More Games Please: Art in Board Games Interviews

Please find excerpts from my blog 'Art in Board Games' where I talk to different board game designers and illustrators about their work. www.moregamesplease.com It's a companion piece to my IG: www.instagram.com/moregamesplease

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ANDREW BOSLEY: ART IN BOARD GAMES #26

Ross
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ANDREW BOSLEY: ART IN BOARD GAMES #26
January 22, 2018

This week we have Andrew Bosley an illustrator, concept artist, and game designer who has worked on games such as Everdell, Mission: Red Planet, Citadels, and the upcoming Planecrafters and with companies such as Asmodee, Game Salute, and Ubisoft.

Hello Andrew, thanks for taking the time to speak to us. Firstly, could you tell us a little bit about yourself?
Sure! I grew up in Southern California with a passion for drawing. Had very supportive parents that helped me follow that passion. Took a pretty typical art journey that led to studying illustration at San Jose State University, with my aim to become a visual development artist in feature animation. I interned at Hallmark Cards the summer before my senior year, finished up my BFA in 2006, and then changed directions a little and took a job in video game concept art. I worked in-house at Ubisoft for seven years and then decided to go freelance in 2013. Now I live in cool, northern Arizona with my wife and five kids.

Now we know a little more about you, I have to ask, as a child what did you want to be when you grew up?

I always wanted to be an artist. For a long time, I thought that meant being a Disney animator. Then I decided I wanted to be a children’s book illustrator. I was only exposed to the type of work I ended up in after entering SJSU.

So how did you first get involved in making board games?
I have always loved board games! But it was never something on my radar when it came to work. It was just something I liked to do. After starting my first job as a concept artist in the video game industry, I looked for ways to scratch my illustration itch through freelance work. I got lots of RPG art commissions from the smaller companies. Then some of the bigger publishers took me on. By the time I went full-time freelance, I thought the only options for illustrators in tabletop games was in the RPG market. I went to a fantasy illustration convention looking for opportunities with the biggest publishers and failed miserably. But while there, I met an artist that would soon become a good friend named Bryan Fyffe and he pointed me away from the fantasy illustration rat race towards board games. It was the perfect fit for me and my style. I was fortunate to have established some good connections in the industry and board game jobs starting coming in. Also, when I moved to Arizona, I also started developing my own board game. That led me to GenCon, which led me to lots of new board game clients. While I still do a lot of video game concept art for work, I feel like board games will soon be my long-time home.

When you are working on the art of a board game can you give us a quick overview of your creative or thought process and has this changed at all since you first started?
When it comes to creating the actual illustrations, the process has evolved as I’ve changed as an artist. The process of making the art itself is probably pretty boring to normal people. But I have always had a love of art direction, graphic design, and brand identity and that is probably the thing that I enjoy the most when it comes to creating art for games. Helping to form the overall look of a game/product. When I work of others, I rarely get to look at the big picture in that way. But for my own brands, whether they’re games or apps or stories, I love the process of creating meaningful, iconic themes in style and storytelling.

You were involved in the creation of Mission: Red Planet, so could you tell us a little bit about what that involved and what were the biggest challenges you faced?
Yeah, I had the privilege of doing the cover art and all the character card art for the rebooted Mission: Red Planet. Mission: Red Planet is a great game with some history. Bruno Cathala and Bruno Faidutti created the original back in 2005 with a great artist named Christophe Madura. My job, ten years later, was to create a new look that had...

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To read the full interview with behind the scenes sketchwork please follow the link here
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Mon Jan 22, 2018 1:35 pm
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TANIA WALKER: ART IN BOARD GAMES #25

Ross
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Below is an excerpt from this weeks interview with Tania Walker. To read the full interview with images please follow the LINK HERE

TANIA WALKER: ART IN BOARD GAMES #25
January 8, 2018
This week we have Tania Walker an art director, illustrator and graphic designer who has worked on games such as Dracula’s Feast, The Lady & the Tiger, and Goblin Quest, and with companies/publishers such as Jellybean Games, Rule & Make, and Greater Than Games.

Hello Tania, thanks for taking the time to speak to us. Firstly, could you tell us a little bit about yourself?
Hi, thanks for having me! Aside from spending most of my time making adorable games, I write as a sideline and have been published in several speculative fiction magazines. I live in Tasmania where it’s nice and cold (fun fact: parts of Australia are, occasionally, snowy!) and, outside of my assorted creative work, my proudest accomplishment has been teaching my cat to walk on a leash. I love tabletop roleplaying games and it’s a bit of a life’s dream to work as the Art Director on a project along those lines - so if you’re reading and you’ve developed something like that... (makes the ‘call me’ gesture).

Now we know a little more about you, I have to ask, as a child what did you want to be when you grew up?
At first, I wanted to be a vet, like James Herriot. Then I realised this would require putting down a substantial number of animals, and I’m too much of a softie for that. Next, I got obsessed with Disney films and decided I wanted to be a Disney animator. That one, I never grew out of – by the time I was 21 I was working for Walt Disney Animation Australia.

So how did you first get involved in making board games?
Achieving my life’s dream at 21 was eye-opening. Setting aside the 70-hour working weeks, what I found at Disney was that I didn’t enjoy being a cog in an enormous machine. Turned out what I really wanted was not to work with a specific company, but rather, the chance to shape my creative work in a meaningful way. After that, I spent years bouncing from one kind of art job to the next, looking for the elusive role that would let me feel like I had creative freedom and trust within a team of like-minded people.

During that time I also started playing modern tabletop games. Killer Bunnies was first. I recall looking at the art and deciding: “I could do a better job of it. I’d love to do this someday.” Yet it didn’t occur to me to aim for a job making boardgames; I didn’t think that was something you could do in Australia, and I had already decided against moving overseas for my career, as I love where I live.

So I continued freelancing and periodically working for companies in a wide variety of art and design jobs. One day an old acquaintance from Brisbane approached me – I’m sorry, this is the most Australian employment story ever – he was a guy who’d once bought a fridge from me, and he’d decided on the basis of my DVD collection that we should be friends, and added me on Facebook. We’d loosely kept tabs on one another ever since. That guy was Peter C. Hayward. He told me he’d started a boardgame company – Jellybean Games – and as he admired my art, would I like to come on board as a freelancer to work on a game called ‘Dracula’s Feast’?

What I found at Jellybean was a team of like-minded people who shared my creative goals and sense of humour, and who valued my contributions. Jellybean quickly became my core client, and I’m extraordinarily proud of the games we’ve made together.

When you are working on the art of a board game can you give us a quick overview of your creative or thought process and has this changed at all since you first started?
My role has deepened – initially, I was just a freelance illustrator with Jellybean, but as an art director I get a more substantial opportunity to shape the look and feel of our games. What I love about this role is that I get to think about the art of our games both from a macro and micro point of view – I have to consider how all the elements will work together as a package, but also have to zoom my attention close in to every tiny illustration and icon and border and make sure that each of these works individually. For tabletop games, illustrations in particular need to stand up to repeated scrutiny, because they’re going to be looked at again and again, sometimes for extended periods of time. If an illustration is low quality or if some detail is wrong, people will notice, and it’ll bother them.

So, at the start of a new project the whole team develops a theme for the game. It must reinforce the game's mechanics, must be relatively original (or at least be an original take on an old theme), and to be honest it has to be a theme we can all get excited about – because if we’re not interested in it, the art won’t be interesting and the players won’t be interested either.

I then start to think about broad art decisions like what kind of style and colour palette communicates this theme best? Realistic? Stylised? Cartoony? Pastel watercolours? Dark and gritty digital painting? What feel does this choice create; what expectations will it set up about the nature of the game? There’s a whole world of choices and approaches out there. I also consider what else is currently in the marketplace, and how we can make this game stand out from that crowd. For this last reason, I avoid the straightforward ‘semi-realistic saturated digital painting’ style, because no matter how well it’s done, it’s so prevalent right now that any game using it will visually merge into every other game on the shelf. I also consider: what are my strengths as an artist, and am I the best artist to create the kind of art this game needs?

Once all this is nailed down to the team’s satisfaction, I begin to gather references and visual inspiration, and from there I create my first card for the game (or the box art, in games that aren’t as heavily card-based), and that becomes both my place to experiment with technique and, when it’s done, my touchstone for the game art that follows.

I also do a lot of the graphic design for Jellybean, and I tend to develop that in conjunction with the illustrations, which allows me to get a more visually cohesive approach going than you’ll often get when a designer comes along once the illustrations are done and just designs around/over them.

There’s so much more to it than this, but you did say “briefly”, and I think I’ve blown past “brief” some time ago. I’ll add that the above encompasses what’s changed for me since I started with Jellybean: I’ve gone from creating illustrations on spec, to developing the look and feel of a game before I begin illustrating.

You were involved in the creation of The Lady & The Tiger, so could you tell us a little bit about what that involved and what were the biggest challenges you faced?
The great thing about L&T is that Peter just happened to approach me with this game idea that ticked all my personal creative boxes. I’ve always drawn cats of all kinds, and I adore drawing women, and here was a game entirely built around women and (very large) cats. Furthermore, we quickly agreed that my ‘core’ style – clean, bright and Disney-influenced – would be ideal for this game, which removed the usual start-of-project period I spend figuring out how to pull off a brand new style.....

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To read the full interview with images please follow the LINK HERE
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Mon Jan 8, 2018 1:39 pm
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Results - Best Board Game Art of 2017

Ross
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Nottingham
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WHICH BOARD GAME HAD THE BEST ART OF 2017?
I asked for your help to find out which game released in 2017 had the best overall artwork and your response far exceed my expectations. Over eight days you nominated more than 80 different games for the award, illustrated by first time artists all the way to industry favorites. Only the top 10 most nominated could make the final list and once the nominations closed you voted in your hundreds to bring us the results below.

A LITTLE BIT ABOUT THE VOTE
I decided to do this on a whim, after waiting for a vote about board game art to take part in but not finding any. I decided to create my own and from this decision to the page going live only a day had passed. I feel like it's important we continue to talk about the art in games and as my website is designed to highlight the artists it felt right that I should use this platform to encourage that conversation. It's filled countless hours over the last few weeks and I hope it inspires you to think back and consider the games and art you've loved. Mainly, I feel honored to have had you along for the ride in this experiment.

A HUGE THANK YOU
I’d like to send out a massive thank you to all who took part, from the people who put in a nomination or vote, to the artists and all of those who made these games happen. This vote is for you.

The top 10 nominees were:
- Campy Creatures
- Fugitive
- Lisboa
- Modern Art (CMON)
- Near and Far
- Nemos War (2nd Ed)
- Photosythesis
- Skyward: The Airborne City
- The Lost Expedition
- Yamatai

Click here to find out the results!
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Fri Jan 5, 2018 2:47 pm
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LESS THAN 12 HOURS TO GO - BEST BOARD GAME ART VOTE

Ross
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Nottingham
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We're now in the last 11 hours of the vote for best board game art, hundreds of votes have been cast but the positions are far from decided.
Now's the last chance to have your say if you want to take part.

WHICH BOARD GAME HAD THE BEST ART OF 2017?
I need your help to find out which game released in 2017 had the best overall artwork and together we've narrowed it down for this vote.

THE SHORTLISTED GAMES WERE NOMINATED BY YOU
I asked for your suggestions and you did not disappoint. There were more than 80 different games nominated for the award, illustrated by first time artists all the way to industry favorites, but only 10 of those could make the final list. Below are the 10 most nominated games.

THE ART IN BOARD GAMES IS IMPORTANT
I started this site because I love board game art and want us to talk about and celebrate it more. Art has the ability to enhance and transform our game experiences and this vote is a way of showing the industry that we care and are passionate about it too.

VOTING IS NOW OPEN
The vote for Best Board Game Art of 2017 will be open from now until 31/12/17 (11.59pm BST). As choosing favorites is tough I've decided to make things a little easier for you by allowing you to select as many games as you like. Once the vote closes I'll tally all the entries and announce the top 3 most voted for games.

Top 10 Nominations:
- Campy Creatures
- Fugitive
- Lisboa
- Modern Art (CMON Edition)
- Near and Far
- Nemos War (2nd Edition)
- Photosynthesis
- Skyward: The Airborne City
- The Lost Expedition
- Yamatai

This is a new award, so please share to spread the word. I'd love as many of you as possible to get the chance to have your say.
Thank you to all the creators out there and for those who take part. Happy voting!

Best Board Game Art 2017 - Vote Here
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Sun Dec 31, 2017 1:30 pm
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VOTE - BEST BOARD GAME ART 2017 (48 HRS TO GO)

Ross
United Kingdom
Nottingham
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One week of voting down, a couple of hundred votes cast. Two days left before voting closes so there's still time to get involved and have your say.

WHICH BOARD GAME HAD THE BEST ART OF 2017?
I need your help to find out which game released in 2017 had the best overall artwork and together we've narrowed it down for this vote.

THE SHORTLISTED GAMES WERE NOMINATED BY YOU
I asked for your suggestions and you did not disappoint. There were more than 80 different games nominated for the award, illustrated by first time artists all the way to industry favorites, but only 10 of those could make the final list. Below are the 10 most nominated games.

THE ART IN BOARD GAMES IS IMPORTANT
I started this site because I love board game art and want us to talk about and celebrate it more. Art has the ability to enhance and transform our game experiences and this vote is a way of showing the industry that we care and are passionate about it too.

VOTING IS NOW OPEN
The vote for Best Board Game Art of 2017 will be open from now until 31/12/17 (11.59pm BST). As choosing favorites is tough I've decided to make things a little easier for you by allowing you to select as many games as you like. Once the vote closes I'll tally all the entries and announce the top 3 most voted for games.

Top 10 Nominations:
- Campy Creatures
- Fugitive
- Lisboa
- Modern Art (CMON Edition)
- Near and Far
- Nemos War (2nd Edition)
- Photosynthesis
- Skyward: The Airborne City
- The Lost Expedition
- Yamatai

This is a new award, so please share to spread the word. I'd love as many of you as possible to get the chance to have your say.
Thank you to all the creators out there and for those who take part. Happy voting!

Best Board Game Art 2017 - Vote Here
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Fri Dec 29, 2017 2:29 pm
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VOTE - BEST OVERALL ART OF 2017

Ross
United Kingdom
Nottingham
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WHICH BOARD GAME HAD THE BEST ART OF 2017?
I need your help to find out which game released in 2017 had the best overall artwork and together we've narrowed it down for this vote.

THE SHORTLISTED GAMES WERE NOMINATED BY YOU
I asked for your suggestions and you did not disappoint. There were more than 80 different games nominated for the award, illustrated by first time artists all the way to industry favorites, but only 10 of those could make the final list. Below are the 10 most nominated games.

THE ART IN BOARD GAMES IS IMPORTANT
I started this site because I love board game art and want us to talk about and celebrate it more. Art has the ability to enhance and transform our game experiences and this vote is a way of showing the industry that we care and are passionate about it too.

VOTING IS NOW OPEN
The vote for Best Board Game Art of 2017 will be open from now until 31/12/17 (11.59pm BST). As choosing favorites is tough I've decided to make things a little easier for you by allowing you to select as many games as you like. Once the vote closes I'll tally all the entries and announce the top 3 most voted for games.

Top 10 Nominations:
- Campy Creatures
- Fugitive
- Lisboa
- Modern Art (CMON Edition)
- Near and Far
- Nemos War (2nd Edition)
- Photosynthesis
- Skyward: The Airborne City
- The Lost Expedition
- Yamatai

This is a new award, so please share to spread the word. I'd love as many of you as possible to get the chance to have your say.
Thank you to all the creators out there and for those who take part. Happy voting!

Best Board Game Art 2017 - Vote Here
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Sun Dec 24, 2017 12:49 am
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BEST OVERALL BOARD GAME ART OF 2017

Ross
United Kingdom
Nottingham
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As 2017 draws to a close I'm already becoming nostalgic for another amazing year of games.
I can't help but wonder though, what was the best looking game of 2017?

I need your help to find out which game released in 2017 had the BEST OVERALL ARTWORK.
Will the art be created by an industry favorite or a newcomer to the scene? A small indie game or a juggernaut release?

That's down to YOU.

Nominations are open until 21/12/17 (5pm BST) and you can NOMINATE AS MANY GAMES AS YOU LIKE, so get your suggestions in.
Only the TOP 10 nominee's will make it through to for the final vote between 22/12/17 and 31/12/17.
Who will make the list and who will be the bell of the board game ball?

Oh and if you need help remembering what's been released, here is a handy list of all the games from 2017 via Boardgamegeek.

CLICK HERE AND HAPPY NOMINATING!
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Wed Dec 13, 2017 2:55 pm
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EILEEN TJAN: ART IN BOARD GAMES #24

Ross
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EILEEN TJAN: ART IN BOARD GAMES #24
December 11, 2017
This week we have Eileen Tjan a Designer who has worked with on games such as Pyramid Arcade, Zendo, and Fluxx. She also develops branding, collateral, and online marketing graphics with companies such as Looney Labs and Asmodee Digital.

Hello Eileen, thanks for taking the time to speak to us. Firstly, could you tell us a little bit about yourself?
I’m a designer and art director from Chicago IL but I’m splitting my time between working in Chicago and Detroit on a magazine called Grand Circus Magazine, an arts and culture publication! In Chicago, I run a design practice called OTHER Studio. We’re a multi-disclipinary studio but I think we’re most known for branding. In the past, I’ve worked on award-winning projects; across many industries and tasks: advertising, production, traditional branding, print and digital. But right now, I’m really enjoying the work I’m doing with my clients at OTHER and spending free time teaching a little, lecturing, hosting community events, and developing the magazine with my partner Alex Trajkovski.

Now we know a little more about you, I have to ask, as a child what did you want to be when you grew up?
My elementary school yearbook said I wanted to be an ACCOUNTANT! Totally different path haha. Other kids wanted to be astronauts, cowboys, or vets but young Eileen dreamed of being an accountant!

So how did you first get involved in making board games?
I was leaving my full time job to pursue freelance design and the Looneys were my first freelance client. At first, they just wanted some assistance designing a newsletter template and it ended up in a relationship to assist with their branding! When we went through the branding process and started to develop a good design relationship, they approached me with the Pyramid Arcade project, a compilation of their most popular Pyramid games.

When you are working on the art of a board game can you give us a quick overview of your creative or thought process and has this changed at all since you first started?
I think with a lot of game art boxes, there’s a very specific story or theme that can inform the game art. You can say oh this game is about space or animals, and immediately you have some visual information. Pyramid Arcade is a special case because it’s actually the compilation of 22 games each with different back stories, and the game pieces and boards themselves are not always literal so we had to be very conceptual with the art.

When we were tackling Pyramid Arcade the studio had recently brought on a young designer, Abe Zieleniec and he worked on this massive project with me. We start all project processes the same, we create mood boards to represent all the different conceptual directions we could explore. From there we dive into first round designs based on selected mood boards.

Before the Looneys landed on Pyramid Arcade, the set was called “Pyramid Throwdown” which is what you see in our preliminary art. We looked at logotype, general art elements, and tried to best assemble those pieces together. The box art front was the easiest place to start visualizing the look/feel of the game. I think we presented 3 options, 2 of mine and 1 from Abe. We ended up working out and producing the entire game based on the original pitched artwork. It’s pretty similar to what you see out now!

You were involved in the creation of Pyramid Arcade, so could you tell us a little bit about what that involved and what were the biggest challenges you faced?
I sort of touched on this in the last question, but the biggest challenge is that there’s no literal interpretation of the game outside of the pieces. So, we had to concept an entire art style and brand around two pieces of information...

To read the full interview with more images and prototype art please go to More Games Please: Interview 24
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Tue Dec 12, 2017 11:13 am
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GEORGE DOUTSIOPOULOS: ART IN BOARD GAMES #23

Ross
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GEORGE DOUTSIOPOULOS: ART IN BOARD GAMES #23

December 5, 2017
This week we have George Doutsiopoulos an artist who has recently worked on board game STEM: Epic Heroes and with publishers such as Hologrin and Desyllas Games.

Hello George, thanks for taking the time to speak to us. Firstly, could you tell us a little bit about yourself?

Hi Ross! You are very welcome and thank you for the kind invitation. I am a full-time freelance illustrator living in Thessaloniki, Greece. I work with publishing houses and companies, painting for storybooks, book covers, games, and advertising.

Now we know a little more about you, I have to ask, as a child what did you want to be when you grew up?

An artist! There were, of course, the occasional dreams about becoming an astronaut, an archaeologist or an astrophysicist, but I have been passionate about sketching and drawing ever since I could hold a pencil.

So how did you first get involved in making board games?

Well, to begin with, I absolutely love board games! Things like the fun memories of being a kid playing Hero Quest have stayed with me and inspire me both as an adult gamer and as an artist. Looking back, it is very clear to me that I have always wanted to be a board game illustrator, although I took it more seriously rather recently. A couple of years ago I did a few boxtop illustrations for Desyllas Games, a big board game company in Greece. I remember thinking “hey, I really like doing this”! The next step was to enrich my portfolio with some personal work that I felt would attract the kind of board game jobs I would prefer the most.

When you are working on the art of a board game can you give us a quick overview of your creative or thought process and has this changed at all since you first started?
It’s really not very different from the process of creating any other illustration project. The first thing is to make sure I have a very detailed and thorough brief. The preferred art style, palettes, target group, theme, dimensions, etc. are things I need to know beforehand. When I have everything I need I just stare at the brief for a few minutes (or tens of minutes!) and try to visualize the finished game – what it looks like, what playing it feels like, how my friends and I would react to it and what kind of art would make it as fun and memorable as possible. The next step is research and finding a reference from online sources. I love doing research for the visual elements of my illustrations (faces, clothing, buildings, etc) because it also serves as a form of brainstorming, although it can become time-consuming. The rest is pretty straightforward. I draw my sketches as close to what I envisioned as possible and try to figure out the final palette. When all is approved I move on to the finished artwork.

You were involved in the creation of STEM: Epic Heroes so could you tell us a little bit about what that involved and what were the biggest challenges you faced?

STEM is a card game that centers around prominent figures from the realm of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math, and their inventions/discoveries. My job was to paint character cards. In order to create rich and accurate illustrations, I needed to do extensive research for every character and find a reference for their face, body type, clothing, inventions and so on. A good facial likeness was important to me but sometimes finding appropriate reference was difficult, especially if the character lived before the 20th century. Another important challenge was keeping balances. I needed to find a good equilibrium between realism and cartoonism, historicity and superheroism....

To read the full interview with illustrations and behind the scenes sketch work please go to: More Games Please.
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Wed Dec 6, 2017 12:05 pm
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TODD SANDERS: ART IN BOARD GAMES #22

Ross
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TODD SANDERS: ART IN BOARD GAMES #22
November 27, 2017
This week we have Todd Sanders an artist and designer who has designed games such as IUNU, They Who Were 8 and Aether Captains with companies such as LudiCreations and MAGE Company. He’s created a variety of Print and Play (PnP) games, best known of which are: Mr. Cabbageheads Garden, Odin Quest and his Shadows Upon Lassadar series. He’s also provided graphic design for Trick of the Rails for Terra Nova Games and has done the artwork for many Age of Steam maps for Alban Viard of AV Game Studios.

Hello Todd, thanks for taking the time to speak to us. Firstly, could you tell us a little bit about yourself?

I live in Pittsburgh where I work as a graphic designer, furniture maker and publisher. I have a degree in architecture but have worked as a graphic designer for over 25 years. My publishing company, Air and Nothingness Press (which is also the name I design games under - www.aanpress.com) publishes translations of French surrealist poetry, science fiction, and fantasy, and makes handmade artist books.

Now we know a little more about you, I have to ask, as a child what did you want to be when you grew up?
From an early age I always wanted to be an architect. I was an architectural designer for a few years upon graduation but then moved into graphic design due to the work availability in Pittsburgh in the mid-1990s.

So how did you first get involved in making board games?
I began by redesigning older games and I’m most known for my re-visions of Barbarian Prince (over 3000 downloads on BoardGameGeek.com) and for Hammer of Thor. Both of these were originally released in the early 1980s, long before computers or better printing techniques and there is a mystique about them, but both are long out of print and therefore inaccessible to most players.

Barbarian Prince is one a lot of people wish would be reprinted. You play a barbarian trying to find gold to save your kingdom, wandering a map of various terrain types, rolling dice to find events and encounters on various tables. It combines aspects of wargames, RPGs, and Choose-Your-Own Adventure style games. I completely redesigned the entire map, created new rule and events books and a series of player sheets and counters to give the game a better scope. It took me a couple of months to complete but I think the changes make it feel more like a modern game.

Hammer of Thor is a very strange game from around ‘83 that can apparently support between 1 and 65 players, although 1 or 2 players is probably best. You play Viking gods and visit locations throughout the nine realms encountering various types of creatures and humans. You combat these beings and in turn, can make them part of your clan. The game mainly uses cards (which were originally badly printed on construction paper) and a large map of Yggdrasil, the world tree of Viking myth. My work included redesigning (and correcting the errors of) over 720 cards, designing 1100 counters and I updated/redrew the map. On top of this, I completely rewrote the rulebook to remove a huge number of errors in the original text and updated the language for modern board gamers. It was over 6 months work and I really didn’t design anything for many months afterward because the task left me exhausted.

For both games what appealed to me was the challenge of taking older games and giving them a fresh modern look. As a graphic designer, I am attracted to projects where a design overhaul can give a value and prominence to games in our history that are overlooked by many. For Barbarian Prince I also wanted a copy to play and this was a fun way for me to make that happen.

From there I entered several of the designer contests that the Print and Play community sponsors and slowly began learning to process of design games. There are several of these contests every year on BGG. The Solitaire PnP contest (every summer), the PnP Wargame contest, the 18 card contest, and the Mint Tin contest where all components must fit inside of an Altoids tin. In the past there have also been game contests with constraints like only using dice, fitting the game on a single sheet of paper, or only being able to use 9 cards.

When you are working on the art of a board game can you give us a quick overview of your creative or thought process and has this changed at all since you first started?

I tend to work on both the structure and mechanics of the game while doing the artwork. It’s a very organic process and both elements grow together. I am not an ‘artist’ artist, meaning I don’t really draw or illustrate anything by hand ever, I do all my work on the computer using InDesign and Photoshop, often using those applications as you would Adobe Illustrator (but I don’t own a copy of that).
Early on I tended to do redesigns of earlier games. In taking apart another designer’s work and re-visioning it, you learn the inner workings of the mechanics and how the game is put together, thereby learning something about the design process. I suppose the best thing I have learned is to be open with my work and let people interact with it as it is being designed. Everyone has different experiences and knowledge. Their input can only make a game stronger, especially since one tends to design in a bubble so you can quickly convince yourself that something works. This is because in your head it does, but you often find that once you write rules other people find holes in this logic as you didn’t impart that understanding within the framework of the game itself.

You were involved in the creation of IUNU, so could you tell us a little bit about what that involved and what were the biggest challenges you faced?
IUNU, which made its debut at Essen 2017 is a game where the basic idea came very quickly: 9 types of cards where the point value of the card is the direct inverse of the number of cards in the deck. The game spent about a year of development with LudiCreations and I’m lucky in that I am the graphic design/artist for my own games with LC. Part of the appeal of these games is my minimalist artwork. LudiCreations staff and I work pretty well together after...

For the full interview with artwork please go to: https://www.moregamesplease.com/art-in-boardgames/2017/11/25...
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Tue Nov 28, 2017 1:03 pm
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