$10.00
Recommend
35 
 Thumb up
 Hide
10 Posts

Quo Vadis?» Forums » Reviews

Subject: What you need to know and what people think about Quo Vadis? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Ender Wiggins
msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Quo Vadis? is a popular Knizia negotiation game. Players are politicians, trying to advance through various committees with the help of the support of their opponents. Can you negotiate with and manipulate your fellow players to reach the Senate with the most prestige?

After playing this game and discussing it with a fellow gamer, I've scoured the personal comments (and also skimmed through the reviews), and carefully organized some key quotations to bring you the important things you need to know and what other people think about Quo Vadis. Perhaps you could call this a kind of "consensus of opinion" - biased of course, because I'm the one who gets to pick the quotes to include. Nevertheless, here you have it, an at-a-glance overview of some of the majority opinions that you need to know about this game.

NB: For more reviews like this, see this list.



1. Quo Vadis? is a Knizia game themed on Roman politics that revolves around pure negotiation and deal-making
"One of the best short, pure negotiation games out there."
"A wonderful abstract representation of bureaucracy, with such interesting negotiation possibilities."
"If you like backstabbing, you will LOVE this game."
"This game has one of the most fun negotiation systems ever."
"With Chinatown and Traders of Genoa, my favorite of the deal-making games."
"One of Knizia's best. Negotiation and back-stabbing to the extreme!"
"One of the best negotiation games out there."
"Excellent negotiation game. These types of games aren't about making the best moves, they're about arguing your position more effectively than others."
"One of the best negoatation games going. A fair balance of a strategic choices, shrewd dealmaking, and charismatic interpersonal manipulating."

2. It is easier to learn than most negotiation games, and features a very elegant game that combines simple rules with satisfying gameplay.
"Very simple rules, just enough that the game works and great, great gameplay."
"It's quick, the rules are simple, and it offers an interesting mix of negotiation and strategic play. It works well for a mix of gamers and non-gamers, as anyone can play this game well on their first attempt."
"Light and quick, easy to teach, great layout. Very elegant and fun. It is not surprising that Knizia used Occam's razor to slice away all the superfluous extras that come with these kinds of games."
"This game just about defines elegance: simple seeming but incredibly deep."
"Just you, your mates, a few game components and some bare-bones rules. If you want a quick-playing game determined entirely by skill and deal-making, give this one a shot."
"I was surprised at how easy to learn it was."
"Negotiation stripped to its barest bones. Too minimalistic for me. No excess chrome just brutal dry negotiation for chances to score VPs. Too dry and mechanical."
"This game seemed a bit on the dry side when I played it, and while I appreciate the austere simplicity and elegance of the system, I wonder how much life can ever be infused into such a Knizia-esque math equation."
"It provides all sorts of interesting negotiations in a scant 60 minutes with very little rules overhead. That doesn't make it a simple game though since the scope of deals to be made are very wide."
"Even though the rules are simple, there is a surprising "depth" to the game once you start playing."

3. It is quicker to play than most negotiation games.
"The game plays quickly which is perfect for its weight."
"It also plays faster than any game of its ilk that I've encountered, with a far greater fun/duration ratio!"
"A quick filler negotiation game. Not very many games fall in this particular category!"
"Quo Vadis? packs quite a bit of negotiation into a very short, accessible package. There is a lot of game packed into half an hour."
"Finishes quickly, too quickly if anything, often leaving you wanting to play again."
"Do you like Diplomacy? Do you wish you could play it in 45 minutes? Than Quo Vadis is for you. All the backstabbing, and conniving of Diplomacy in a manageable 45 minute at most game."
"If you're looking for a relatively quick game where you don't have to wait a long time in between your turns, Quo Vadis? is a good choice."
"For a lighter, quicker game with meaty negotiations and good tactical depth, this is great."
"Negotiations, king making, threats of king making, and backstabbing jam packed in 30 minutes. If this game was longer, it would probably drive me nuts, but being 30-45 minutes, makes this game an absolute blast."
"Very quick for a negotiation game, which is a rarity."
"Plays very quickly, not suffering from interminable discussions."

4. It is not as vicious as most negotiation games
"It has the wheeling and dealing in Diplomacy without the burden of betrayal. What's more, a session takes a little more than an hour!"
"It's one of the "nicer" negotiation games, nasty-wise."
"Surprisingly quick, light, painless, fun negotiation game that you can play with your friends without coming to hate one another."
"Well streamlined negotiation game which seems to suffer less from backstabbing than games like Diplomacy or Intrigue."
"Negotiation for the nice types."
"Starts off pretty laid back and ends up pretty cutthroat as the endgame looms."
"A diplomacy game that won't end a friendship."
"Deals are binding for one full round, which takes out a lot of the "How do I know I can trust you?" aspects and puts everyone on a level playing field. ... if you aren't a huge fan of anything-goes negotiations that end friendships and breakup families. If you like the idea of negotiation but you don't like typical negotiation games then give this a try you might love it."
"Excellent tool for budding gamers to learn the ropes of negotiating with others. Feels similar to Diplomacy in this regard, without the treachery and lingering bitterness that game can engender."
Note that Mayfair seems to have changed a rule about how long deals are binding, as discussed here: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/341855

5. Since it is a negotiation game, the game-play and fun factor will largely depend on the personalities of the players.
"One of those games that is great depending on who do you play with."
"Pure negotiation. A lot of fun with the right crowd."
"Clever little game, that only really comes alive when players throw themselves into negotiations and dealing."
"One that relies extremely heavily on the players involved. If I were to play this with 4 players who simply will not negotiate flat-out, then this game falls flat. If, on the other hand, you find yourself surrounded by socialites who would like to try their hand at a proper negotiation game, then give this one a shot."
"Depending on the players, this one could range from dull to exciting."
"Very dry, but as long as everyone enjoys negotiating the game plays well."
"How much fun you're going to have with it really depends on the group; it's by no means a party game, but if the players are too quiet or unwilling to negotiate it will be a rather dreary experience."
"This zero-sum game is all about deal-making. The problem is that when you lose, you know exactly who to blame. So it's not a good game to play with friends and family who might take their losses personally."
"With the right wheeling and dealing crowd this game provides some of my favorite gaming memories. With other crowds, it's only ok."
"Extremely group-dependent...if you don't have a pool of negotiating-types to choose from, give it a pass. But if you do game with such folk, then this is indeed a lot of fun."

6. To be best enjoyed, a minimum of four players is needed, preferably five.
"Need at least 4, and preferably 5 to play well."
"Definitely best with 5-players, not recommended with only 3."
"Do not play this with just three players!"
"Best played with five players."
"Very fun game with 4 or more players, wouldn't recommend it with 3 players though."

7. The extra chits and optional/advanced rules that come with the game likely do not improve it.
"Don't play with the 'advanced' rules (the chits), they give players to much control and make negotiation unnecessary."
"The optional extra chits add to the game, but can cause some friction."
"I don't like the extra tokens that come with the game, the basic game is better, since it keeps the negotiation factor strong."
"The chits with extra votes and such detracts too much from the negotiation part."

8. The components are one of the game's weak points.
"Elegant but extremely clever system isn't helped by mediocre components and board. Cries out for a more thematic board treatment."
"Boring theme and ugly presentation."
"Knizia does an ultra light-negotiation game coupled with tactical placement of strange looking plastic meeples. Not a bad game. Looks pug ugly though."
"As with most Mayfair games, components are inferior to their contemporaries."

.
.


9. The bottom line: what you need to know

If you enjoy negotiation games and have a group of four or five players that enjoys them too, Quo Vadis is an excellent choice for quick and easy-to-learn game that offers pure negotiation without the long playing time or viciousness that accompanies most other negotiation games.



Note: What does the title of the game mean? Don't miss my article:
What kind of nonsense is this? A Pictorial Review of Board Game Latin


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
mb The complete list of Ender's "What you need to know and what people think about..." reviews:
http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/37595
Subscribe to this list to be notified when new reviews are posted.
12 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Just call me Erik
United States
Waldorf
Maryland
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
Two QV reviews? Cheeky. I like this review format. It's sort of "Review by committee", which I suppose is appropriate
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Kandrac
United States
Grand Prairie
TX
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Enjoyable read! I traded away my copy of QV simply because a five player game of this type is hard to get to the table, but the design has always intrigued me.

Gg
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Anthony DuLac
United States
Blaine
Minnesota
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
I don't recall this very well but the game seemed broken when we played it. According to the rules and the layout, it was possible to get stuck (iirc). Dumped it right away in disappointment.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
J C Lawrence
United States
Campbell
California
flag msg tools
designer
wytefang wrote:
I don't recall this very well but the game seemed broken when we played it. According to the rules and the layout, it was possible to get stuck (iirc). Dumped it right away in disappointment.


It is entirely possible for a player to die almost immediately simply because no other player will cooperate with their initiatives. You cannot succeed in Quo Vadis without other player's explicit and ongoing cooperation and hat cooperation is not enforced by the game rules. It is up to the other players to freely determine whether or not to cooperate. This is a major strength and positive selling point of the game.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Just call me Erik
United States
Waldorf
Maryland
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
clearclaw wrote:
wytefang wrote:
I don't recall this very well but the game seemed broken when we played it. According to the rules and the layout, it was possible to get stuck (iirc). Dumped it right away in disappointment.


It is entirely possible for a player to die almost immediately simply because no other player will cooperate with their initiatives. You cannot succeed in Quo Vadis without other player's explicit and ongoing cooperation and hat cooperation is not enforced by the game rules. It is up to the other players to freely determine whether or not to cooperate. This is a major strength and positive selling point of the game.


In what seems almost a reversal of natural law, I agree with JC. This is a negotiation game, and like all negotiation games, it's possible to get yourself embargoed out of the dealings. That said, if you know you're going to get hammered, there are a couple things you can try:

1. Make sweeter deals. If you make a bunch of deals that people take because it's to their advantage, it'll help you get ahead and into a place where you can start to look after your own interests more closely. That said, it's possible to win without making a single deal that's in your favor.

2. Concentrate new senators on one or two committees. Having the majority of seats in opening committees means you'll have some bargaining power, at least at some level. At the very least, it'll let you vote yourself into a higher level committee.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adam Skinner
United States
Seven Hills
Ohio
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks Ender. This format was very helpful.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Josh Adelson
United States
Columbia
South Carolina
flag msg tools
Well, I see the otherness of being other is otherwise contraindicated
badge
Who cares where it came from or whether it's correct or not? Certainly not me
mbmbmbmbmb
Yay, I'm glad that the lack of attribution policy at BGG continues on unabated. While I appreciate the distillation of ratings comments for those little chicks who can't digest their own food, there is something to be said for just letting people read the comments themselves, so that they can't be tricked into some bias introduced by scurrilous reviewers who simply quote others who've made the key points they wish to convey. For example, 673,287 distinct BGG comments on Quo Vadis? said that their commentees would never again play the game with more than 3 players, and that 3 players was the optimal configuration. Why didn't we get to hear about THAT? It's a conspiracy.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bryan Maxwell
United States
Burtchville
Michigan
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
They had this for $8 at the Mayfair booth at Gen Con this year. I didn't buy it. I'm such a shit.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Flood
United States
Oakland
California
flag msg tools
designer
mbmbmbmbmb
MisterCranky wrote:
For example, 673,287 distinct BGG comments on Quo Vadis? said that their commentees would never again play the game with more than 3 players, and that 3 players was the optimal configuration. Why didn't we get to hear about THAT?


673,287 comments?! Where is this number coming from? There are just over 500 comments on this game, and that's over a year after this reply was posted.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.