$10.00
Recommend
33 
 Thumb up
 Hide
16 Posts

Tigris & Euphrates» Forums » Strategy

Subject: Tigris & Euphrates: General Strategy Guide rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: Strategy [+] [View All]
Bech D
msg tools
mb
Tigris & Euphrates: General Strategy Guide


I decided to start a thread on T&E Strategy because there just aren’t that many Strategy guides for T&E – or at least not many compared to other games.
Now I would like this to be an “open book” for anyone who likes T&E. I would like to see here many strategies and thoughts about T&E. Maybe after everyone has had something to say we can draw a line and make a General Strategy Guide for beginners and advanced players.
What you will read about here:
1. Bluffing
2. Starting Moves
3. 10 Things Not to Do in a T&E Game


1. Bluffingdevil
I start with this because I didn’t see this strategy anywhere and we use it all the time. While some might find it ‘un-honorable’ it’s a game about war... so anything goes...
What’s bluffing about? As the name says after you replenish your tiles you bluff:
“Damn! I only have blue tiles!”whistle
or
“Damn! I don’t have any red tiles!”whistle
This might determine some players to attack you and have a big surprise when you reach behind you board and take out red tiles when he thought you had none.devil

2. Starting Moves



Starting Position.

NEVER place a leader in front of you just because “it’s in front of you”.

Always try to place your first leader in a position where you can easily reach two treasures. That is generally a nice way to start: plan for your first and SECOND treasure.

There are two “Powerful” starting positions in the game (provided that you have at least a blue tile). These are Zone A and Zone B. These are the so-called Protected Zones. Why? Because one has to have a blue tile in order to reach you (of course you have to have one to get out) AND because you can easily block the red tiles (so no one can start an internal war). Zone B is better because you control the only place on the board where a monument can be built using blue tiles (Standard Edition).

And finally: ALWAYS start with the Black Leader. Some may disagree but in the beginning of the game you can’t formulate a strategy for the entire game – so the Black Leader is the best choice.


3. 10 Things Not to Do in a T&E Game

a. Never think that a kingdom is YOUR kingdom. The game doesn’t work that way. You only have leaders that ‘use’ the kingdoms as long as it’s profitable.

b. Never leave a treasure exposed (two spaces away from the kingdom with your leaders but not having the green leader there). This way anyone can simply place his/hers green leader as the first move and another tile to unite the kingdoms as the second move, thus claiming the treasure. The simple way to avoid this is to always have three spaces between the kingdom and the treasure if your green leader is not around.

c. Never forget the winning mechanism: your weakest color is the one that counts. Many new players just concentrate to win as many points and at the end you get something like: Green 15, Red: 14, Black: 8, Blue: 2.
This rule is difficult to follow even for advanced players. I always find myself in the position to create an external conflict on a color that I don’t need. In this case you have to see if taking away that color from your opponent is worth something. If not you should have the strength to let it go and consolidate your other colors – though it is often difficult as a battle is always fun.

d. Never end a game without using you calamities. These are often simply forgotten and it’s a pity as they are very powerful weapons.

e. NEVER start a war between other players without participating. You just hand out points to at least one of them.

f. Never leave any one player use a monument for too long. REMEBER: ‘Late Monuments’ are more important than ‘Early Monuments’.
An ‘Early Monument’ is a monument constructed early in the game. You can leave a player use it longer while you build up you forces because early in the game that player doesn’t have many colors. That means he chose two random colors and you can still block him from getting the other two he needs.
‘Late Monuments’ are on the other hand VERY dangerous. Built late in the game, a ‘Late Monuments’ will provide the player with EXACTLY the colors he needs. A ‘Late Monuments’ should be attacked in the first or at least second round since its construction. A later attack can even cause loosing the game as that player can gain +2 for each of its weak colors (if he also places tile of the same color) in the first round and +3 in the second.

g. Never create ‘Gift Kingdoms’. What have we come to name a ‘Gift Kingdom’? It’s a kingdom created late in the game when you lack a certain color and you don’t have that leader in the game. So you just place that leader near a free starting temple/treasure tile. WRONG. If it’s not away from other, more developed kingdoms, you’ll just give away free points.

h. Never let vengeance cloud your mind. I’ve seen lots of games lost because someone wanted to get back at someone who had removed one of his leaders or had used a catastrophe on his kingdom. Keep focused! The best vengeance is beating that guy in the end!

i. Never leave the red tiles exposed. Always try to block them so if someone tries to start an internal war at least he will have to place a red tile thus giving you a red point.

j. Never leave your opponents ‘unattended’ for too long. This is no solitaire game. Placing two tiles and just gaining the colors you need is a bad move. Getting the colors you need AND messing up someone is always better and funnier!


That’s it for now. I will write next time about 10 Things You Should Do in a T&E Game.
Waiting for your opinions and other strategies for now...

43 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adrian Brooks
United Kingdom
Rugby
Warwickshire
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
BechD wrote:

e. NEVER start a war between other players without participating. You just hand out points to at least one of them.

I don't agree with you on this. The conditions where it's worth doing aren't necessarily common, but it's great when they are.

First, "Let's you and him fight" annoys them both.

Second, as you said yourself, "I always find myself in the position to create an external conflict on a color that I don’t need". There's no harm in handing points to another player if you know he's already strong in that colour, while (say) forcing the third player's leader off the board and denying him access to a monument.

Third, and the most important thing, is that *you* decide the order in which *they* resolve their conflicts. You may be able to force them through an ill-ordered clash which neither would choose, reducing a pair of mighty kingdoms into a scattering of puny areas ripe for your plunder.
33 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Todd Redden
United States
Manchester
Connecticut
flag msg tools
Nut'n honey
badge
If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything - Mark Twain
mbmbmbmbmb
I think one of the most important is "never end a game without using all of your calamities." Blocking another player, at just the right moment, from bringing on an external conflict, or that would win him a treasure is a most powerful tactic, one I've used to claim victory on at least a few occasions.

As for bluffing, none of my gamer friends believe anything anybody says anyway, so that would have no impact whatsoever (and, that's the way it should be.) Bluffing is meaningless. gulp
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Clark
United Kingdom
Bucks
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
tmredden wrote:
I think one of the most important is "never end a game without using all of your calamities." Blocking another player, at just the right moment, from bringing on an external conflict, or that would win him a treasure is a most powerful tactic, one I've used to claim victory on at least a few occasions.

Actually, I think that it's a good thing if you don't use your disaster tiles. They're not worth any points, after all. They can certainly be very powerful for splitting kingdoms (either now or in anticipation of an external conflict), bouncing leaders, stopping monuments, defending your position and so on but if you can do these things without using your disaster tiles then you'll usually be better off. They're more of a last resort.
14 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Todd Redden
United States
Manchester
Connecticut
flag msg tools
Nut'n honey
badge
If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything - Mark Twain
mbmbmbmbmb
Blue Uriah wrote:
tmredden wrote:
I think one of the most important is "never end a game without using all of your calamities." Blocking another player, at just the right moment, from bringing on an external conflict, or that would win him a treasure is a most powerful tactic, one I've used to claim victory on at least a few occasions.

Actually, I think that it's a good thing if you don't use your disaster tiles. They're not worth any points, after all. They can certainly be very powerful for splitting kingdoms (either now or in anticipation of an external conflict), bouncing leaders, stopping monuments, defending your position and so on but if you can do these things without using your disaster tiles then you'll usually be better off. They're more of a last resort.

Not sure. Don't forget you get 2 actions per turn, so you can still get points. And, sometimes a disaster tile is the only way to accomplish a very effective blockade. "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure." surprise
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jamie Pollock
Scotland
Edinburgh
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
There's quite a few aspects of this strategy guide that I don't agree with, particularly those parts where you've used 'always' and 'nevers' for rules of thumb! T&E isn't as black and white as that I'm afraid and that to me is one of its major strengths as a game.

For instance, while opening with your King is generally accepted as the norm, starting tiles and your position of play can dictate otherwise.

I also agree with Blue Uriah in that not having to use disasters is preferable since you're then scoring with both turns. Disasters should be used only if there is a significant and immediate advantage to be gained, such as a precursor to an external conflict, removing a critical leader from the board or protecting yourself from an impending external conflict. Remember, the disaster generally tends to affect only 1 of your opponents so while you're dutifully hampering them, the other players are actually gaining from the fact you didn't score from both of your turns. In 2-player it's a different story, and disasters more often than not should be used.

Starting positions. I believe it would be more commonly acknowledged that the strongest starting positions are around treasures C6, E14 and J6.

Starting fights with other players. This can occasionally be beneficial, particularly if a kingdom with one of your own leaders is also only one tile away. Smashing their kingdoms together first will typically exhaust their supporting tiles from their hands, thereby affording you an opportunity to feed off the scraps with near guaranteed odds of success.

Leaving red tiles exposed. Again, the use of never here is a mistake. In general this is good advice, however the tiles you have in your hand can make this impractical, and, if you have leaders protected with lots of temples, internal conflicts become extremely risky decisions for your opponents. Regardless, as the game progesses and you start collecting treasures, you are going to have exposed temples.

Leaving your opponents unattended for too long. Well that again depends on the game. If you're the player sitting with the monuments then avoiding your opponents is precisely what you want to do! If you're the one without the monuments then getting stuck in quickly is absolutely paramount. One of the most common mistakes I see inexperienced players making is allowing other players with monuments covering all colours to turtle in a corner for too long!

Overall though, I find 'strategy' a difficult term to associate with T&E. The status quo changes rapidly from round to round and trying to plan more than one round ahead is often a futile exercise (perhaps the only exception to this is when playing 2-player). My firm belief is T&E is first and foremost a tactical game, where the best decisions are made when it's your turn.

Regards

23 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Michael Clark
United Kingdom
Bucks
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Jambo wrote:
Leaving red tiles exposed. Again, the use of never here is a mistake. In general this is good advice, however the tiles you have in your hand can make this impractical, and, if you have leaders protected with lots of temples, internal conflicts become extremely risky decisions for your opponents. Regardless, as the game progesses and you start collecting treasures, you are going to have exposed temples.

Definitely true - it's usually not easy or efficient to box in all your temples. A better tip would be not to leave any spots adjacent to two or more temples. There's no good reason to do so, and it just gives would-be internal conflicters a free tile.

Quote:
Overall though, I find 'strategy' a difficult term to associate with T&E. The status quo changes rapidly from round to round and trying to plan more than one round ahead is often a futile exercise (perhaps the only exception to this is when playing 2-player). My firm belief is T&E is first and foremost a tactical game, where the best decisions are made when it's your turn.

I would certainly agree with this in the second half of the game when there are lots of tiles on the board and the landscape changes rapidly from turn to turn. But there are definitely strategic elements to the early game which could be critical in deciding the final outcome 13 turns later. Whether to put your leaders in the same kingdom or split them between more than one is a very important decision. Whether to build an early monument or not is another. One mistake I see beginners make a lot is not thinking about the shape of their kingdom. For example, a kingdom that looks like this:

##
##
###
K
P#


is a poorly structured kingdom. In an external conflict, they'll choose to resolve red first, your Priest will lose and then your King will be cut off from all those settlements and he'll lose too. Swap it around a bit, though, and you're in a far better position:

##
##
#
K##
#P


Now, should your Priest lose, your King is still very likely to win. Note that not only are you safe from an external conflict, you're safe from a disaster and an external conflict. There's no tile your opponent can nuke which will stop you from having four black to defend your King with.
29 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jamie Pollock
Scotland
Edinburgh
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Yep, excellent points Blue Uriah. The example you give on building sensible kingdoms is spot on.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Todd Redden
United States
Manchester
Connecticut
flag msg tools
Nut'n honey
badge
If you tell the truth, you don't have to remember anything - Mark Twain
mbmbmbmbmb
Jambo wrote:
There's quite a few aspects of this strategy guide that I don't agree with, particularly those parts where you've used 'always' and 'nevers' for rules of thumb! T&E isn't as black and white as that I'm afraid and that to me is one of its major strengths as a game.

Yes, I agree completely. In fact, my previous comment about using the catastrophe tiles was prompted by a memory of one game where I used one at just the right moment to prevent an opponent from getting a needed treasure, which helped yield a win for me. Yet, I can think of many games where such use would have been a wasted move. You have to be able to think on your toes in this game. Any action can have profound results, and the "butterfly effect" is rampant. In fact, sometimes simply staying out of harms way until just the right moment to POUNCE is the best strategy, but other times you have to go in with the guns blazing. So, I'm not sure general strategy is the thing.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bech D
msg tools
mb
Slow Dog wrote:
BechD wrote:

e. NEVER start a war between other players without participating. You just hand out points to at least one of them.

I don't agree with you on this. The conditions where it's worth doing aren't necessarily common, but it's great when they are.

First, "Let's you and him fight" annoys them both.

Second, as you said yourself, "I always find myself in the position to create an external conflict on a color that I don’t need". There's no harm in handing points to another player if you know he's already strong in that colour, while (say) forcing the third player's leader off the board and denying him access to a monument.

Third, and the most important thing, is that *you* decide the order in which *they* resolve their conflicts. You may be able to force them through an ill-ordered clash which neither would choose, reducing a pair of mighty kingdoms into a scattering of puny areas ripe for your plunder.


"First, "Let's you and him fight" annoys them both." - not both, only the looser. I'm sure the winner won't be annoyed at all!

"There's no harm in handing points to another player if you know he's already strong in that color" - that may be true for the end of the game but it doesn't work in the first half of the game. You might end up giving someone so many points in one color that he only need the other three for the rest of the game making it easier for him to win.

"You may be able to force them through an ill-ordered clash which neither would choose, reducing a pair of mighty kingdoms into a scattering of puny areas ripe for your plunder." - that is generally true and you get a great feeling from "reducing great kingdoms" - but "reducing" actually means lots of points for someone else.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bech D
msg tools
mb
tmredden wrote:
As for bluffing, none of my gamer friends believe anything anybody says anyway, so that would have no impact whatsoever (and, that's the way it should be.) Bluffing is meaningless. gulp


That depends as much on you as on your friends. The timing is important too: for example you see that in the next round someone might attack you on black. You can say "damn, only black tiles, I don't need those!" with no connection with conflict. That person may think twice before attacking.
It may work it may not... but I think it's worth a try.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bech D
msg tools
mb
Blue Uriah wrote:
Actually, I think that it's a good thing if you don't use your disaster tiles. They're not worth any points, after all. They can certainly be very powerful for splitting kingdoms (either now or in anticipation of an external conflict), bouncing leaders, stopping monuments, defending your position and so on but if you can do these things without using your disaster tiles then you'll usually be better off. They're more of a last resort.


You're right but you are talking about an ideal game (actually a boring game) where everyone is minding his own business. You usually get more points by attacking someone and you usually need to use your calamities. Better if you don't but you usually have to.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Bech D
msg tools
mb
Jambo wrote:
There's quite a few aspects of this strategy guide that I don't agree with, particularly those parts where you've used 'always' and 'nevers' for rules of thumb! T&E isn't as black and white as that I'm afraid and that to me is one of its major strengths as a game.


You're right. "Never" and "Always" should be "You Should" and "You Shouldn't".

 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Adrian Brooks
United Kingdom
Rugby
Warwickshire
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Ok. So, the simplified version:

BechD wrote:

e. NEVER start a war between other players without participating.


is too black and white. Doing just such a thing was the basis of one of my most satisfying victories.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Chris Handy
United States
Turlock
California
flag msg tools
designer
publisher
mbmbmbmbmb
Great thread.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
John Altena
Netherlands
Amstelveen / Amsterdam
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
BechD wrote:
e. NEVER start a war between other players without participating. You just hand out points to at least one of them.

Well, it might be a very nice idea to do just that; if your closest opponent is too strong to take the battle head on, then you can start the fight between 2 others with your 1st move, see how this ends up and then use the 2nd move to "pick up the leftovers", so to speak
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.