em m
Canada
Toronto
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What are the main differences between Kinder Bunnies and Killer Bunnies? I've played vanilla Killer Bunnies before and I'm thinking of getting Kinder Bunnies now for when my son gets old enough.
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Mercedes (Mandy)
Japan
Setagaya-ku
Tokyo
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Tokyo Game Market here I come!
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Sorry if I'm slow in reading mails. I'm currently working hard on some Alley Thieves
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I came to check out the same question...hehe but there's been no response.
 
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Simon Woodward
New Zealand
Hamilton
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I've got Kinder Bunnies, and I think it's rubbish, for what it's worth.
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Alex P
United States
Rockville
Maryland
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You've waited so long for an answer your son is probably in graduate school by now, but here goes. KinderBunnies is very much a stripped down version of the parent game, and in fact you can mix these cards into a Killer Bunnies game if you want.

The main difference is that in Kinder you don't use the mechanic of running the card you want to play through a two-card cycle, instead playing directly from your hand. The rules have several variations for players of various ages, and in some of them you play until the deck is exhausted and the player with the most carrots and bunnies is the winner, although in the most advanced version you use the same Magic Carrot mechanic as in Killer Bunnies.

There are no small cabbage and water cards to buy (money is used only to buy carrot cards, and the price never changes). Instead, there are large cabbage and water cards in the draw pile that you can use to feed your bunnies directly if you need to.

The other big change is there is not quite as much dice rolling. It comes with five d10 in the same colors as the original games's d12 (except no black). Kinder's version of weapons are Safety Hazards, which work a little differently. In the original game, a weapon has a level number that you have to beat on the black die to live. Safety Hazards also have a number. According to the Kinder rules, when a player plays a safety hazard, the owner of the target bunny rolls 5d10 and lives if he matches the number on at least one die. This means that while different safety hazards have different numbers, they're are equally dangerous.

That's about it. There are individual cards that work more or less in similar ways to the main game, but they're all pretty easy to understand.
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em m
Canada
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Thank you for the reply! Your response is timely as my son just turned 4 years old and is showing strong signs of being a gamer. I just started doing research again on suitable games that would be good for mom and dad as well. It sounds like Kinder Bunnies fits the bill. Thanks again. And Happy Easter!
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