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Subject: Is there more decision making in Silent War? rss

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Jesse A.
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Having played through my first two patrol games in Silent War, I noticed something:

It seems that almost everything is determined by rolling a die. The only things that I really see myself deciding is how to split up my submarine's attack points and whether or not to reattack.

So, my question is, am I right? Do the campaigns involve more decision making when/if I get there? Will the game develop my strategic or tactical skills? Am I unfairly biased from playing only the patrol games?

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Kenneth Lury
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Blowing rock
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I think you have found all there is to find. I played Silent War every evening for an hour for about six months to about half way through the entire war. In the beginning, it was engrossing, but after a while it turned completely flat. Repetitive, time consuming with no decisions to make. The game pretty much plays itself.

To be fair, the game is the result of a huge amount of research and the components are great. In the end, however, it is just a simulation, albeit a sophisticated one, much like B-29 Superfortress. Just keep rolling the dice and checking the tables.
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Christoph Haeberling
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8570 Weinfelden
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I do agree that Silent War is first a simulation and as such you are not able to rumble through the Pacific Sea and hunt down numbers of carriers and battleships which even the Japanese did not know of. No you are forced to slowly pile sunken tonnages like in reality. In this sense the War in the Pacific was "boring", repetitious, tedious and frustrating and the game simulates this very well. Patrols where in reality regularly less than glorious.

I do not agree that Silent War is like B-17 and B-29. In these two games you have one plane and very few decisions. Most decisions are forced upon by logic and only one you can freely decide: do I go home?

On the other hand in Silent War you have plenty of decisions, always from the view of ComSubPac. How many subs do I have at the various bases? Where do I go with my subs? What do I do with all the less than capable subs? When do I attack, when do I break off? When do I risk my better subs? Long marches or short marches to reach a hunting ground? Many decisions which are not right and not wrong. But you have to live with them!

There are many tables to roll a die, more than in B-17 but much less than in B-29. Tables are necessary in a solitaire game.

I admit that I must be in the right mood to play Silent War. But this is my problem and not the problem of the game. And I have to say that the campaign is for me much more interesting than a patrol.
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Jesse A.
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habchr wrote:
I do agree that Silent War is first a simulation and as such you are not able to rumble through the Pacific Sea and hunt down numbers of carriers and battleships which even the Japanese did not know of. No you are forced to slowly pile sunken tonnages like in reality. In this sense the War in the Pacific was "boring", repetitious, tedious and frustrating and the game simulates this very well. Patrols where in reality regularly less than glorious.

I do not agree that Silent War is like B-17 and B-29. In these two games you have one plane and very few decisions. Most decisions are forced upon by logic and only one you can freely decide: do I go home?

On the other hand in Silent War you have plenty of decisions, always from the view of ComSubPac. How many subs do I have at the various bases? Where do I go with my subs? What do I do with all the less than capable subs? When do I attack, when do I break off? When do I risk my better subs? Long marches or short marches to reach a hunting ground? Many decisions which are not right and not wrong. But you have to live with them!

There are many tables to roll a die, more than in B-17 but much less than in B-29. Tables are necessary in a solitaire game.

I admit that I must be in the right mood to play Silent War. But this is my problem and not the problem of the game. And I have to say that the campaign is for me much more interesting than a patrol.


Yeah, I get the impression that I really need to give the campaign a try as that seems much more involved than a Patrol game. Now I just need to find a way of playing a campaign without my cat destroying it during inactivity.
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Christoph Haeberling
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Quote:
Now I just need to find a way of playing a campaign without my cat destroying it during inactivity.


I recommend to mount an electrical fence around the game table. But do not forget to switch off when you are playing.
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Steve Pratt
United Kingdom
Bedfordshire
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I recommend to mount an electrical fence around the game table. But do not forget to switch off when you are playing.


This may well serve a dual purpose as my wife has many times threatened to swap some of the subs around whilst I'm at work, just to see if I noticed!!

Regards

Steve
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