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Subject: Games for teaching maths to 11 to 16-year-olds rss

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Scott Moore
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Birmingham
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Hi all,

I'm looking for games that can be used in a normal classroom environment (30 students) as an aid for teaching mathematics to 11 to 16-year-olds. Obviously given the limitations of school resourcing, free print and play games or games using easily obtained components (dice, playing cards etc.) would be best.

Any ideas would be appreciated but I would particularly welcome references to specific parts of the English schools curriculum that the games could be used for.
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Chris Stanton
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Poker's quite good for covering probability
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James Fehr
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I don't know of any games that "teach" how to do math, but there are plenty that give students good practice.

I've had success using the Tivitz series of games (e.g. Space Tivitz) for all ages. Each game comes with lots of different types of numbers printed on the game sheets, so it can be as simple as single-digit arithmetic, or as complicated as exponents and large fractional numbers. This series is unique in that while a significant amount of actual math is involved, the game play itself is pretty fun, and it forces students to do estimating in their heads before doing the actual math problem later on. Doing the math is actually just part of the score-keeping process once the game is finished.

I've also used Equate, which is basically Scrabble with numbers. It's harder than it looks.
 
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いい竹やぶだ!

South Euclid
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SET is often used in teaching probability, combinatorics and set theory. Several papers on the subject are available here.
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Enrique G.
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You can check out some card games, such as Straw, Zeus on the Loose, and Boom-O. Is mostly adding and substracting. Hope this helps.
 
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The Dude
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Are you looking for a game to teach mathematics or arithmetic?
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Grand Prince Poutine Lord High Thrifter
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You could investigate whether Tuf might suit your needs.
 
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Scott Moore
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Not teaching, but practising what has been taught.
 
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Scott Moore
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Well, arithmetic is a sub set of mathematics

Basically anything that 11 to 16 year olds are taught at school. I'm not the teacher - it's for a friend who's a teacher but who doesn't (yet) know the world of boardgaming.
 
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Jeremy Brown
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Incan Gold is a great game for practicing division skills. I second the recommendation for Straw. I would also check out Number League: Adventures in Addiplication (the expansions introduce negative integers, multiplication, etc) - the best place for more information and purchasing this particular game is at http://www.bentcastle.com/nl.htm.

Note that Numbers League would be more suitable to the lower age range/ability than the other recommendations I've mentioned.
 
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Mark Saya
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Tumblin-Dice involves a lot of adding and multiplying. It's very easy to teach, accommodates up to four players or teams of players, and is a raucous, fast moving game that I think kids would love.
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Witek Wasilewski
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Power Grid involves mathematical parts of brain - should be good for teaching.

Edit: obviously my brain has skipped the part about PnP.
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いい竹やぶだ!

South Euclid
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Juxtatype wrote:
You could investigate whether Tuf might suit your needs.


I also thought of Tuf, but only at the highest level of play does it get beyond arithmetic, and at least the students at the high end of the age range will need something more advanced.
 
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TTorres
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Kingdoms, and it was just reprinted by Fantasy Flight Games. It's a spreadsheet, and really all about math.
 
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Chris Kohlman
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I used to teach special ed. math for students in this age range.

I didn't use PnP so I can't comment on that aspect, but a few games worked well for me.

I will reference the Alberta (Canada) curriculum when I discuss curricular links.

Blokus covers off some of the geometry curricular objectives (Transformations, Tessellations). It isn't all that expensive either.

I have recently discovered Fauna. It has some cross curricular links with science, and has a fair amount of measurement in it, and can use Metric or Imperial units. I just played it a few weeks ago and felt it would be best with ages +12 as there a fair amount of mental estimation using measurement in it.

Lost Cities uses a lot of adding and subtracting integers.

A lot of games use math and students practice with it, but in terms of checking off the "cover the curricular objective box", these may work.

All three of these games are not hard to teach and aren't freakishly expensive either.



 
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Scott Moore
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Thanks James. Space Tivitz looks really interesting but the physical game doesn't seem to be available to buy here in the UK. I know there is an online version, but classrooms here don't come equipped with a PC for every child
 
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Scott Moore
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Juxtatype wrote:
You could investigate whether Tuf might suit your needs.


This game could be useful, but it seems to be out of print and the components are not common ones. So I think this is a non-contender
 
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Scott Moore
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godunow wrote:
Power Grid involves mathematical parts of brain - should be good for teaching.

Edit: obviously my brain has skipped the part about PnP.


Well - very, very basic mathematics. It's my favourite game, but too long for the classroom (lessons are less than 1 hour!) and the maths is too simple for this age range (11-16).
 
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Agent J
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He's looking real sharp in his 1940's fedora. He's got nerves of steel, an iron will, and several other metal-themed attributes. His fur is water tight and he's always up for a fight.
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He's a semi-aquatic egg-laying mammal of action. He's a furry little flat-foot who'll never flinch from a fray. He's got more than just mad skills, he's got a beaver tail and a bill.
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So, we're talking algebra, algebra 2, geometry, maybe trig at 16... I honestly don't remember math at age 11, though.
 
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Scott Moore
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kohlhatter wrote:
I used to teach special ed. math for students in this age range.

I didn't use PnP so I can't comment on that aspect, but a few games worked well for me.

I will reference the Alberta (Canada) curriculum when I discuss curricular links.

Blokus covers off some of the geometry curricular objectives (Transformations, Tessellations). It isn't all that expensive either.

I have recently discovered Fauna. It has some cross curricular links with science, and has a fair amount of measurement in it, and can use Metric or Imperial units. I just played it a few weeks ago and felt it would be best with ages +12 as there a fair amount of mental estimation using measurement in it.

Lost Cities uses a lot of adding and subtracting integers.

A lot of games use math and students practice with it, but in terms of checking off the "cover the curricular objective box", these may work.

All three of these games are not hard to teach and aren't freakishly expensive either.



Good suggestions, thanks. Yeah, I've played Blokus - good game. It may be suitable for the 11-year-olds. Lost Cities is also a great game, but practising basic arithmetic is more suitable for 7-8 year-olds I would think.
 
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Agent J
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He's looking real sharp in his 1940's fedora. He's got nerves of steel, an iron will, and several other metal-themed attributes. His fur is water tight and he's always up for a fight.
badge
He's a semi-aquatic egg-laying mammal of action. He's a furry little flat-foot who'll never flinch from a fray. He's got more than just mad skills, he's got a beaver tail and a bill.
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It would take them way too long to add up their scores on their calculators.
 
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Scott Moore
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Jythier wrote:
So, we're talking algebra, algebra 2, geometry, maybe trig at 16... I honestly don't remember math at age 11, though.


The school is well above average, so bear this in mind. But, yes, introducing algebra for the lower ability classes at age 11. Trigonometry also for the 11-12 year olds.
 
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Scott Moore
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janos_hunyadi wrote:
Hi all,

I'm looking for games that can be used in a normal classroom environment (30 students) as an aid for teaching mathematics to 11 to 16-year-olds. Obviously given the limitations of school resourcing, free print and play games or games using easily obtained components (dice, playing cards etc.) would be best.

Any ideas would be appreciated but I would particularly welcome references to specific parts of the English schools curriculum that the games could be used for.


What the kids are being taught:
Key Stage 3 (11-14 years old)
- number and algebra: rational numbers; ratios; accuracy and rounding; linear equations; polynomial graphs
- geometry and measures: properties of 2D and 3D shapes; Pythagoras' theorem; transformations; 2D coordinate systems; perimeters, areas, surface areas, volumes
- statistics: presentation and analysis of grouped and ungrouped data; central tendency and spread; experimental and theoretical probabilities

Key Stage 4 (14-16 years old)
- number and algebra: proportional reasoning, direct and inverse proportion, proportional change and exponential growth; upper and lower bounds; linear, quadratic and other expressions and equations; graphs of exponential and trigonometric functions; transformation of functions; graphs of simple loci
- geometry and measures: properties and mensuration of 2D and 3D shapes; circle theorems; trigonometrical relationships; properties and combinations of transformations; 3D coordinate systems; vectors in two dimensions; conversions between measures and compound measures
- statistics: presentation and analysis of large sets of grouped and ungrouped data, including box plots and histograms, lines of best fit and their interpretation; measures of central tendency and spread; experimental and theoretical probabilities of single and combined events
 
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david landes
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oak hill
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It's probably better for the 11 and 12 year old group, but "24" is a great math game. Our county has a class, grade, region, and county-wide competition with 24.

Basic concept: you are given four numbers, each of which you must use once in an equation (using multiplication, division, addition, subtraction) on the way to 24.

Cheers.
 
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Gudjon Torfi Sigurdsson
Iceland
Isafjordur
Isafjardarbaer
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Even though it's not a PnP game, it should be relatively easy to make your own version of Take it Easy! / Dilemma, especially if you've got some hexes lying around. This game helps practice multiplication (and addition).
 
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