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Ender Wiggins
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Introducing Ice Flow

Let's start by helping you come up with some reasons to justify reading this review and explore this game. You're a board game geek, mind you, so really you don't need to justify doing any reading on this site! And deep down you just know that you can't tear yourself away from any game that looks good and sounds fun. But just in case your beloved girlfriend, wife, husband, co-worker, boss, third-cousin, or gerbil tries pulling you away from this review or asks you to justify why you're looking at Ice Flow, at least you'll have something to say.



Why should you get excited about Ice Flow?

Because it's good for families and a wide range of people! Yep, including that girlfriend, that co-worker, boss, or third-cousin! It's billed as follows: "Ice Flow is a strategic family game, interesting enough for gamers, as there are many tactical decisions to make." Quite frankly, that's bang on! Gamers seem to enjoy this as much as older children or non-gamers!



Why should you get excited about Ice Flow? Because it has cool components! Really, what other game can you think of that has polar bear meeples? Yes, polar bear meeples! And rope! And fish! And fantastic looking ice floes! Awesome! When Neil Armstrong was asked about the Ice Flow, he is reported to have said: "A small step for polar bears, a giant step for mankind." If it's good enough for an astronaut, then surely Ice Flow is good enough for you!



Because it has a great theme! The aim is to be the first player to get your three explorers across the Bering Strait from Alaska to Siberia by using rope and fish, jumping on moving ice floes and dodging polar bears. You'll find yourself getting into the theme, carefully throwing a fish in the direction of your opponents to distract a polar bear while you quickly dash to an important ice floe, and making polar bear jokes. Hasn't everyone wanted to be an adventurer at one time?



Because it's not your average euro game! We love euro games, of course, don't we! But after a while, it's nice to explore something different than a game that involves using resources and money to collect victory points. The good news is that Ice Flow isn't about victory points! There's lots of ice floes, fish, and polar bears, but no victory points. No wood or brick to collect. No families to feed. It's a kind of race: who can be the first to navigate their three explorers to the other side of the Bering Strait? And yet it has important tactical decisions about using fish and rope that eurogamers will appreciate and enjoy.



Because it's a fun game and a good one. I'm not the only one to think that. Hey, Ice Flow won "Best New Board Game" at the UK Games Expo 2008. If it's good enough for the judges, then surely it's good enough for you to check out to see if it's for you. And if that's not enough to convince your co-worker or third cousin who is hassling you about what you are doing reading this review, then tell them that Ender says this game reminds him of Frogger. If that doesn't do it, nothing will!

So are you a teensy bit excited about Ice Flow yet? Ready to keep on reading? Put on your mittens and your winter coat, we're heading to Alaska, and let's get to our adventure!



Components

The box-cover immediately introduces us to the flavour of the game - a brave explorer, scampering across the ice, with a ruck sack and a rope, trying to get out of reach of a hostile polar bear.



The back of the box tells us more:



But of course we want to see the cool stuff inside! So we whip off the box lid, pull out the game board and rule sheet, and here's our first glimpse of the lovely components:



So what do we all get inside the game? Here's a complete list:



Let's check out the components a little more closely!

Components: Rule Book

The game comes with three rule books, in English, French, and German:



Here's the cover of the English rule book:



Altogether there are only four pages of rules to absorb, and there's lots of helpful pictures, references, and illustrative examples that go along with the text. Do be aware that there have been some minor changes to the rules since the game was first published. The original rules are available here on BGG, but the game designers have since released revised rules (ver. 1.03 September 24, 2008) on their website. Most of the changes are cosmetic, and clarifying the language, but one more significant change is that during the game setup, the ice floes are to be placed before the explorers, instead of the reverse order. To learn the game, you can also check out two videos explaining the basics of the game here and here.

Components: Board

The game board is essentially a map of the Bering Strait, with Alaska on the right hand side and Siberia on the left hand side, and the small Diomede Islands in the center:



The aim of the game is to get your three explorers from the stations in Alaska to the stations in Siberia before the other players get their three explorers across the Strait.



The artwork is really quite charming - check out the close-up detail of a starting station in Alaska, and notice that by the time your explorers reach a station in Siberia, their toes are cold and they need to be warmed up with a hot water bottle and a hot bath!



The theme is of special interest here - I discovered that the game board corresponds quite closely to a satellite image of the real Bering Strait:



I couldn't find all the places listed on the map, but certainly some of the stations, like Wales in Alaska (with a population of about 150), are very real:



If you head to Google, you'll see that Wales even has a runway! The settlements on the Diomede Islands are equally real - albeit far more remote, since this is an eskimo community that relies almost entirely on subsistence.



But I'm digressing: I know that you are itching to see the polar bears!

Components: Ice Floe tiles and Cloth bag

There are 24 Ice Floe tiles in the game:



If you look carefully, you'll notice that they have straight edges and rough edges. The rough edges are "pack ice", and your explorers will need some rope to negotiate these! There are six different types of Ice Floe tiles with different arrangements of where the pack ice is:



There's also a nice black cloth bag for storing the ice floe tiles, in order to select them randomly:



Components: Explorers

The Explorers come in four different colours, a different colour for each player (the game supports 2-4 players):



Each player gets three Explorers of their colour:



Components: Rucksack cards

Each player gets a "Rucksack card" which is used to carry a maximum of three items. There are four of these, one for each player, corresponding to the colour of their Explorers:



Components: Rope and Fish

So what are you going to carry in your rucksack? To help them on their quest, your Explorers will need some rope and some fish.

There are 15 red rope pieces:



Rope is used to get over the pack ice. It's also used to catch fish.

Speaking of which, there are also 15 fish:



Fish is used for energy to swim, and to distract polar bears. You can carry up to a maximum of three fish and/or rope in your rucksack.

Components: Polar bears

Now for the part you've been waiting for: the polar bears! There are five of these:



They may look cute, but don't be mistaken! Polar bears love eating fish. But if they're hungry they'll also chase explorers! Don't say you weren't warned! One of my favorite lines in the rules is this one: "Please remember: polar bears are not pets, they are very dangerous wild animals. As with all arctic expeditions: walk softly and carry a big fish."



Components: Ice Flow cards

There's also 16 cards:



These get used to indicate what goes on an ice floe when it is taken out of the bag:



So depending on what card is turned up, an ice floe may end up with fish, rope, or even a polar bear on it, or a combination of all three.

Two of the cards mean that a fish and a rope is placed on the Diomede Islands instead of on the ice floe:



Components: Reference cards

Finally, there are four reference cards, one for each player:



The side of each card pictured above explains what you can do in a turn (ice floe action + explorer action). The other side of the card (pictured below) explains what you can use each item for (rope: move over pack ice, or go fishing; fish: swim, or distract a polar bear).



Game-play: Set-up

Preparation



Each player gets a rucksack with a rope and a fish, a reference card, and three explorers:



The ice floe tiles are shuffled in the bag and the ice floe cards are placed face down on the board.

Starting player

Now for some more fun - determining the starting player: "The player who proves best able - by general consent - to do a polar bear impression becomes the Starting Player." Don't laugh! Don't scoff! You know that you really want to try this! Come on, loosen up, put your social graces aside for a moment and give this a shot - it will help "break the ice", get everyone in the right mood, and lighten up! But if you do wimp out, you can always "use your group's favoured method" to select a starting player instead.

Place initial ice floes

In turns, each player takes an ice floe tile out the bag, flips an Ice Flow card to see what gets placed on it, and places it on the board until 12 initial ice floe tiles have been placed. They cannot be placed alongside each other, or on the 8 entry points marked at the start of each sea current.

Place explorers

In turns, players put one explorer on each of the 6 Alaskan stations, with a maximum of 2 explorers per station.

Here's what the start of a three player game looked like after the set-up:



Game-play: Flow of play

Each player takes turns, with a turn consisting of an ice floe action and an explorer action. The order of these actions does not matter, but you must do one of each, and then it is the next person's turn.



Play continues until someone gets all three of their explorers in Siberia - but they must be in different stations.

Game-play: Ice Floe action

As the reference card indicates, you can choose from one of three possible ice floe actions:

1. Chart an ice floe movement: move an ice floe according to the sea current it is floating it, the equivalent distance indicated by the number of arrows in the current. So a current with 3 arrows south means you move the ice floe south three hexes, if possible. You can move any ice floe, unless it is an ice floe containing other player's explorers and none of your own.

2. Measure ice floe rotation: rotate any ice flow 60 degrees in any direction. You can rotate any ice floe, unless it is an ice floe containing other player's explorers and none of your own.

3. Discover a new ice floe: flip an Ice Flow card to see what items go on the ice floe, then take an ice floe tile from the bag and place it on one of the eight entry points for the current, along with the new items.

Here's an illustration of each of the three times of ice floe actions:



Game-play: Explorer action

As the reference card indicates, you can choose from one of two possible explorer actions:

1. Move explorer and collect an item: You can move one explorer as far as you like and/or can, and at the end of your movement collect one item that is on the space where your explorer stops. Movement across ice floes with flat edges is free, but you need a rope to leave or enter an ice floe with pack ice (you leave the rope behind on the tile you left). You can also swim across one stretch of open water by eating a fish (which is discarded). Only two explorers can be on a single ice floe (although a third explorer can pass through such a space without stopping). You can't go onto an ice floe with a polar bear unless you have a fish to distract it!

2. Go fishing: You can hang a rope over the edge of an ice floe and "go fishing", i.e. exchange a rope with 2 fish from the supply.



Game-play: Using items

Now you know the basics of game-play but the reference card also summarizes this by looking at the above information from a different angle - the different uses for rope and fish.



Uses for rope

i. Cross 1 pack ice ridge: you need a rope to cross a ridge with pack ice. This also applies if you are entering or leaving an ice floe to go swimming. The rope remains on the ice floe you started from (if you are swimming and enter an ice floe with pack ice, the rope is discarded).

ii. Go fishing: instead of moving and collecting an item, you can go fishing, and exchange a rope from your backpack for two fish from the supply.



Uses for fish

i. Swim 1 sea space: You can eat one fish to swim across one stretch of open water. Note that you'll need rope to enter or leave an ice floe with pack ice! You can do more than one stretch of swimming in a turn, as long as they aren't consecutive.

Here's an illustration of movement using fish:



ii. Distract 1 polar bear: You cannot go onto an ice floe with a polar bear at any time unless you have a fish to distract it. If you do, you have one of two options:

a) move to another ice floe (using your fish to distract the polar bear to stay there)


b) stop on this ice floe (using your fish to distract the polar bear to move elsewhere)
You can make the polar bear swim in any of six directions, and it will keep swimming until it goes off the board or lands on another ice floe (polar bears cannot be made to swim to Alaska or Siberia) - possibly requiring another player to deal with it immediately if the polar bear lands on an ice floe with one of their explorers!



Make no mistake, the Arctic food chain is perilous!



The true story behind the theme

When doing some research about the game, I couldn't help but notice that some reviewers were a little critical about the theme. For example, some point out that if explorers are airlifted back to Alaska when unable to escape polar bears, why not take the helicopter all the way to Siberia in the first place? Others jokingly sneer at the notion that explorers would even be sent out on this odd mission: "Why am I sending these poor schmoes to Siberia? Did they cheat on my wife? Steal money from my retirement fund? What did they do to deserve this sorry fate? My heart goes out to them, those sorry doomed explorers of the frozen North, but I’ll send them to an icy death if that’s what I need to do to win. May history understand and forgive me… "

These questions are meant to be amusing, but to genuine cynics I politely say: do your research! The theme of Ice Flow was inspired by Karl Bushby's very real Goliath Expedition, as the designers explain here: http://www.ludorum.co.uk/ICEFLOW/inspiration.htm



In November 1998, Karl Bushby commenced a record breaking attempt to walk around the world, which he hopes to complete in 2012. Part of his journey? Walking over the Bering Straits into Russia. The timing has to be just right, because the Bering Strait isn't frozen year round. Together with French adventurer Dimitri Kieffer, Bushby crossed the Bering Strait on foot in March 2006, taking 15 days to walk across a frozen 56 mile section. And yes, they did have to swim part of the way! Ironically, they were initially detained by Russian officials while crossing the Russian border near the village of Uelen, for entering Russia illegally. Bushby published a book (called Giant Steps: The Remarkable Story of the Goliath Expedition - From Punta Arenas to Russia) recounting this part of his journey, and extracts from his diary describing the crossing can also be found here, along with photos. He was also featured on the BBC programme Inside Out (videos can be viewed here). Crossing pack ice really does require a rope!



A BBC news article reporting this stage of his trip included the following: "An ex-paratrooper has become the first Briton to walk across the Bering Strait, the treacherous 58-mile frozen sea between North America and Russia. Karl Bushby reached land after 14 days walking across shifting plates of ice in temperatures reaching -30C. The explorer, from Hull, is 18,000 miles into an epic 36,000-mile round-the-world trip. The 37-year-old began his mission in Chile in 1998 and is hoping to return to England by 2010. The trip will take him across four continents, 25 countries, six deserts and seven mountain ranges. ... The pair had to take a roundabout 150-mile route to cross the 58-mile wide strait from Alaska to Siberia, crossing sheets of ice which were drifting with the current."



So no more jokes about "if the game lets you get airlifted by a helicopter from an ice-floe, then why not take the helicopter directly to Siberia?" This is a serious accomplishment of endurance, and in Ice Flow, you get the chance to walk in Karl Bushby's footsteps!

What do I think?

Somehow Ice Flow reminds me a little of chinese checkers, in that you're trying to get your explorers from one side to the other, and trying to set things up to maximize your movement on one turn. It reminds me even more of the old arcade game Frogger, where the aim was to move frogs across a busy road by avoiding cars, and across a river by hopping from one log to the next. The comparison is certainly there, but Ice Flow somehow turns similar ideas into a great tactical board game, and adds a good dose of theme and chrome.

There's a lot that I like about Ice Flow:
● easy and intuitive rules
● satisfying for both families and gamers
● strong tactical element
● great looking and novel components
● terrific and fun theme
● high fun factor
● decent play time

If there is a down-side, it might be that it can start feeling slightly long for a four player game (60 minutes), but 2-3 player games are shorter and feel just right. I especially like the fact that I'm not doing the same thing as in most euro games - collecting victory points. I like games with victory points, mind you, but it's nice to have something that offers a change of pace and style. Those who do dislike Ice Flow, suggest it's too puzzle-like, abstract, and has too much potential for analysis paralysis. These weren't issues for me, mind you, and although I recognize that not everyone might appreciate the fact that this is more of puzzle style of game, I'd suggest that some reviewers have overstated this.



James Marriot sums it up nicely as follows: "This is not fully a traditional 'Euro-style' game; nor does it necessarily aim to be, but do not dismiss this merely as a family game either. With a board comprising a hexagon field of 70 or so spaces covered by 30 moving ice floe pieces of varying designs (in a very nice translucent ice-blue plastic), the Ice Flow board offers millions of configurations, creating the choices and dilemmas which make Euro-games so compelling. Added to this is a pleasingly logical rule set, objects with multiple uses, a good deal of player interaction, and a simple move-explorer / move-ice dynamic that keeps the game driving forwards."



Thumbs up to designers Dean Conrad (pictured above at Essen) and John Streets for a great game! Dean Conrad also actively supports the game with helpful and quick responses to questions about the game here on BGG.

What do others think?

But don't just take my word for it. Most people really enjoy this a lot - here's what a few other fans of Ice Flow have to say about it:

"Another terrific family game with cute pieces and lovely production values (the ice floes are a work of art.) ... this is the sort of game that should be an SdJ contender." - David Brain
"Wow, this IS a cool looking game! Love those blue-see-thru ice hexes. The bears (beaples?) are great too. In fact: the whole game looks very good. It's a very clear design that might make you think it's a simple kids game. Don't be fooled: this is a good strategical game that might be the right "next step up" after lighter fare as Ticket to ride for newbies." - Mike B
"A very very good game. A transitional-type family game that will be played by both gamers as a light trek-across-the-ice and by families as a regular exploration. Very attractive pieces especially the floes themselves." - Alan Paull
"Surprisingly quick, light-medium weight strategy game. Low luck factor and plenty of screw your neighbour style gameplay tactics make for a clever race game." - Rob Robinson
"It has great potential as either a deep strategy game or as a lighter family game. This provides a game that can be played at many different levels and with many different people." - Bradley Keen
"A great looking game with fantastic bits that's an absolute blast to play. A very fun and well done game that I will play anytime." - Bill Paradise
"A dozen plays and counting pushes this to [rating of] 10. A fantastic gateway game. And the best game production for 2008 so far." - Michael Saunders




The final word

Is Ice Flow for you? That will depend on your taste and what you look for in a game, but there's no doubt that this is the kind of game that has a very broad appeal. In fact, I think that this is the kind of game that is Spiele des Jahres material: wonderful components, strong theme, easy to learn and play, suitable for families, and yet satisfying also as a lighter game for gamers. Really, it deserves to be on the same shelf as more well-known and successful games like Zooloretto. Will it hold up to long-time replayability? That remains to be seen, but for now, I think that as a family game with depth, Ice Flow is a top shelf game!



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The complete list of Ender's pictorial reviews: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/37596
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Tony Kelly
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My compliments for a fantastic review. Thanks

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John Owen
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I'm really happy that I picked this one up. It's great for all of the reasons that you mention above!

One more reason, though, is because my one (semi-gamer when he's around them) brother-in-law fell in love with the game. He's liked other games, but he LOVED this one.
 
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Andrew Saunders
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Great review on what is an underrated game.
 
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W. Eric Martin
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The "poor schmoes" paragraph comes from my Ice Flow preview, which ran on BoardgameNews.com in May 2008. Far from mocking the theme, I was expressing sympathy for the future suffering of the tiny wood explorers as their pores would be suffused with water, water that would subsequently freeze, expand, and crack apart their delicate fibers. My heart goes out to their survivors...

Eric
Editor, http://www.BoardgameNews.com
Get game news via Twitter – http://twitter.com/BoardgameNews
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montag 66
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Another game added to my Want List due to your great review.

I thank you while my wife curses you.
 
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Wade Broadhead
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Seriously, how can you have 3 kids and have time to play all these games enough to review them, and then write all these reviews, unless it was you job?? This is crazy, and I'm happy to benefit from the craziness.

Oh and my wife and her occasional gaming friend loved this one so that alone makes it worth its weight.
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John Owen
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Wade, I agree. Ender is beginning to approach Tom Vasel style supernatural status as far as productivity in boardgame reviewing goes, while simultaneously caring for his kids and getting other things done.
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Dean Conrad
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Henry Rhombus wrote:
The "poor schmoes" paragraph comes from my Ice Flow preview, which ran on BoardgameNews.com in May 2008. Far from mocking the theme, I was expressing sympathy for the future suffering of the tiny wood explorers as their pores would be suffused with water, water that would subsequently freeze, expand, and crack apart their delicate fibers. My heart goes out to their survivors...

Eric


We heard that Eric has a 'thing' about polar bears; that water thing may just be a ruse. However, that may just be a rumour.

D.
 
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Jens Hoppe
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It's not the years, honey, it's the mileage.
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As always a wonderful and unbelievably thorough review. I especially liked the satellite photos and the "story behind the theme" bits.

If I could change one thing in your reviews, I would probably prefer for you to include a more balanced sample of user comments. Not everybody loves the game, after all, and a lot of the more "meh" 6 and 7 rating comments illustrate nicely what some of the game's weaknesses might be.

Personally, I was all set to love the game, but my first game left me cold. And not only me - while I was just moderately unimpressed with certain aspects of the game, some of the other players really disliked it.
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Brad Fuller
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Another great review, although this time you can't sell me, I already own it.
 
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James Bentley
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You definitely deserve some kind of award for presenting reviews of this depth and polish.

I don't suppose there would be one in the works for: Agricola, Mystery of the Abbey, Pirate's Cove, Dominion, Thebes, Jamaica?

Of course, I own none of the games just listed.



 
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Chris Ferejohn
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Pitying fools as hard as I can...
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Great review! Get ready for a nitpick...

Quote:
Ironically, they were initially detained by Russian officials while crossing the Russian border near the village of Uelen, for entering Russia illegally.


Nothing ironic here.
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Markus
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So this is my new overtext ? Hmmm...
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Wow, this review is awesome, thanks
 
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5UIIIIII3R \/4C4Ti0I\I 15 h3r3!
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Glacial review.
You should receive commission for each copy sold thanks to your spotlighting of Ice Flow!
 
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Craig Somerton
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Give a man fire and he's warm for the day. Set fire to him and he's warm for the rest of his life.
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Wow! What an unbelievably great review. I so want this game, but finding it in Australia is impossible.
 
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Dean Conrad
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ICE FLOW is available at the Ludorum Games shop here:
http://www.ludorum.co.uk/shop.htm

Free (surface) shipping anywhere in the world.

D.
 
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Mark crane
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jens_hoppe wrote:
As always a wonderful and unbelievably thorough review. I especially liked the satellite photos and the "story behind the theme" bits. :)

If I could change one thing in your reviews, I would probably prefer for you to include a more balanced sample of user comments. Not everybody loves the game, after all, and a lot of the more "meh" 6 and 7 rating comments illustrate nicely what some of the game's weaknesses might be.

Personally, I was all set to love the game, but my first game left me cold. And not only me - while I was just moderately unimpressed with certain aspects of the game, some of the other players really disliked it.


Yeah, I have heard some pretty consistent complaints about the length and some other aspects, and it would be useful to see those addressed more fully, because I really want to like this game.
 
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Harvey O'Brien
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Dagnamit, Ender, the only thing wrong with your reviews is the desire they inevitably evoke in me to immediately go out and buy the games in question! Grrrr.

Another thorough review with terrific illustration (this is the bit that really gets my motor going - oooohhh, shiny!)
 
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SC Shin
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Simply the best review i have ever seen!!!!1
 
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SC Shin
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Hex_Enduction_Hour wrote:
Glacial review.
You should receive commission for each copy sold thanks to your spotlighting of Ice Flow!


Right on!!
 
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Daniël Muilwijk
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Just 'Wow' for this review!
 
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Vinicius Yuiti Takaki
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Hey, you got really in the mood for this one.
Very enthusiastic review, and also, GREAT photos!

How about sending some to National Geograpic?

Great job!!
 
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BT Carpenter
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So... the people in Alaska really can see Russia from their house?
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Andy Andersen
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Another fantastic review. I'll be picking this one up based on your opinion, Ender.
 
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