the art of manoeuvering armies...an art which none may master by the light of nature. but to which, if he is to attain success, a man must serve a long apprenticeship." -- G.F.R. Henderson
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I played Terrible Swift Sword with some friends of mine but wasn't all that enthralled with the game, given what little history I knew of the battle. So when AH came out with this version, I figured I'd do a little "one-upmanship" with it. Little did I know.

Now, the basic game was pretty much a yawner--the best was the intermediate game on that gorgeous map. The advanced game was, for me at least, unplayable. It wasn't that the system wasn't good. In fact, I thought it was far better than TSS, particularly regarding the issue of unit frontages. No, the problem was counter/marker congestion on the map. Had the map been created to cover three times the size that came with the game, I think it would have been a home run for Avalon Hill and people would remember it instead of TSS. But alas, it was not to be!

This game had such promise....
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