More Games Please: Art in Board Games Interviews

Please find excerpts from my blog 'Art in Board Games' where I talk to different board game designers and illustrators about their work. www.moregamesplease.com It's a companion piece to my IG: www.instagram.com/moregamesplease

1 , 2 , 3 , 4  Next »  

Recommend
13 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide

Anthony Coffey & Jesse Labbe: Art in Board Games #34

Ross
United Kingdom
Nottingham
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb


Anthony Coffey & Jesse Labbe: Art in Board Games #34

2018, INTERVIEW

Editors Note: This week I'm talking to not one, but two artists from indie publisher Certifiable Studios. Their names are Anthony Coffey and Jesse Labbe and after spotting their amazing work on the Kickstarter game 'Who Goes There?' I got in touch to find out more.

Hi Anthony/Jesse, thanks for joining me! For our readers who aren't aware of your work could you tell us a bit about yourself and what you do?

Anthony: Hey Ross, I'm an 2D/3D artist and game designer. I moved here (Ridgeland, Mississippi), from Dallas, when I was brought on to Certifiable Studios. I work on anything from game mechanics, illustrations, and 3D modeling; to animation, rules, or graphic design layout. The team is small, so we all tend to wear a lot of hats around here. It sounds redundant, but free time is usually spent doing more drawing or working on concepts for future projects.

Jesse: Well I would wear as many hats as Anthony does but I have a funny shaped head, so I am pretty particular about what I put on it. It's mainly because of that I don't do any 3D molding or animation (again only because of my misshaped head not because I don't know how). But I do, however, do a lot of illustrations as well as game mechanics.

You work together at an indie publisher Certifiable Studios, so before we get to the games can you tell us more about how the studio was set up, what your goals are and how the team got together?

Anthony: I'll defer to Jesse since this one is more for him. haha

Jesse: Well at first, I wanted to make a hat company, but then Rick (also at Certifiable) reminded me about my deformed head...so I thought what else can we do? GAMES! Let's make some games! Actually, I have been into tabletop games since I could remember. Fireball Island was a pin in my childhood timeline. Soon after that, Hero Quest began to open my eyes to all the possibilities that you could create with a game; the worlds that could be designed and all the adventures to be had exploring them. With such a love for illustrations, games just felt like the natural next step.
I worked on a couple of games under the roof of other companies and learned a lot of Do's and Don'ts. I had an idea for a game called "Ash to Bone", but wasn't ready to hand it over to someone else. I partnered up with Rick More (the brains of the studio) and Tah-Dah...Certifiable was born. We wanted to start small before going into "Ash to Bone" because it was a larger project, so we came up with "Endangered Orphans". That was received on Kickstarter better than I would have ever imagined. Next came "Who Goes There?" followed by "Stuffed". Now we are finally back to where we started....about to start production on "Ash to Bone".

The studios first release Endangered Orphans of Condyle Cove was successfully Kickstarted back in 2016. What can you remember about that project and what lessons did you take away from it moving forwards?

Jesse: Wow, where to begin? If there was a checklist of all the things not to do, we would have checked "yes" to each thing on the list. We seemed to do everything wrong for that (our first) Kickstarter. We had nothing about the game on BGG (Board Game Geek). We did a cold launch having never mentioned anything about the game to anyone. We didn't have even one video showing a play through. We didn't have the rules posted. We had no stretch goals prepared and we were constantly telling everyone that this is an awful (as in mean theme) game! But, we were really lucky and had some amazing backers come aboard during that campaign. It was because of them we were able to do what we did with the success of that game. We had so much fun during that campaign. We even received a ton of gifts from the backers, which I have since learned was unusual. Dozens of bags of coffee, t-shirts, toys, whiskey, letters, hats, cookies, flowers, stuffed animals and a lot of pants (it's a long story). Wow, gotta love our backers!

Anthony: During this Kickstarter project, I was helping from Dallas. Jesse asked if I could sculpt the pawns for a game they had on Kickstarter which is how my part in "Endangered Orphans" started. By the time I came to work at the studio full time, "Endangered Orphans" was already in the final stages and being sent to the factory for production and I helped set up print files for the production assets for the game. I had learned a lot about the process from the short amount of time I was working with Panda (our production facility we used on EO). I have also had a small amount of experience working with factories in China from a previous job, so that helped me hit the ground running when I started here.

Who Goes There? was a massive success on Kickstarter last year, were you surprised and why do you think it did so well?

Anthony: I think we were all surprised with how well the campaign did. We all had high hopes, but I don't think any of them were that high. I think part of the success of Who Goes There? is definitely owed to the success of Endangered Orphans as well as the dedicated backers it brought. We also try to be very responsive and transparent when dealing with our backers and I think the level of communication and honesty adds to that. With Who Goes There? we knew where we wanted the game to end up in terms of quality, so we set our stretch goals accordingly. There are always things that come up during a campaign, but for the most part we tried to have the campaign and unlocks planned.

Jesse: I would have been ecstatic if we would have just done as well as we did for Orphans, but when we started shooting past it, I was definitely on cloud nine!
I think we were prepared for the stretch goals this time. We didn't want to just start throwing too many random things at the end of the campaign because we were hitting goals. We had the game the way we believed it should be, so once we hit all of the Stretch goals...

======================================================

For the full interview plus more art please go to: More Games Please
Twitter Facebook
2 Comments
Wed Apr 18, 2018 11:21 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Nick Nazzaro - Art in Board Games #33

Ross
United Kingdom
Nottingham
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb


Nick Nazzaro: Art in Board Games #33



To read the full interview with tons more amazing art please head to More Games Please

===============

Hi Nick, thanks for joining me! For our readers who aren't aware of your work could you tell us a bit about yourself and what you do?
Thanks for having me, Ross! I'm an illustrator based in Los Angeles working in TV animation. Right now I'm at Starburns Industries working on a show for HBO called Animals. I've also done lots of work for magazines, motion graphic firms, and various types of merchandise. Basically I just draw all day long.

Could you tell us a bit more about your development as an artist? Where did you start out and how do you think this broad experience has helped shape how you work?

I came from a family of artists so I started drawing very early on. I think every birthday involved me getting crayons or sharpies up until I moved out as an adult. I went to an arts high school in Boston, and eventually an art college. It was just always the plan to do it professionally, full time.

One of my earliest gigs was illustrating a weekly column in a local Boston newspaper, called DigBoston. I drew some dicks, butts, and a lot of other vulgar stuff you'd find in an indie paper. It was great and I learned a ton by having to report in to an art director a few times a week. After that I started illustrating more for magazines, doing some gallery shows, and trying to make a name for myself by entering competitions. I finished school in the fall of 2013 and started working on Dragoon art in the spring of 2014. Been busy ever since!

Now I'm working at an animation studio in LA while still doing freelance whenever I get a chance. You do learn a lot from all these various industries and I'm fortunate that I've gotten to be involved in so many cool projects. Working in animation has forced me to be a lot more efficient in how I use photoshop, for sure. Working in motion graphics for Buck Design reinforced a lot of my editorial illustrator roots. Working in games was incredibly rewarding and I've learned a lot about mass production and printing of art assets. I could honestly probably write a book about all the skills I've picked up while working after being done with school.



You are a co-founder of Lay Waste Games, so how did that come about and what were your goals when you set up the publisher?
My personal origin story is a little different than the rest of the founders behind Lay Waste Games. The rest of the team is two brothers and their childhood best friend, and they were setting out to make a single game happen, pretty much. They found me to do the art for the game, eventually, and after it being way more work than anyone expected, I wound up as co-founder when we made the LLC. The original goal was to make Dragoon a reality but that was such an instant success for us, our goals have evolved. Now we want to make a lot of games for the foreseeable future.

What can you remember about Dragoon and how did you need to change your style to suit the format of board games?
That's a good question. You always have to change what you're doing a little to make it fit into the constraints of actually printing something. That's really a big part of the fun and challenge of making anything on this scale, though. The 3D pieces might have looked different if we weren't worried about sharp angles ripping the mold apart. The map could maybe be even more colorful if we weren't limited to using 6 colors for cost reasons. When things are printed small, you can only manage so much detail. All those constraints helped me figure our creative solutions that in the end looked really sharp, I think...

===============
To read the full interview with tons more amazing art please head to More Games Please
Twitter Facebook
0 Comments
Wed Apr 4, 2018 1:43 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Katie O'Neill - Art in Board Games #32

Ross
United Kingdom
Nottingham
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb


Katie O'Neill - Art in Board Games #32

Editors note: The Tea Dragon Society card game is still in production with Renegade Game Studios (due Q2 2018), as such there is no finalized art from it in this interview. There are some process images later in the article, however, the vast majority of art on show is from the graphic novel this game is based on or Katie's portfolio.

Hi Katie, thanks for joining me! For our readers who aren't aware of your work could you tell us a bit about yourself and what you do?
I'm an illustrator (mainly making graphic novels for kids), living in a small city in New Zealand. It's a pretty inspiring country to be an artist in! As an artist, I'm self-taught and posted my work online as webcomics for several years while I worked part-time as a copywriter. One day my editor emailed me and asked if I'd like to work with Oni Press, and it basically kept snowballing until I reached the point I'm at now, drawing for a living! I'm also an avid gardener, hiker and general nature enthusiast. And of course, I love tea.

You describe yourself as a self-taught, so when you were starting out how did you develop yourself as an artist and what illustrators or works inspired you?
Thankfully I grew up just as art communities on the internet were starting to flourish, so as a teenager I had access to a lot of digital artists to look up to as examples, and a number of them made tutorials that helped me grow and understand the software I was using better. Nowadays I probably use very few of the actual techniques that I learned then, but gaining that initial confidence to work digitally and intuit drawing software was extremely valuable.

Your beautiful graphic novel 'The Tea Dragon Society' is being turned into a card game, so could you tell us more about the graphic novel itself? How did you first come up with the idea and what is it all about?
The Tea Dragon Society came from a very simple idea I had, cute pet dragons that grow tea leaves on their horns, which ended up growing and growing as people showed a ton of interest in the idea. Eventually, I had enough to craft a little story about the characters who look after them, in this case, a blacksmith named Greta, a shy mystical girl named Minette, and the bonded owners of a tea shop, Hesekiel, and Erik. The tea dragons are extremely fussy (as players will discover when playing the card game!) so there is a danger of losing the art of caring for them, and of brewing the tea. The book is about appreciating traditional crafts and finding new meaning and value in them.

You say the story is really about appreciating traditional crafts, so what draws you to this message and are there any ways you think we should be doing this in general?
I think there's so much to learn from traditional methods arts and crafts, and other things such as making and growing food. They can take a lot longer, but the products are so beautiful and there's so much more intention and engagement with the process. I think it's important to keep knowledge of old crafts alive for their own sake, but they're also beneficial for the practitioner, encouraging patience and mindfulness. There are so many ways, and I think one of the best ones is to join a local group where you can learn from those with more experience.

So as I mentioned previously your graphic novel is being turned into a card game. How did that happen?
I'm super lucky in that Oni Press has really amazing connections with merch and board game developers, so all I've had to do is supply the artwork! Oni Press came to me about the idea and I was definitely aboard, and also completely into leaving it all to the professionals. The developers (Renegade Game Studios) captured the atmosphere of the book so perfectly, the first time I playtested it, even with simple mock-up cards, I knew it was just right. After the gameplay essentials were worked out, I was given a list of art assets to create....

To read the full interview with behind the scenes art and sketches head to More Games Please
Twitter Facebook
2 Comments
Mon Mar 26, 2018 2:37 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
18 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide

Kyle Ferrin - Art in Board Games #31

Ross
United Kingdom
Nottingham
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb


Kyle Ferrin - Art in Board Games #31

================================

Quick editors note: I've recently changed the format of how I conduct my interviews. Previously I had always stuck to a predetermined list of questions (with follow up ones hidden behind the scenes) which was a decision I made when trying to get the site up and running with a good amount of regular content. As the site has now passed the grand old age of 9 months I've decided to move away from that fixed format a little into more organic and personal questions. Below is the first fruits of this and I hope you enjoy the results.

================================

Hi Kyle, thanks for joining me! For our readers who aren't aware of your work could you tell us a bit about yourself and what you do?
Yeah! I'm a board game illustrator that works for Leder Games. I illustrated Vast: The Crystal Caverns and I'm currently working on Root and Vast: The Mysterious Manor. I've also done work for Norwester Games on their "Stitches" title, and a few other commission jobs that should be revealed soon! I live, (and work) just north of Salt Lake City, Utah with my wife and 4 kids.

When you start work on a new project what are the first few things that you do?
If I have my choice I like to be heavily involved in the theme of a game. I get a rough idea in my head of what I'd like the game to look like and then it's a matter of making a lot of sketches and collecting references to run by the game designers/publishers. I'm constantly in my sketchbook and in some cases, like with Root, it was a case of building a concept around sketches that I'd already made. I was going through a small animal with swords phase and I had multiple people ask me on twitter if the characters I was posting were from anything. I guess they are now!

You mentioned you were going through a small animal with swords phase, where do you think that came from and how did it develop?
My 5th Grade teacher read Redwall by Brian Jacques to our little class and I think I read a sizable chunk of the series into junior high school. I don't remember a lot of details but I remember the feeling it gave me and that overall vibe has been something I've enjoyed revisiting. Other influences include David Petersen's wonderful Mouse Guard comics and my obsession with Disney's Robin Hood. I can still quote pretty much ALL of Robin Hood, including background music and sound effects. Obviously what we ended doing for Root is still a pretty far departure from those art styles, but those worlds were pivot points when I was doodling little warrior creatures for my kids or for myself.

Your first board game project was VAST so how did you get involved and what do you remember about the project?
Vast was my first big foray into board game illustration. It was originally called "Trove" and the original designer, David Somerville, was looking for goblin art to accompany his work. He found a goblin illustration I did for the RPG Dungeon World, and when David sold the game to Patrick Leder, my name came along as an option. Patrick and I work on the same wavelength and I've been on the Leder Games team ever since. I started out as a contractor, but when Vast saw the success that it did I was hired on full time to work for Patrick.

The thing about board game illustration is that if you are working closely with the game designers then some things that you've worked really hard on get axed. Play-testing reveals that a certain card doesn't work, or the production constraints restrict the number or tokens that can be printed affordably. It's better to have an overarching vision of what you want the game to look like than to be married to any particular aspect.

I was also very fortunate to have people relate to my Vast art. There are SO MANY new board games, and a huge spectrum of art styles. To help us stand out I tried to embrace a line-art heavy style a la Advanced Dungeon & Dragons monster manuals, but with a vibrant color palette. We wanted to keep Vast looking accessible and family-friendly, which meant keeping the goblins looking more mischievous than violent, and making sure the heroine protagonist was fully clothed. I get a lot of comments from the board game community about how appreciative they are about the sensible armor for the Knight.

Vast was when I first started going to game conventions too. That was a whole new world for me. I think if you would have asked me 10 years ago how many people there were in the US that were REALLY into board games I would have estimated less than a thousand, haha. I just had no idea! I've always loved board games but most of my experience was with Risk and Monopoly and whatever was in my grandma's closet. I'll never forget my first Gen Con on that Thursday morning when an older gentleman struggled a little to lift up the Vast box and asked "How much is this?" and I sheepishly answered $60, not wanting to break his heart. He said, "I'll take one" and his son rounded the corner with 2 enormous bags full to bursting with what must have been thousands of dollars of board games. On Thursday Morning. The first few minutes of the convention! I've fully embraced the board game lifestyle since then, and I have a modest little collection of games, mostly for playing with my wife, my siblings and my adult friends since my kids are all pretty little.

How has playtesting your art influenced what you create? What lessons have you learned and is there anything in particular you're more mindful of now?
It's fun to see people play test a board game while you're still working on the art for it because you get almost immediate feedback on what people are interested in. Especially with Vast, when the rules for each player are so different, players are choosing roles based on theme and aesthetic. Unless you have a pretty good understanding of how Vast: The Crystal Caverns Goblins work going in, you probably aren't going to say "Oh, I'll be the green guys because I like push your luck mechanics." You're a lot more likely to hear something like "Oh! I want to be this Dragon" because of the theme and the art. That's where I think it's important that you're doing the game designer's work justice. How a game works isn't always immediately clear, but you can say a lot about what the players will feel like by..

======================================

To read the full interview with behind the scenes illustration, sketches and photos please visit: More Games Please.
Twitter Facebook
0 Comments
Mon Mar 19, 2018 1:39 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
4 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

STEVEN PRESTON: ART IN BOARD GAMES #30

Ross
United Kingdom
Nottingham
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb


STEVEN PRESTON: ART IN BOARD GAMES #30
March 5, 2018

This week I'm joined by Steven Preston an artist and art director who recently worked on Skyward: The Airborne City (which was voted into the Top 10 Best Board Game Art of 2017) with Rule and Make.

Hello Steven, thanks for taking the time to speak to us. Firstly, could you tell us a little bit about yourself?
Sure! Well, I currently live in Brisbane Australia and I love comic books, watching Japanese animation like One Piece and I also tend to waste a lot of time playing video games when I should be working on other things. I’ve studied a lot and have a diploma in graphic design and a bachelor’s degree in interactive and visual design.

Now we know a little more about you, I have to ask, as a child what did you want to be when you grew up?
When I was young I was always drawing a lot. Art was one of my favourite subjects in school, but as I got older I wondered if there was a career to be found in being an artist. So I tried some different things; like labourer, kitchen hand and other jobs which I was never really happy with. It wasn’t until I discovered comics that I realised there was a job you could have as an artist, which brought me back to wanting to be one again. I started working on becoming a comic artist, which eventually led to me studying graphic design and being an illustrator.

So how did you first get involved in making board games?
The very first board game I worked on was Robots & Rockets from Rule & Make. I got involved in that by chance really. I’m friends with the game's designer Sye Robertson and I remember they were posting a lot of work in progress (designs of the game) on their Facebook page. Sye was doing all the art and design for the game at the time, so I wasn’t involved at this stage and I remember there wasn’t even a budget at the time for the art, which is why he was doing everything himself. He approached me about creating some art for the game and originally just wanted a single robot done, but as he was happy with what I did it lead to me creating all the artwork.

An interesting part of the design was the need for a variety of head shapes in the robots so they were easily recognisable. Each one shown is busy at a different task, so they’re not all doing the same action. You can also see how the back robot changed from my initial sketch to the final drawing. I made the perspective a lot more prominent in the final just by changing the head angle. One thing Sye wanted with the cards was for the robots not be gendered. So for the card above originally, I was going to do a hat similar to a female air hostess, but that was later removed in the final illustration. The development of that game between myself and Sye was really great and it changed the way the game was originally going to be published. I think it was a real case of being in the right place at the right time.

When you are working on the art of a board game can you give us a quick overview of your creative or thought process and has this changed at all since you first started?
When I first started on Robots & Rockets there was no set template for the design of the cards. I had to design something that was really flexible and what I came up with was the idea of torso type shots and characters with no backgrounds. Another trick was to have a circle in the background and use the circle as a guide for keeping the art centralized.

Now I try and have the template design for the cards done fairly early in the art process, if possible, so I have an idea how much of the art will be covered up by the design. Of course, this template design can evolve as more art is produced and you can see if the design works on multiple cards with different art. As far as my thought process goes with the art itself, I tend to get my ideas fairly quickly just from the name of the cards and what the cards do. I then whip up a bunch of sketches and see if I’m on the right track with what I have in my mind.

You were involved in the creation of Skyward, so could you tell us a little bit about what that involved and what were the biggest challenges you faced?
My original role on the project was to create all the illustration work for the game, but as the game progressed it became evident that if we were going to make the deadline of having all the artwork completed before Kickstarter launch I would need help. This deadline was a big challenge for me since the art style we'd originally planned for Skyward was fairly time intensive. It would have been a struggle to do all the artwork myself as originally planned so the decision was made to bring in more artists to lighten my load and to change the art direction of the project which would also speed up the process...

To read the full interview with behind the scenes art please head to More Games Please.
Twitter Facebook
0 Comments
Tue Mar 6, 2018 9:46 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

DONNING THE PURPLE: THE ART IN KICKSTARTER #1

Ross
United Kingdom
Nottingham
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb


DONNING THE PURPLE: THE ART IN KICKSTARTER #1
February 26, 2018
Welcome to a new feature focusing on Kickstarter games. As I often talk to game designers and artists involved in Kickstarter projects it seemed only right that I give this some more attention on my site.

For this first article I'm happy to be joined by Petter Schanke Olsen, of Tompet Games.

Hello Petter, and thanks for taking the time to speak to us. Firstly, could you tell us a little bit about yourself?
I live in Norway and I’m a movie producer by day and a board game designer by night. I launched my first game on Kickstarter in 2016 and that was a light war game called ‘Kill the King’. Now, I'm Kickstarting my second game which is called ‘Donning the Purple’.

I also run a blog where I interview other board game creators about the different tactics they use on Kickstarter.

I have played board games all my life but kind of rediscovered them again when I played games like Dominion and Agricola 3 or so years ago. Now I tend to play medium to heavy strategy games. The longer the better!

So, can you describe your Kickstarter game to us and what makes it interesting?
Donning the Purple is an asymmetrical king of the hill game with a bit of worker placement. Each player leads a powerful family in ancient Rome, trying to get the most victory points during 4 rounds. If your family member becomes the emperor and manages to hold the position he can earn lots of points. However, he will also become the target of the other players, as they will try to dethrone him and become the new emperor themselves.

How long have you been working on this game? What made you launch the campaign now?
I have worked on the game for 1.5 years. It is now finally complete and we have come to a place where we want to be in regards to the marketing so this seems to be a good time to launch. February is also a good month to launch in general.

Why Kickstarter?
We have paid for the art and prototypes ourselves but we need your help to get the funds to print the game. We chose Kickstarter as our crowdfunding platform because that is where the board gamers are.

What was the inspiration or core idea that drove your work on the art?
I have two different art styles in the game:
For the game board, I wanted an old and detailed styled map. So I contacted Daniel Hasenbos who is a cartographer and we worked out a style for the map and it has now become the main attraction of Donning the Purple. Daniel carefully illustrated every palm tree, monument, and coastline. He has a great eye for detail and by intense research has added historically correct buildings and monuments throughout the Roman empire.

Joeri Lefevre provides the other art style in the game. He has made all the card art and the amazing box art. I wanted his art pieces to be classical and to depict different situations in the daily life of Roman people and I think he has done an awesome job. I gave Joeri this sketch when I was telling him how I wanted the box art to look and this is what he turned it into.

Could you tell us about the biggest challenges you’ve faced in creating the art for this game and how you’ve overcome them?
I'm going to let my artists answer this:

Daniel Hasenbos:
"My job was to design the map for Donning the Purple. The map needed to show the Roman Empire at its height, covering most of Europe and the lands around the Mediterranean.

With this came the first challenge. The map needed to give an impression of the geography of the land, but at the same time, it shouldn't distract the players from the game itself. I decided to....

You can continue to read the interview with more artwork here:
https://www.moregamesplease.com/art-in-boardgames/2018/2/26/...
Twitter Facebook
4 Comments
Mon Feb 26, 2018 5:19 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
12 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

JACQUI DAVIS: ART IN BOARD GAMES #29

Ross
United Kingdom
Nottingham
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb


Here's an excerpt of my interview with Jacqui Davis, to read the full thing with sketches, process art and more please go to More Games Please

=====================================================

JACQUI DAVIS: ART IN BOARD GAMES #29
February 19, 2018

This week we have Jacqui Davis an artist who has worked with on games such as Ex Libris, Euphoria, Manhattan, Purrlock Holmes and Skyway Robbery and with companies such as Stonemaier Games, Dice Hate Me Games, IDW Games, and Game Salute.

Hello Jacqui, thanks for taking the time to speak to us. Firstly, could you tell us a little bit about yourself?
Hi! I’m a board game artist and kid’s book illustrator currently living in Lytham St Annes, a little town in north-west England. I really love it because one of my favourite things to do besides drawing is to go on walks and when the weather allows, this is England after all, there’s plenty of places to go to unwind.

Now we know a little more about you, I have to ask, as a child what did you want to be when you grew up?
It might sound cliché but I always wanted to be an artist ever since I realised that could be a way to make a living. There was a brief period where I considered becoming a scientist so I could invent either a morphing cube (thanks Animoprhs) or a stargate, but that didn’t pan out.

So how did you first get involved in making board games?
Originally I had studied to be an animator but I discovered you need a certain sense of timing that I don’t possess. I also can’t dance, much to my ballet dancer mother’s disappointment!

I got involved in board games after I graduated university. During my studies I followed a few artists who worked in board games, and a good friend Katy Grierson already worked in the industry so I learned a lot from her. The first two clients I had that really got me into the industry where Jamey Stegmaier of Stonemaier Games and Dann May at Game Salute, I really owe them a lot of thanks.

When you are working on the art of a board game can you give us a quick overview of your creative or thought process and has this changed at all since you first started?
I work almost entirely digitally in Photoshop on my trusty Cintiq. Typically my process goes; sketch – colour rough – final, with changes done in-between as I get feedback from my clients. I find the sketching stage the hardest because often if a brief is really exciting I’ll have a finished image in my head and I just want to skip to that and ignore all the boring bits.

Sometimes we nail a design on the first round of sketching, but on others, things get changed along the way. If the brief asks for something specific I’ll always do research while I sketch and I often end up with files filed of references after a project.



You were involved in the creation of upcoming game Neverland Rescue, so could you tell us a little bit about what that involved and what were the biggest challenges you faced?
I think the biggest challenge I had with this game was that we didn’t want to reference Disney’s version of Neverland. You’d think this would be easy, but for me at least that’s where I go when I think of Peter (Pan) so to break that mental image was a bit tough. It was hard not to do a foppish Hook or an impish Peter.

Though the temptation was there I didn't watch or look at images of the Disney versions of the characters. Some things still snuck in, Peter's a redhead, though we tried black hair and decided it didn't work. I went back and looked at the original book illustrations and stills from several stage productions to get ideas since Peter Pan....

========================================================

This is an excerpt of my interview with Jacqui Davis, to read the full thing with sketches, process art and more please go to More Games Please
Twitter Facebook
1 Comment
Mon Feb 19, 2018 5:33 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

ALEX CRISPIN: ART IN BOARD GAMES #28

Ross
United Kingdom
Nottingham
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb


ALEX CRISPIN: ART IN BOARD GAMES #28
February 12, 2018

The format is a little different this week as it's a recording of a live chat I had from last year. I'm interviewing Alex Crispin the illustrator of brand new game Escape the Dark Castle by Themeborne. As we both live in Nottingham it seemed only right we meet up in person to have a face to face chat.

If you'd like to see more artwork from the game and listen to that interview, please head over to the site: https://www.moregamesplease.com/art-in-boardgames/2018/2/12/...
Twitter Facebook
0 Comments
Mon Feb 12, 2018 6:27 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
6 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

JESSE RIGGLE: ART IN BOARD GAMES #27

Ross
United Kingdom
Nottingham
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb


JESSE RIGGLE: ART IN BOARD GAMES #27
February 5, 2018
This week we have Jesse Riggle an artist and illustrator who worked on the game Unearth with publisher Brotherwise Games.

Hello Jesse, thanks for taking the time to speak to us. Firstly, could you tell us a little bit about yourself?
Sure, aside from commercial work I do a lot of pop culture related paintings for gallery shows and I try to do a fair bit of personal work in my free time. I’ve also spent as much time as possible traveling the past several years.

Now we know a little more about you, I have to ask, as a child what did you want to be when you grew up?
I wanted to be an entomologist (insect scientist) or a cartoonist. I decided in my early teens to pursue the art thing instead of the science thing, but I still sometimes like to imagine a life living in a jungle looking for new bugs.

So how did you first get involved in making board games?

I’ve only worked on one game, and it was something that kind of found me. I did a series of pieces in an isometric style that resonated with the right people and it grew from there. I was super excited to work on the project, as I am a fan of board games and am impressed with the volume of amazing games coming out these days, it seems to be a rapidly evolving art form.

When you are working on the art of a board game can you give us a quick overview of your creative or thought process and has this changed at all since you first started?
My main focus is making art that people will enjoy looking at. It’s kind of secondary to the gameplay, but I think something that is aesthetically interesting adds another layer to the whole experience. I’m also concerned how to keep the art consistent, but unique enough that the different parts are identifiable at a glance.

You were involved in the creation of Unearth, so could you tell us a little bit about what that involved and what were the biggest challenges you faced?
For Unearth I was given the task of creating the overall look and feel of the game. It was based on a style I had already worked in so it came pretty naturally, but I was faced with creating a large number of pieces with unique settings. The biggest challenge...

To read the full interview with tons more art please follow the link to: More Games Please.
Twitter Facebook
0 Comments
Mon Feb 5, 2018 1:04 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
27 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

ANDREW BOSLEY: ART IN BOARD GAMES #26

Ross
United Kingdom
Nottingham
flag msg tools
mbmbmbmb


ANDREW BOSLEY: ART IN BOARD GAMES #26
January 22, 2018

This week we have Andrew Bosley an illustrator, concept artist, and game designer who has worked on games such as Everdell, Mission: Red Planet, Citadels, and the upcoming Planecrafters and with companies such as Asmodee, Game Salute, and Ubisoft.

Hello Andrew, thanks for taking the time to speak to us. Firstly, could you tell us a little bit about yourself?
Sure! I grew up in Southern California with a passion for drawing. Had very supportive parents that helped me follow that passion. Took a pretty typical art journey that led to studying illustration at San Jose State University, with my aim to become a visual development artist in feature animation. I interned at Hallmark Cards the summer before my senior year, finished up my BFA in 2006, and then changed directions a little and took a job in video game concept art. I worked in-house at Ubisoft for seven years and then decided to go freelance in 2013. Now I live in cool, northern Arizona with my wife and five kids.

Now we know a little more about you, I have to ask, as a child what did you want to be when you grew up?

I always wanted to be an artist. For a long time, I thought that meant being a Disney animator. Then I decided I wanted to be a children’s book illustrator. I was only exposed to the type of work I ended up in after entering SJSU.

So how did you first get involved in making board games?
I have always loved board games! But it was never something on my radar when it came to work. It was just something I liked to do. After starting my first job as a concept artist in the video game industry, I looked for ways to scratch my illustration itch through freelance work. I got lots of RPG art commissions from the smaller companies. Then some of the bigger publishers took me on. By the time I went full-time freelance, I thought the only options for illustrators in tabletop games was in the RPG market. I went to a fantasy illustration convention looking for opportunities with the biggest publishers and failed miserably. But while there, I met an artist that would soon become a good friend named Bryan Fyffe and he pointed me away from the fantasy illustration rat race towards board games. It was the perfect fit for me and my style. I was fortunate to have established some good connections in the industry and board game jobs starting coming in. Also, when I moved to Arizona, I also started developing my own board game. That led me to GenCon, which led me to lots of new board game clients. While I still do a lot of video game concept art for work, I feel like board games will soon be my long-time home.

When you are working on the art of a board game can you give us a quick overview of your creative or thought process and has this changed at all since you first started?
When it comes to creating the actual illustrations, the process has evolved as I’ve changed as an artist. The process of making the art itself is probably pretty boring to normal people. But I have always had a love of art direction, graphic design, and brand identity and that is probably the thing that I enjoy the most when it comes to creating art for games. Helping to form the overall look of a game/product. When I work of others, I rarely get to look at the big picture in that way. But for my own brands, whether they’re games or apps or stories, I love the process of creating meaningful, iconic themes in style and storytelling.

You were involved in the creation of Mission: Red Planet, so could you tell us a little bit about what that involved and what were the biggest challenges you faced?
Yeah, I had the privilege of doing the cover art and all the character card art for the rebooted Mission: Red Planet. Mission: Red Planet is a great game with some history. Bruno Cathala and Bruno Faidutti created the original back in 2005 with a great artist named Christophe Madura. My job, ten years later, was to create a new look that had...

------------------------
To read the full interview with behind the scenes sketchwork please follow the link here
Twitter Facebook
0 Comments
Mon Jan 22, 2018 1:35 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls

1 , 2 , 3 , 4  Next »  

Subscribe

Contributors

Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.