$10.00
Recommend
11 
 Thumb up
 Hide
3 Posts

Buy Low Sell High» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Four-Player Review of Buy Low Sell High rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Domenic
United States
San Jose
California
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Game Synopsis: Buy Low Sell High is an easy-to-learn stock trading game about buying and selling shares of stock. The player who earns the most money in three trading years wins.

Discussion:
It's hard to find games that are interesting to me, and easy enough to pick up that I can quickly teach them to non-gaming friends. This last weekend, Buy Low Sell High seemed to fit the niche.

It's easy to teach because people are familiar with the concept of buying and selling stocks and there are no more than 5 different kinds of cards to explain. Everything else in the game is just mechanical. (Move this counter over here, draw a card now, play an extra card because you just played the Fees card, etc.)

The trickiest/least-intuitive bit was trying to explain that you could trade two shares of one stock or one share of (up to) all three stocks, EXCEPT on the first two turns when you could only trade one share of stock or one share of (up to) two stocks respectively. In the future, I'm tempted to eliminate the special rules for the first two turns and just make sure the newest players take the first two spots.

An issue that exists regardless of the number of players is the constant math required. Since a score track is used to track each player's current cash on hand, every turn you have to do things like: "I have $51, and I'm buying a share of Tech for $12 and a share of Retail for $26, so I move my marker to $13." It's easy to mess up and be off by $10 -- which would completely change the game. So you have to have multiple people doing the math to double-check.

Finally, the use of same-shaped, differently-colored markers to track wealth threw us off in one game. People don't attach strongly enough to color, so sometimes the wrong token would be moved up or down to pay for stocks. The game after that, we got out the Monopoly pieces, which caused less confusion.

The game is a little bit different with four players. With fewer players, there are plenty of shares. With four, I encountered the "problem" of running out of shares of a particular stock due to excess demand for the first time! I'm not sure how to take that into account, but it certainly seems like locking in a position could somehow be used to your advantage.

Despite those caveats, I think Buy Low Sell High is a very approachable stock trading game.
1The rules are simple and (mostly) intuitive. The weird detail rules can be handled on a case-by-case basis as they arise.
2It plays quickly -- under an hour even with 4 players.
3Interaction is indirect, so there's less opportunity for people to feel hurt by other player's actions, but it definitely matters to you which cards other people will play or which stocks they buy, so this is not at all a solitaire game.

Conclusion: I won't bring this out when I have the time and players for something meatier, but this is a pretty solid game that can be played with non-gamers. It's always good to have a few of those around.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Laszlo Molnar
Hungary
Budapest
Hungary
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
Although the change might be hard after Monopoly, try to get used to same-shaped, different-coloured player pawns as most games have that...
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Domenic
United States
San Jose
California
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmbmb
lacxox wrote:
Although the change might be hard after Monopoly, try to get used to same-shaped, different-coloured player pawns as most games have that...


Yes, but I think it's a flaw when all of the pieces are on the board. In a game like Settlers of Catan, where you have a whole bunch of same-colored pieces in front of you, it's not too hard to identify with the orange pieces on the board. In this game, the only piece you have is your score counter, so it's easy to get lost.

Likewise, I've been working on my own prototype (hoping to pitch it early next year) where all of the player tokens are on the board. During playtesting, people frequently would start looking at the token nearest to them instead of the tokens of the right color. For my next-gen prototype, I'm using painted lead figures for tokens, so that each player can identify both with the figure and the color. That will probably be too expensive for mass production, but I think it will solve the confusion issue.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.