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Subject: Good Board Game to use in Consumer Finance rss

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Dave BLisard
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I teach a consumer finance class at the High School level in my district. The class are mostly students between 16 and 18. I'm looking for a good game that practices finance (Power Grid is an example) that is relatively easy to learn, and won't break my bank to obtain.

Thanks everyone!
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Walt
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This was discussed at some length recently, here: Games to teach high school students budgeting
 
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James Fung
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What is the objective of the consumer finance class? To have students make (and stick to) a budget? To warn them what happens if they go into credit card debt?
 
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say "em-cee-crispy"
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Tall_Walt wrote:
This was discussed at some length recently, here: Games to teach high school students budgeting
that list seemed pretty good; I'd certainly agree with the comment about "any Martin Wallace game" (well, his "proper" MW games). I'd also add Eclipse to the list; if you can't balance your actions and expansions against your income while planning for future income then your game will most assuredly go down the toilet. I should know. whistle
 
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Moe45673
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Panic on Wall Street!

Simple rules
plays in 30 minutes
Plays up to 11, the more the better

Two groups, landlords and merchants. Two winners, one landlord and one merchant.

Watch Joel Eddy's review:
http://boardgamegeek.com/video/18448/masters-of-commerce/dri...

From Ender's review:
Quote:
Capitalism comes alive: The economic theme really, really works well in Masters of Commerce, because really what is happening is a miniature economy, with rent agreements, a simple market system, and auctions. These aren't just game mechanics, but are business transactions that are drawn directly from real life. As such, the connection to the theme is very transparent, because you're actually doing the same kinds of things as people in the real world when making a rent agreement, paying rent or taxes, and so on. This helps makes the game easy to explain, and makes it very accessible for non-gamers, and perhaps even an ideal choice for a classroom session about economics and commerce. It has an additional advantage of being a great deal of fun when you really get into the theme, such as with the help of a lively auctioneer during the auction phase, or even with jokes about renters or greedy landlords during the negotiation phase. In some ways it really is like bringing the stock exchange right to your game table, as players haggle loudly and eagerly, looking to lock up the best deal they can!
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Dave BLisard
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That is the basic concept of the class. We also go into investing, making large purchases, and other things to plan for the future.
 
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James Fung
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There are some good suggestions already (I think Power Grid is a good choice), but I'll throw a few more out there for consideration:

Agricola: The budget is that you have to feed your family at the end of every round. And you have to plan ahead for big purchases like adding a room and major improvements. Also, unlike some games, you probably can squeeze Agricola into one class period. Cons: a lot of the game is grabbing the action you want before other people which, while it is a reflection of economic fighting over limited resources, does not have much to do with budgeting; also, instead of one currency, you're now juggling 6 (food, 2 crops, 3 meat).

Industrial Waste: Not budgeting enough cash to pay your workers sucks because you can go into debt. Investing too much money before you can make it back sucks because you can go into debt. Not reserving enough cash to avoid a fine by the EPA (you can draw similarities to why people buy insurance) sucks because you can go into debt. Going into debt sucks because you have to pay a bunch of money to get out. Cons: one strategy is to invest in the pollution track so that you can churn out products and rake in profits. At that point, there's not much of a budgeting problem.

Through the Ages: A Story of Civilization You do have to watch your food and mineral reserves carefully and plan turns in advance. Cons: probably way too long with lots of distracting other mechanisms to gave a good lesson.

I'll add my own comment to Wealth of Nations: in this game, you are expected to borrow money. Without capital, you can't invest, which means you won't grow, which means you'll be left behind. The trick is to not go overboard. I would draw parallels to paying for a college education. I just wish the game was a bit more fun.
 
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