Martí Cabré

Terrassa
Catalonia, Spain
msg tools
mbmbmbmb
This is an AAR of ASL scenario AP31 "First Cristot" that I played with Andy on PBEM between August and September 2012.

This is Andy:

Andy Beaton
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
I have a cunning plan
mbmbmbmbmb


These are the tanks involved in this scenario:























Vehicle drawings from http://ww2drawings.jexiste.fr/

"First Cristot" is set on Normandy in June 1944. A British infantry company is tasked with taking the hills south of Cristot, near the Carpiquet airport. In an otherwise flat terrain these hills provide excellent observation points to direct artillery fire. A group of five tanks is tasked with helping them.

The British lack effective cooperation between infantry and tanks and the tanks reach the hills without noticing that they have bypassed some landsers. The SS-Panzerdivision 12 has a section of Panzergrenadiers hidden behind the bocage walls with an AT gun and a couple of Panthers are coming to help them.

In order to win, the British must put some infantry on the hills. Notice that the British tanks are already there, but by SSR each British turn only the infantry OR the tanks can move, not both. This is a fun rule that puts much chrome in the battle.

I asked Andy to play this scenario because we had played "WO3 Counterattack at Carentan" (AAR:http://boardgamegeek.com/thread/872254/aar-of-wo3-counterattack-at-carentan-flanking-the) and I liked very much how the bocage rules distort the battlefield.


Here is our setup:


I took the Germans and Andy the British. I placed some infantry and dummies behind the Bocage, more or less grouped. There's not much space to run around in the scenario, it seems an Schwerpunkt scenario, and you have to maximize the position of each unit. The AT would provide cover in case the Shermans attacked the German rear. The Panthers would have to make do against the Shermans avoiding the pesky Firefly, the only one that can penetrate the Panther frontal armor.


This is the British advance:


Andy advanced his British troops in a three-pronged attack. On the north through a grain field against my strongest position. On the center following a sunken road, that led to my right flank. And on the south side (his right flank) against a lightly defended position, but also farthest from the objective.

I took an potshot with my AT gun against one of the British Shermans that was laying around in the road with no protection (aside from the scenario rain) and then turned it to face the British infantry.

A lucky British sniper shot destroyed my MG nest and my right flank was virtually exposed, but Andy did not know that and advanced cautiously.

On the British right I had some luck with the D1F and broke his scouting squads.

The Panthers entered cautiously looking for good shots against the Shermans while avoiding the Firefly.


This is the double combat: infantry vs infantry, tanks vs tanks:


The German line was disrupted when Andy launched an assault against my AT position. With no MG to defend it, the AT fired pot shots against the troopers on open sights and it ended in melee. Luckily, I had held the position by the sunken road with a combination of single HS and dummy units, while on my left the lone defending squad turned berserk and killed some British units, then it recovered and protected the road on that side.

Over the tank battle, the Firefly malf'd its gun and my Panthers quickly dispatched it, along with another Sherman. Another Sherman had gone up against my landsers to help the tommies and my PSK was disabled in its first shot against that tank. There was now only one Sherman protecting the hill against the Panthers and I intended to destroy it and send the Panthers to stop the British units from gaining the remaining yards.


Here is the rushed German defense:


I quickly withdrew all the German units to cover the northern woods, the most likely way to reach the hills. There was only a squad and two HS as the second squad was CX'ing from my far left flank. The two Panthers burned the remaining Sherman V and turned to hit the road again, as climbing the hill would be risky for the bocage and ineffective as there would be many hexes the British could just step.

The British attack in the center and right had been totally stopped with some units broken and too far away to intervene and only the British left could now win the day.


This is the end of the game:


The Panthers ran along the road and positioned themselves to cover the open ground by the northern woods. There was also a squad and a couple of HS there, covering with their bodies the approaches to the hills.

The British tried to PIAT the Panthers but failed and then they simply banzaied everyone and ran to the hills, but the landsers IFP and the Panthers' MG mowed them down.

German victory!
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Andy Beaton
Canada
Toronto
Ontario
flag msg tools
I have a cunning plan
mbmbmbmbmb
One thing I miss about the old 1980's style scenarios is having some time to advance methodically. Under time pressure, I always find myself having to take undesirable risks, and all too often, that 2-2 shot turns against me.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Martí Cabré

Terrassa
Catalonia, Spain
msg tools
mbmbmbmb
aiabx wrote:
One thing I miss about the old 1980's style scenarios is having some time to advance methodically. Under time pressure, I always find myself having to take undesirable risks, and all too often, that 2-2 shot turns against me.


Yes, the pace of the scenarios has evolved over time, from those where you had to manoeuvre and had even time to commit a mistake to those where any mistake can cost you the scenario.

I guess that's the players' skill has improved and they, as a group, demand tighter scenarios.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Brian Roundhill
United States
Lago Vista
Texas
flag msg tools
mbmb
ASLNoob wrote:
In this modern age players simply seem to prefer shorter scenarios where the units are already in action at the start.


I find that is one big difference in many longer scenarios - they often have an extra board to cross before the action begins. 3 boards wide and 9 turns vs 2 boards wide and 6 turns.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Martí Cabré

Terrassa
Catalonia, Spain
msg tools
mbmbmbmb
Roundhill wrote:
ASLNoob wrote:
In this modern age players simply seem to prefer shorter scenarios where the units are already in action at the start.


I find that is one big difference in many longer scenarios - they often have an extra board to cross before the action begins. 3 boards wide and 9 turns vs 2 boards wide and 6 turns.


Yes, I'm playing the Beyond Valor scenarios and they seem so huge and long compared to the modern scenarios.

It's true that using VASSAL now there's more time to play than when playing was only FTF, but also if you play PBEM, with three or four emails per week, you can spend a month alone just moving your units into position before the action begins. It can really be very boring!
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Martí Cabré

Terrassa
Catalonia, Spain
msg tools
mbmbmbmb
Well, you can't blame them. VASL is so practical! Set up and clean up are much faster and space is not an issue. There is no FOBA and no KOBA.

If you don't like PBEM you can always play live on VASL and with a webcam you have the best of both worlds.

Only drawback you drink alone.

And you can't throw the board against your opponent's face when you lose. Dammit.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.