$10.00
Recommend
203 
 Thumb up
 Hide
30 Posts
1 , 2  Next »   | 

Hive» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Hive - A Detailed Review rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: Review [+] Images [+] [View All]
I am on a Journey...
Australia
Lavington
New South Wales
flag msg tools
...to explore and discover games of all shapes and sizes regardless of colour, condition or creed
mbmbmbmbmb

Image Courtesy of Purple

This review continues my series of detailed reviews that attempt to be part review, part resource for anyone not totally familiar with the game. For this reason I expect readers to skip to the sections that are of most interest.

Summary

Game Type - Abstract Game (Tile)
Play Time: 10-40 minutes
Number of Players: 2
Mechanics - Tile Placement, Modular Board
Difficulty - Pick-up & Play (Can be learned in under 15 minutes)
Components - Excellent ++
Release - 2001

Designer - John Yianni (Army of Frogs, Logan Stones)

Overview

In Hive each player is attempting to trap (surround) their opponent's Queen Bee in order to win. To achieve this both sides must utilise a range of hexagonal tiles that feature a variety of insects, each with their own special movement abilities. By placing tiles into the play area a Hive is formed by the pieces themselves and the challenge of the game is to manipulate the hive and its many moving parts to gain the upper hand.

The Components

Hive is a classic abstract game in that it utilises the bare minimum of components. In all only 22 pieces are required for game play.

d10-1 Bakelite Tiles - These are not only the most important components...they are the only components. Each side receives 11 hexagonal tiles made from Bakelite (you gotta love Bakelite...it feels so nice)! One set of tiles come in black and the other in white (sometimes off white depending on the copy you bought) and this only strengthens the game's abstract nature.

Each tile features an iconic representation of an insect type. These designs are coloured differently for each insect and the design is engraved or etched into the Bakelite, so fading over time will not be an issue.

Each side receives the exact same make-up of insects and they include -

1 Queen Bee
2 Beetles
2 Spiders
3 Grasshoppers
3 Soldier Ants

It is important to note that earlier versions of the game featured wooden tiles with 'stick-on' decals but to my knowledge the Bakelite version is now the 'standard' and really the 'must have' version.

These tiles are simply gorgeous. To those with 'tactile tendencies' they are wonderful to feel and many a gamer will idly fondle a piece as they contemplate their next move. The iconic design also has a classic look.


Image Courtesy of kilroy_locke


d10-2 Tray Insert - I don't normally mention the tray insert but will here as it has more relevance than usual. The insert in theory is a good design as it allows the hex tiles to be nicely stored. However it appears that in most (if not all cases) the insert seems to crack in 2 or more corners. For this reason...


Image Courtesy of Pionek


d10-3 Travel Bag - ...the inclusion of the travel bag is excellent. Circular in nature and made from a sturdy canvas type material, the travel bag allows all tiles to be stored neatly. Its size allows it to fit inside the box or it can be placed on a shelf without the box as this looks visually pleasing too. In short an owner has the option to throw away the insert tray and keep the box or simply throw away both and use the travel bag if space is an issue.


Image Courtesy of zombiegod


d10-4 Rules - Like any good abstract game, the rule set is pretty minimal. This allows the rules to fit on a double sided leaflet and they are well presented with diagrammatical examples.

In all Hive is presented at a high standard and even the most fussy of game players would tip their hat to the production values present in Hive.

The Game Play

As mentioned earlier the aim of Hive is to completely surround your opponent's Queen Bee (all 6 sides). It does not matter what the colour of those pieces are (white or black) therefore it is entirely legitimate for victory to be achieved by using a player's own insects against them!

d10-1 Set-Up - The beauty of hive is that the set-up involves nothing more than taking the pieces out of the box or bag and each player taking their coloured tiles. The game is now ready to go!

d10-2 Basic Play - On a given player's turn they are allowed to do one of two things. They can add a new tile to the table, which expands the size and structure of the Hive, or they can move one of their own pieces already in the Hive.

d10-3 Adding a New Tile - This is as simple as taking a tile from a player's supply and adding it to the play area. Like any good abstract there are of course restrictions. A tile must be placed such that it does not touch an opponent's tile and it must connect to a tile that the active player already has in play (the newly placed tile cannot be placed in isolation). Please note that this rule must be broken on the very first turn as no tiles exist for a given player at that time.

The player going second must also break the rule regarding a newly placed tile not touching an opponent's tile, but these last 2 points are the exception.

It is also important to note that each player must have placed their Queen Bee tile by no later than their 4th turn.

d10-4 Moving a Tile - But this is where the action really takes place. Moving a tile requires a player to move any one tile of their colour according to that Insect's movement rules. Tiles that are moved are allowed to touch any tiles in play. There are then three important considerations regarding movement.

* - A player cannot begin to move tiles until their Queen Bee is in play.

* - A tile is free to move only if it is able to slip out of its current position. If a piece can only move in such a way that it is required to slide (all but the Grasshopper move by sliding) and doing so would require other tiles to be pushed out of position, then the move is illegal. This will not be the case for pieces such as the Grasshopper, which can hop.

* - The other critical rule is known as the 'One Hive Rule'. It dictates that a move cannot result in the Hive being split into two or more separate parts. This rule is super important and allows the players to strategically maneuver into positions that limit the options of their opponent!

But the fun stuff is really in those Insect abilities! Numbers in brackets denote how many tiles of that type each player has.

d10-5 Beetle (2) - The Beetle is a slow but clever insect. It can only move one space per turn but it has the ability to move up onto other tiles. Doing so covers the tile underneath and this renders that tile immobile and inactive (its player cannot use it in any way until the Beetle moves). Therefore the Beetle is a highly important piece as it can nullify an opponent's key pieces and get into positions that other pieces cannot get to easily due to the 'sliding rule'.


Image Courtesy of richardsgamepack


It is also possible for another Beetle to clamber onto a Beetle already on top of another piece. Height is not relevant to movement, so it is possible for all 4 Beetles to be on top of one another.


Image Courtesy of Krisjohn


The final important note is that a Beetle tower is regarded to be the colour of the tile that is on top. This is an important consideration for placing new tiles as a player can not place a new tile that touches an opponent's tile.

d10-6 Spider (2) - The Spider is the most confusing piece to understand when learning but in truth it isn't that difficult. The Spider is allowed to move exactly 3 spaces and it must move in a direct path (that doesn't mean straight line but it does mean it can't move back on itself). It must also ensure that it is connected to at least one other tile at all times.

d10-7 Grass Hopper (3) - These little guys do exactly what you would expect, they can hop over pieces. They can hope to the next adjacent space along a straight row of joined pieces. This makes them perfect for filling in a gap in the central area of a Hive that may have been vacated by another piece. The Grasshopper is the only piece that does not move in a sliding fashion.

d10-8 Soldier Ants (3) - The most versatile insect in the game, the Soldier Ant has unlimited movement. It can move to any other position in and around the Hive, however it must use a sliding action when moving. This brings into play the article outlined in Point 4 above. A Soldier Ant cannot move if it requires the dislodging of other tiles, therefore these tiles can be pinned down with clever play.

d10-9 Queen Bee (1) - The head honcho of the hive is obviously the most important as she represents the victory condition. Unfortunately she can only move one space per turn and does not have the Beetle's ability to move up onto other pieces. In reality she moves much like the King from Chess, which I think is a nice irony.

So What's the Buzz! (the Appeal)

Hive is one heck of a clever game and as a general rule I do not like abstracts.

d10-1 Strategic Depth - This is perhaps the most important value that helps set the game apart from other modern additions to the Abstract Genre - its got game! The combination of the Insect movement rules, the Placement rules and the 'One Hive Rule' create a set of options that allow the players to set traps, make the killer move and find ways out of impossible situations. These elements are what made games like Chess and Go so popular for hundreds of years and for Hive to replicate those features in a uniquely modern design (no cheap rip-offs here) is a feat John Yianni should be proud of.

d10-2 The Changing Face... - One element that helps Hive stand out from classic abstract game design is it's board or playing surface. Whilst Chess and Go (as two examples) are restricted to a linear board, Hive's very design allows it to change, develop and mutate as the play unfolds. This element, regardless of everything else the game offers, makes it truly unique and lends the game a high re-playability factor.

d10-3 Max Game / Min Rules - One of the things I cannot help but admire about quality abstracts, is that they manage to create endless possibilities with a minimal rule set. This then allows the players to devote more brain matter to 'what is possible' rather than remembering an obscure rule that may bring victory. Hive does this brilliantly and the result is a game where you can devote 100% thought to out-thinking your opponent, which even I find most satisfying.

d10-4 Short Learning Curve - In the learning stage it is quite common for silly mistakes to be made, resulting in one player taking the win (although this often results in a quick "Doh! I want to try that again"). But very quickly player's can adapt to the elegant rules of Hive and with 3-5 games under a person's belt they can be competitive.

d10-5 A Fighting Chance - One of the problems with Chess is that pieces can be eliminated. The implication of this is that one side becomes weaker and at some point may be fighting a losing battle. The potential for Stale Mate is one of the more frustrating features of Chess. Hive on the other hand has largely eliminated this problem as neither player can lose pieces, although they can be nullified for a time with the Beetle or clever tile positioning.

d10-6 Time Frame - The game can take anywhere from 10-40 minutes depending on the player's familiarity with the rules and the skill levels of both players. At this time requirement, Hive offers a heck of a lot of game for the investment required.

d10-7 Value - That last point goes for the price to. Hive is really quite a cheap game considering the quality of the components and the hours of enjoyment it can provide.

d10-8 Classy -

Image Courtesy of ralfchr
Everything about Hive is pretty classy. It has a great look thanks to the Bakelite and it is no surprise that the game has almost 250 images on the Geek (at time of writing) as it is very photogenic. So much so that I could easily see people setting up the tiles on coffee tables as a nice artistic centerpiece.

As a player of Chess in my youth, I also appreciate the timeless classic look that Hive has as an abstract. Using the black and white that humans commonly associate with Chess/Go and using movement rules as the driving force behind the game, Hive deserves a lofty position in the genre of Abstract Games.

In a sense Hive could be regarded as taking the core nature of Chess and infusing it with the Euro concept of no player elimination.

Please note that a Tie is possible in Hive but it is fairly rare and can only take place if a single piece moves to occupy a position that closes the loop around both Queen Bees simultaneously.

d10-9 Theme - Believe it or not this abstract does a great job of living up to its theme. The insect's movement rules actually do a really great job in replicating the movements of their real world counterparts. The Soldier Ants have the ability to scurry, the Spider weaves a mesmerizing path as it maneuvers through the Hive and the Beetles clamber around and onto things.

An extension of this is that the Hive is in constant flux, forever evolving. I would actually love to see a Hive game captured using 'motion capture' techniques as I think the result would be stunning.

d10-1d10-0 Versatility - The combination of Bakelite tiles and the Travel Bag lends Hive one final advantage, it can be played anywhere. Going to the beach? Great take it along as the sand won't hurt it at all!

What's Not to Like

Well I really don't have too much to offer here except to say that Abstract Haters should move along. I guess Hive only allows for 2 Players so it won't meet the needs of large group gatherings all that well, but other than that I think every Gamer should give Hive a go and judge for themselves.

The Final Word

I don't usually do this sort of thing but here we go. This is my 240th review here on the Geek and I've never felt the need to single out a game like I am about to do for Hive.

I really think that Hive represents a major achievement in gaming. If we look at the pinnacle of games in its Genre, it would be fair to say that nothing has come close to games like Chess and Go for Hundreds of years. I honestly think that Hive can hold its head high in that company and in some respects even surpasses them (Chess at least - I haven't played Go) as it suffers fewer negative aspects.

Why haven't I felt the need to make similar comments about Euro or Conflict Games? Well I guess I largely see them as fairly common in relation to their use of mathematics, scoring models and key mechanics. What tends to separate one from another is the use of theme and these aren't too hard to take from popular culture and historical events. Somehow they seem easier to think up and conceptualise than an abstract game. Feel free to shoot me here.

At the time of writing this review, Hive had amassed just over 21,000 plays in 7-8 years, which represents approximately 2,500 logged plays a year on the Geek alone. This is an amazing number for a modern day abstract game to achieve and I think it speaks to the quality and wide appeal that the game possesses.

Enough waxing lyrical from me. Kudos to John Yianni for his design.

NB - For the record given the nature of my comments above I think it is important to note that I have no connection to the production of Hive, Gen 42 Games or John Yianni

Links

For a full list of my 300+ reviews in a search-able Geeklist -

My Review Geeklist for Easy Reference

Links - To other Abstract Games

d10-1 On the Dot

d10-2 Hive: The Mosquito

d10-3 Army of Frogs

d10-4 Logan Stones

d10-5 Pick 'n' Pack

d10-6 Kogworks

d10-7 Ubongo

d10-8 Streetsoccer

d10-9 Polarity

EDIT - Updated the visual appeal, added release date and designer credits
  • [+] Dice rolls
John Yianni
United Kingdom
Potters Bar
Hertfordshire
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
mbmbmbmbmb
Wow! what a wonderful review, you have done an amazing job in bringing to the surface the things I love about Hive.
It makes me want to go out and buy a copy
20 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Ian Wakeham
United Kingdom
Chester
Cheshire
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Excellent review of one of my favourite games.

I completely agree with you when you say that it "represents a major achievement in gaming". I often see it as a great way of introducing kids to some of the concepts of Chess, Go and other abstracts - not that this implies that it's in any way a children's game; far from it. Also, unlike the pieces in Chess and Go which my three and one year old could easily break and/or swallow - the pieces in Hive are virtually indestructible and are great for teething - without the risk of choking!
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Anders Olin
Finland
Vasa
flag msg tools
Justice for the 96!
mbmbmbmbmb
The ants never walk alone!
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Stephen Gidney
Singapore
Singapore
flag msg tools
NEVER IN THE FIELD OF CARDBOARD CONFLICT HAS ANYONE WAITED SO LONG AS FOR TOTAL WAR
mbmbmbmbmb
That's a really first-class review of a first-class game. My daughter got this for Christmas and we're just starting to get to grips with the subtle strategies in this "10 minutes to learn - lifetime to master" game. BTW in most of the wargames I play the "ants" are the weak supporting unis - in this one they are the tough guys!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Wei Jen Seah
Singapore
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Awesome review geekbuddy, now you're really making me itch for my copy which I've ordered from Boards and Bits...
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
tom moughan
United States
Rochester
New York
flag msg tools
ahh....I love the smell of a stack of sketchily placed animals in the morning!
mbmbmbmbmb
I appreciate how many reviews I have seen of late for this game -- I have been passionate about it since I first played it..and it was one of the games that got me back into gaming in a big way. And though not everyone likes abstracts, its been a real hit with non-gamers...and I mean NON gamers.

I regrettably wanted started to write a review about this game and have never fully launched it onto the web as I intended. However, if you really enjoy this game and you are on Facebook, please join the group for the game that is there. I am blocked from FB at work..so I can't supply a URL. John Yianni, the game's creator, is a member of the group.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pasta Batman
United States
Tustin
California
flag msg tools
mbmb
Great review. Just curious - is your personal rating of '8' up to date? I was expecting a 9 or 10 after reading this.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Snowball
Belgium
n/a
flag msg tools
Gender: pot*ato. My opinion is an opinion.
mbmbmbmbmb
I think you are right in your exxageration
Hive definitely has the feel of a classic; I doubt it can reach the same status than Chess, but this is because its status among other geeky game; it is classy, can be played anywhere by anyone, so the potential is there.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Claudio Campuzano
United States
Portland
Oregon
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Great review. This game has only been on the outskirts of my radar. I know I've read other reviews, but none that was able to get it on my wishlist. Yours has done that and more. I'm almost ready to head out and pick it up on my lunch hour!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
I am on a Journey...
Australia
Lavington
New South Wales
flag msg tools
...to explore and discover games of all shapes and sizes regardless of colour, condition or creed
mbmbmbmbmb
Thanks folks for the feedback. I always get a little worried before writing an abstract review as I know these games are not my forte.

John thanks for dropping a comment - It's always nice when a designer takes the time.

Pasta Batman - Cheers for the enquiry. Yeah my score of 8 is up to date. I appreciate Hive for what it has achieved. I do this as a Games Lover. This allows me to write a positive review such as this one.

My personal gaming tastes however mean I won't grab a game like Hive off the shelf to play before something else like Stone Age, History of the World or Last Night on Earth. Hence the rating of 8.

I guess the score I give Hive represents the separation I can make between my 'analyst self' and 'gamer self'.

Having said that I know that Hive is an underplayed game in my collection and deserves more attention. It's the same reason I haven't bought Khet: The Laser Game yet. It too is a cool game but for some reason it wouldn't get played as much as it should.

For the record I've probably played Hive around 20 times but it was back in the day before I found the Geek so they were never logged.

GeekGeek - It's nice to know I've given you the shakes until the order arrives...you got this gaming 'bug' bad.

Havoc - Yeah I agree that it never will be regarded in the same breath as Chess as it (chess) simply has too long a history.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Drew Spencer
United States
Tucson
Arizona
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
This review took Hive from a "Love to have" to a "Must have" for me. It's been on my radar, but everything you wrote here just says, "DREW, YOU WILL LOVE EVERYTHING ABOUT THIS GAME."
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
I played the Pepperoni Game! Came close but no cigar...
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
I am a Talking Aviator? I say, whatever shall they think of next? Anyone up for a game, then? Tally Ho!!
mbmbmbmbmb
Wow, Neil you have outdone even yourself with this review! I thought about reviewing Hive a while ago and thought, no, I have nothing new to offer... You do! Thanks.

I have been playing Hive since exactly June 2008 and have logged 80+ games -- I'll play it anywhere with anyone. One thing I have noticed, though, is that draws seem to become more and more common with experience. I have a couple tough opponents where a draw is about all either of us can expect after a good struggle. (not unlike Liverpool's season so far this year, but I won't say that with my "outside voice". Ooops, did I?)
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
I am on a Journey...
Australia
Lavington
New South Wales
flag msg tools
...to explore and discover games of all shapes and sizes regardless of colour, condition or creed
mbmbmbmbmb
jouslare wrote:
Wow, Neil you have outdone even yourself with this review! I thought about reviewing Hive a while ago and thought, no, I have nothing new to offer... You do! Thanks.

I have been playing Hive since exactly June 2008 and have logged 80+ games -- I'll play it anywhere with anyone. One thing I have noticed, though, is that draws seem to become more and more common with experience. I have a couple tough opponents where a draw is about all either of us can expect after a good struggle. (not unlike Liverpool's season so far this year, but I won't say that with my "outside voice". Ooops, did I?)


Thanks Drew and Jouslare for the kind words. I always question which game I should review next and it makes it even harder when a game like Hive already has 4 odd pages of reviews.

I'm glad that I managed to say something different and worthwhile.

Liverpool is kind of like the War...we don't mention it.

EDIT - Draws eh? Yeah I guess Hive still has that 'skill level' problem when lots of experience (50+ plays) is present.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dan
United States
San Francisco
California
flag msg tools
I must think over my position and how I may improve it.
mb
You can play here against a computer, but it's a pretty good feel of how to play. The computer beat me every time until I started mimicking its play and came up with some strategies of my own. Only complaint is sometimes if you play too well it will get paralyzed and make redundant and stupid moves.

After a lot of plays, I lost interest and took it off my WTB list.

It didn't feel like a lifetime to master type of game. I plan to get Ingenious and some other abstracts before I pick this up. The cost is too prohibitive!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
I am on a Journey...
Australia
Lavington
New South Wales
flag msg tools
...to explore and discover games of all shapes and sizes regardless of colour, condition or creed
mbmbmbmbmb
oeolycus wrote:
You can play here against a computer, but it's a pretty good feel of how to play. The computer beat me every time until I started mimicking its play and came up with some strategies of my own. Only complaint is sometimes if you play too well it will get paralyzed and make redundant and stupid moves.

After a lot of plays, I lost interest and took it off my WTB list.

It didn't feel like a lifetime to master type of game. I plan to get Ingenious and some other abstracts before I pick this up. The cost is too prohibitive!


Ingenius has a lot of fans around these parts but in my opinion it ain't no Hive - I traded Ingenius away.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pete
Australia
Hobart
Tasmania
flag msg tools
My old friend "Burger", RIP 2005
mbmbmbmbmb
Great review Neil.

For those who game with their partners, don't get this game if your wife/partner has a pathological fear of spiders. I'm yet to get this one on the table after our first (and probably last) game.

Pete
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
JessA
United States
Southwestern
Michigan
flag msg tools
A Gren Fox in lieu of Miss Turtle Artist's fox
mbmbmbmbmb
Superlative review, Neil!

I want to chime in that you shouldn't necessarily write this game off if you don't like abstracts.

I avoided this game because I thought it might be too abstract, but my secret santa bought it for me last year and it is now among my favorite games.

It isn't dry and brain burning which turns me off some abstracts.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Björn Steffen
Switzerland
Zürich
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Thank you very much for this wonderful review!

I enjoyed reading your review even though I own Hive for more than a year now. I liked the very detailed and well written description of all the things which make Hive such a brilliant game.

I especially like that Hive can be played almost anywhere, what you have pointed out beautifully with the picture of Hive at the beach. I had some nice game sessions at irregular places too: Several times in the train and on a big stone at a river.

Cheers


2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pasta Batman
United States
Tustin
California
flag msg tools
mbmb
steffenb wrote:
I especially like that Hive can be played almost anywhere, what you have pointed out beautifully with the picture of Hive at the beach. I had some nice game sessions at irregular places too: Several times in the train and on a big stone at a river.

Yep, this is my 'throw-it-in-the-backpack' game. Playing a game in a pleasant natural setting is a memorable experience, and Hive is particularly well-suited for it.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
I am on a Journey...
Australia
Lavington
New South Wales
flag msg tools
...to explore and discover games of all shapes and sizes regardless of colour, condition or creed
mbmbmbmbmb
Jatoha wrote:
It isn't dry and brain burning which turns me off some abstracts.


Very well said - I should have written that. blush
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Yours Truly,
United States
Raleigh
North Carolina
flag msg tools
There must have been a moment at the beginning, where we could have said no. Somehow we missed it. Well, we'll know better next time.
mbmbmbmbmb
oeolycus wrote:
You can play here against a computer, but it's a pretty good feel of how to play. The computer beat me every time until I started mimicking its play and came up with some strategies of my own. Only complaint is sometimes if you play too well it will get paralyzed and make redundant and stupid moves.

After a lot of plays, I lost interest and took it off my WTB list.

It didn't feel like a lifetime to master type of game.


But is that a function of the game or the AI?!
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Pasta Batman
United States
Tustin
California
flag msg tools
mbmb
JohnnyDollar wrote:
oeolycus wrote:
You can play here against a computer, but it's a pretty good feel of how to play. The computer beat me every time until I started mimicking its play and came up with some strategies of my own. Only complaint is sometimes if you play too well it will get paralyzed and make redundant and stupid moves.

After a lot of plays, I lost interest and took it off my WTB list.

It didn't feel like a lifetime to master type of game.


But is that a function of the game or the AI?!

And it's known to be a fairly weak AI at that. The dumbbot at boardspace.net is probably better. Or try playing a top human opponent there. But I warn people to avoid spending too much time there if you are planning on buying the game - you're completely missing the tactile and social experience, and risk quicky making yourself too experienced for friends & family. Save your online endeavors for heavier abstracts.
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Josh Wilkinson
United States
Atlanta
Georgia
flag msg tools
mb
I showed this game on BGG to my girlfriend last night because I've been particularly interested in it. She said she would flat-out not play the game because she didn't like the idea of manipulating (or even looking at) the spider-pieces.

A consideration, I suppose, is that the theme could be a turn-off...
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
tom moughan
United States
Rochester
New York
flag msg tools
ahh....I love the smell of a stack of sketchily placed animals in the morning!
mbmbmbmbmb
my wife has disdain for insects, especially spiders, and LOVES THIS GAME. Buy it. She will thank you later. ; D
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2  Next »   | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.