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Magic: The Gathering» Forums » Rules

Subject: Attacking and blocking rss

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I'm still a little confused on how attacking and blocking works when both players have multiple monsters involved. How exactly is the damage/blocking distributed?
 
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Josh P.
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Long time since I've played, but I don't think this stuff has changed much.

Blocker assigns which blocker blocks which attacker. Multiple blockers may block one creature, but then the attacker assigns the damage any way he sees fit (unless your blockers have Banding). Blocking stops all damage unless the creatures have Trample. Trample damage continues past the creature and the leftover hits the player. Unblocked creatures also hit the player. Creatures may be pumped larger using a variety of ways after blocking has been declared, but before damage is dealt.

Hope that helps.
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Matt Olson
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Go here:
http://www.wizards.com/Magic/TCG/Resources.aspx?x=magic/rule...

Download basic rulebook, see page 11.

Additional to this, two or more creatures can block one attacker; however the attacker decides how his combat damage is distributed amongst the blockers.

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Mike West
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As other posters mention, the easiest way to remember how damage is distributed is this:

Each player always works out where the damage is dealt to their OPPONENT'S creatures, unless one of that opponent's creatures has Banding when the opponent chooses where the damage goes on their own creatures.

Therefore the 4 possible examples:

1. Player 1 attacks without banding (therefore only 1 creature attacks alone) Player 2 defends with 2 creatures that don't have banding.

Player 1 decides where the damage goes on Player 2's creatures. All Player 2's damage goes onto Player 1's creature.

2. Player 1 attacks without banding (therefore only 1 creature attacks alone) Player 2 defends with 2 creatures of which at least 1 has banding..

Player 2 decides where the damage goes on Player 2's creatures. All Player 2's damage goes onto Player 1's creature.

3. Player 1 attacks with banding creatures (All apart from 1 creature must have banding when attacking together) Player 2 defends with 2 creatures that don't have banding..

Player 1 decides where the damage goes on Player 1's creatures. Player 1 also decides where all the damage goes on Player 2's creatures.

4. Player 1 attacks with banding creatures (All apart from 1 creature must have banding when attacking together) Player 2 defends with 2 creatures of which at least 1 has banding..

Player 1 decides where the damage goes on Player 1's creatures. Player 2 decides where all the damage goes on Player 2's creatures.

Hope that clears it up?


 
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Jennifer Schlickbernd
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Note that banding has been out of the game for over a decade.
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Jeff Wiles
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jschlickbernd wrote:
Note that banding has been out of the game for over a decade.


And good riddance.
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Brien Martin
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It's easy to get confused, but here's the basic thing you have to remember ... the creatures your opponent has out to attack are all out to get *you*.

What you have to do is maximize the damage you can do to those creatures by blocking with one or more of your own. You always have the option to let the attack come through without blocking, but it's not an "all-or-nothing" proposition. In other words, you could use two of your creatures to block one of his two creatures, and let the other one come through and hit you for damage.

Let's assume your opponent is attacking you with a 2/2 and a 1/1 ... and that you have a 1/1 and 1/1 to defend.

Soon as he announces his attacks, you can decide, right there, to let him hit you for three damage and save your creatures for the counter-attack on your turn.

However, if you choose to defend, you have to be careful. If you block in a one-on-one situation, here's what will happen:

His 2/2 will kill your 1/1
His 1/1 will kill the other 1/1, and your 1/1 will kill him back

Net result: no damage, but you lose two creatures.

You could block his 2/2 with both of your 1/1, which would kill all three creatures, but leave his 1/1 to hit you for one damage.

You could block his 1/1 with one of your 1/1, but leave his 2/2 to hit you for two damage by not blocking with your remaining 1/1.

Always remember that not every creature you have must block. Once he commits his creatures to the attack, he can't change his mind. You, because you get to wait and see what's coming, can decide to split up any blocks you do make to maximize the creatures you can eliminate.

You also have to be aware of what's in your hand that can come out on your next turn to replace anything you lose in blocking. There may be situations where you won't mind getting hit for 3-4 damage to preserve your creatures to deal a bigger shot on the return trip (especially if you can play a spell or enchantment that can give you some +/+ next time.

Will you make mistakes as you learn how to handle the multiple creatures in battle scenarios? Yes. As long as you learn from them (especially if you play more experienced players who may be able to give you some pointers after the game), then you'll become adept at handling whatever your opponent throws at you.

Brien
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