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Glory II: Across the Rappahannock» Forums » Reviews

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Andrew C
United States
San Marcos
California
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1. Components/aesthetics: The game really shines here. One of my pet peeves is that I like large counters. They look better, they are easier to read, and I can pick them up easily. Glory’s infantry counters are 5/8” versus the standard ½”. It sounds like a small difference, but it has a significant impact in my mind. Some of the auxiliary pieces (cavalry and artillery) retain the ½” counters, so when they are stacked with the larger infantry, you can clearly see what is in the stack. The artwork on the counters is excellent, and the maps (though paper) have clean, clear terrain art. Each counter has a picture of a soldier aiming his weapon, with a field of gray or blue in the background (for confederate and union, obviously). Each unit also has a colored band across the top, so each unit’s parent organization (corps) is easily identified. The rules and charts are clear and concise. Two other aspects of the game that I like are: 1) it uses a minimal number of markers, which is another pet peeve of mine. (All the nice artwork on the counters is useless if it is covered in markers…it also facilitates quicker play since you aren’t constantly looking under markers for units’ strength etc.) 2) the stacking limit is low (two units per hex).

Components/aesthetics: 10 out of 10.


2. Rules/mechanics: Here too, in my opinion, the game is solid. The rules are clear and relatively brief (for a wargame) at about 12 pages. The game uses a random activation mechanic that retains a significant level of tension throughout the game. Here’s how it works: as I noted above, each unit has a colored band denoting the corps too which it belongs. At the beginning of each turn, one or two markers per corps (for both sides) are placed in a cup. One marker is randomly drawn, and the drawn corps can move/fight. The is a great mechanic that admirably serves three purposes: 1) it keeps downtime for each player very brief as you don’t need to wait for your opponent to move his entire army 2) it supports solo play well since you don’t know who is moving next 3) it keeps tension high due to the unpredictability of the turn order.

Once a corps is selected for movement, its units follow a move/fight turn sequence. Facing matters (you can only shoot into the three hex sides that the unit “faces.”) ZOC’s are locking. Once adjacent, combat is not mandatory, but if a unit chooses to attack, it must attack everyone in its front arc. Covering fire allows one unit to use “suppressing fire” to meet this requirement while the main force concentrates fire on one unit.

The actual combat is pretty straightforward, and does not degenerate into large odds calculations since the number of factors involved is usually quite manageable. Each unit is rated on combat strength (used for attack and defense) and cohesion (basically morale, also used to adjust both attack and defense). During the attack resolution, the defender fires first, rolling a 10 sided die. If he rolls higher than the attacker’s cohesion, the attacker is disorder (the unit is flipped over, no marker required) and that unit cannot attack. If the attacker survives, it attacks, rolling the d10, modified up if its cohesion and/or combat strength is greater than the defender’s (it is also adjusted for terrain and other factors). On a 5 or higher the defender retreats and makes a cohesion check (it rolls a d10, if it comes up higher than its own cohesion it becomes disordered and is flipped over). A second disorder results removes the unit from the board, though there is a chance they can later be rallied.

There are, of course, other rules for cavalry charges, artillery, night turns, etc. If you’re interested in learning about them after reading this much, you can download the rulebook from GMT’s site.

Rules/mechanics: 8 out of 10

3. Summary/impressions: As you can surely tell, I really like this game. It is fairly simple to learn and teach, which makes it playable (a rather important consideration for a game!) It looks great, and models what is, in my view, the most interesting battle of the Civil War (Chancellorsville represents Jackson and Lee at their audacious best…dividing their inferior force twice in the face of the enemy in order to respond to, and outflank, Hooker’s own flank attack). It is simple, and scalable. The small scenarios are played on one map and can be concluded in a single night, the larger scenarios include all three 22”x34” maps and hundreds of combat units (with few markers). And finally, those with limited time to study new rule sets get a lot of bang for your buck here. Not only are there two battles in the box, but you can also pick up the first, and upcoming 3rd installment of the Glory series, as well as the several installments in the very similar Triumph and Glory (Napoleonic) line.

Overall: 9 out of 10
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Jim Getzen
United States
Sarasota
Florida
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Good review -- thanks.

Now I need to muster to strength to resist purchasing it!
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Richard H. Berg
United States
South Carolina
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Getzen wrote:
Good review -- thanks.

Now I need to muster to strength to resist purchasing it!


Resistance, my son, is futile . . . and, "Cleits", thanx for the kind comments. Glad you are enjoying the game.

RHB
 
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Alan Sutton
Australia
Moruya
NSW
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Seriously informative review. Thanks a lot.

I should just add that the Jours de Gloire Series is a nice addition to the games that fans of these rules can enjoy.


 
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Scipio O.
United States
Oakland
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Moruya23 wrote:
I should just add that the Jours de Gloire Series is a nice addition to the games that fans of these rules can enjoy.


Could you please explain - or point to something about - the relationship?
 
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Alan Sutton
Australia
Moruya
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Scipio Oaklandus wrote:
Moruya23 wrote:
I should just add that the Jours de Gloire Series is a nice addition to the games that fans of these rules can enjoy.


Could you please explain - or point to something about - the relationship?



The systems are related. They both have chit pull activations. The combat system is the same.

I think the chronological sequence of the development of this rules system was -

Glory

Glory II: Across the Rappahannock

Glory III

Triumph & Glory: Battles of the Napoleonic Wars 1796-1809

Borodino: Battle of the Moskova, 1812

Jours de Gloire Series

This is only what I have figured out reading up on these games. They are all similar. They have some minor differences but these are mostly for period appropriateness.

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