Everything that sucks! And some things that don't.

Nuggets of wisdom amidst incoherent ramblings. You're welcome.

1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5  Next »  [41]

Recommend
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Germanizing Games (New And Improved!) - Furchtbar schön!

Christian Heckmann
Germany
Mainz
Rheinland Pfalz
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Here's a disclaimer: Even though this series of posts is called "Germanizing Games", unless further reinforced, I don't suggest that all of the games featured on this article have original English titles. "Germanizing" is just a handy word that doesn't one-hundred-percent describe what I am doing here. Also this list isn't meant to be comprehensive when it comes to box cover artwork and it's not supposed to focus on this. Excursions into this subject are to be understood rather as a bonus than the centerpiece of these articles, which is the differences and similarities between English and German titles of board games (no matter which one is the original). That said, I don't own all of the board games out there, I can't double-check everything, I have to work with what the Geek gives me. If there are factual errors in what I write here, I'll be thankful for corrections.

Right, where were we?





I feel like this early-ish Jamey Stegmaier/Alan Stone design has kind of fallen out of favor with the BGG-crowd ever since Stonemaier has published higher-profile stuff in recent years. I like it. Haven't played it in a while, but... I like it. Just wanted to clarify that. But we're not here to talk about stuff like that, no, we're talking translations. Euphoria: Build a Better Dystopia was translated by the German branch of ADC Blackfire (I don't really know what the relationship between this one and the two other ADC Blackfires, the ones from Romania and Czech, is...) and they chose a... strange name. I mean, it's technically correct. The German version of Euphoria: Build a Better Dystopia is called "Euphoria: Die perfekte dystopische Gesellschaft erschaffen". As said, kind of faithful, but it still sounds a bit off, perhaps because for some reason, they went with the infinitive instead of the rather addressy form of the original, turning it into the equivalent of "Euphoria: To create the perfect dystopic society". Why perfect instead of better? I don't know, perhaps because us Germans tend to not do things halfway?





This one's weird. Like... really weird. As is so often the case, I don't know exactly which one came first. Designer Bruno Faidutti is French and the first French edition of Citadels was called "Citadelles", so perhaps that's it and the English version is far closer to the original? Anyway, for the German version, publisher Hans im Glück went deep into bad pun territory for... really no reason whatsoever. In German, we've got the expression "Ohne Furcht und Tadel", usually used when describing heroic knightly types, literally meaning something like "without fear and reproach". The German version of Citadels changes that to "Ohne Furcht und Adel", basically "without fear and nobility". I kind of see what they did there, but it is definitely quite heavy-handed.





I'm cheating a bit, yet again. See, the upper image is from the second edition of Tales of the Arabian Nights, the lower one is technically the German version of the first edition of Tales of the Arabian Nights, but that version was published 14 years after the original and is supposedly far closer to the second edition and OH MY GOD, I DON'T KNOW EITHER! The thing is, it's called "Geschichten aus 1001 Nacht", literally "Tales of a thousand and one nights". Apparently, the base material for the game, the stories princess Scheherazade told to a Persian king for a thousand and one nights straight, were known under that name in English as well, before the name "Arabian nights" became more popular. In Germany, we still know it under that name, "Geschichten aus den arabischen Nächten", or however one would translate the English title, never caught on. So yeah, that's what the German version of that game (kinda) is called. Also the tagline reads "Ein Spiel um phantastische Erzählungen und abenteuerliche Reisen", "A game about fantastic tales and adventurous voyages".





Oh Heidelberger... What have you done this time? I suppose in an effort to strengthen some form of brand-recognition, the guys and girls at Heidelberger decided to firmly link the German version of A Game of Thrones: The Card Game (Second Edition) to their board game based on the same property (they already did so with the first edition, though, so that's not that new). They dropped the "A" from the title (probably because German buyers could get confused and ask "So this is only 'A' Game of Thrones, right? Where are the other ones?") and smashed the subtitle "Der eiserne Thron" ("The iron throne") into the midst of it without any regard for the consequences, giving us the great title of "Game Of Thrones: Der eiserne Thron - Das Kartenspiel (zweite Edition)". Say that five times in a row...







And another one where I'm not only not a hundred percent certain which one's the original and which one is the translation, also I need three covers to fully do this game justice. Oh, also squeamish readers, beware, there's gonna be strong language ahead. Courtesy of Amigo, not of yours truly. Don't shoot the messenger... Anyway, since the designer of No Thanks!, Thorsten Gimmler, is German, I guess the German title is the original one, even though most of the other language versions seem to have flocked to the English naming conventions, mostly adopting their equivalents of No Thanks!. Not so here in Germany, mind you, because remember? Nation of poets and philosophers and stuff. So we don't know No Thanks! under the name "Nein danke!", as you would assume naturally. No, in Germany, for the longest time, the game was called "Geschenkt... ist noch zu teuer", roughly "For free... is still too expensive". Rolls right off the tongue. Also in Germany, we use the expression "Geschenkt" (which usually means something like "gifted" or "bestowed") as an equivalent to your dismissive "Forget it!". So far, so weird. Now, in 2017, Amigo Spiele released a new version with new artwork and a new title. What that new title was, you ask? Well, I'm glad you did. It's "Schöne Sch#!?e". I'm gonna go out on a limp here and assume that the strange characters in the middle of the second word are supposed to conceal the fact that the game's "real" name is "Schöne Scheiße". It's a multilingual release, though, so an English rulebook was provided and that calls the game "Shitty Luck" (or rather "Sh#!?y Luck"), which is probably appropriate (or... isn't?) but a closer translation of the German title would probably be something like "Nice shit" or perhaps a bit less vulgar "Fine mess". To round things out, the tagline of that version says "Aus dem Tagebuch eines Pechvogels", "From the diary of a jinx".

Twitter Facebook
0 Comments
Today 7:00 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
12 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Krazy Razes?

Christian Heckmann
Germany
Mainz
Rheinland Pfalz
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The weekend is upon us and it looks like it's gonna be filled with gaming yet again. So before the backlog gets out of control yet again, let's catch up on what hit the table quite recently.



K. really seems to like Habitats, because on Wednesday, she asked me to play a game of that one yet again. I'm not complaining. I like it a lot, too. It's probably the super-cool ceramic animal-pawns coupled with the pretty neat, efficiency-based gameplay (I maintain that the way the market works in this game might be thematically wonky, but it is oh so cool) and the cathartic act of cleverly comboing your acquired tiles in order to maximize your points. It's one of those "Why does it have to end now? I've still got plans..." games that I tend to gravitate towards. Chapeau, Mr. van Moorsel, you did really good on that one.



I lost by four points yet again. Probably because K. beat me on most of the goals. Partially of my own volition. I mean, one goal was "Keeping it close" and just look how lopsided I built my park. It was fun, though. Habitats usually is.



Afterwards I managed to persuade K. into giving Getaway Driver a try by touting it as kind of similar to Habitats. I mean, there is some common ground. It's a tile-laying-game (kind of) and on your turn, you can move your pawn(s) to the left, to the right or straight ahead. So it's basically identical, right? RIGHT? Anyway, K. played the driver while I took control of the police forces. Her escape went pretty well early on, I was able to buy a few upgrades (mostly more cars and a barricade) but she kept evading me. That is until she found herself backed into a corner and needed to backtrack pretty much to the start, wasting valuable cards in the process. I finally caught up with her with a car and the motorcycle and blocked her escape then and there.



It's hard to say where she made mistakes. She should have probably flipped some adjacent tiles more often. Sure, that increases the pursuit-meter, but if you can evade the police that way, it'll go back down in time. When I played the game solo, I didn't do so either, but that's mainly because the AI was pretty easy to outsmart, while a real opponent can certainly create some nasty traps. I'm really interested in playing it again, as the driver this time, as I'm eager to assess how hard it is to evade your opponent. It's a smart design and a beautiful game altogether. And the portability is a plus as well. Sure, the rulebook could have used another proof-reading-pass, but it's mostly clear to me now.



And finally, on Wednesday evening, we invited over some friends for a barbecue and after everyone had had their fill, we decided to play an eight player game of Krazy Wordz. Which took a bit longer than I had anticipated. I don't really know why, I mean, most of the gameplay happens simultaneously, so it shouldn't take that much longer than a regular game with... I don't know, five people or so. But at the end of the day, it lasted a whopping two hours. Which might be a tad too much if you asked me. But it was nevertheless fun.



A lot of interesting neologisms were coined that night. Like the Austrian confection of pastry "Stügli" or "Mudit", someone who leads you through the intricacies of a government agency (even though I was pretty sure that the latter would turn out to be an agricultural utensil). So yeah, even though it turned out longer than expected, Krazy Wordz was once again really fun and accomodates groups of that size quite well. I still don't know whether (and how well) it works for a non-German-speaking audience but I like it a lot.

Twitter Facebook
0 Comments
Fri Apr 19, 2019 7:00 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
20 
 Thumb up
1.00
 tip
 Hide

Top Five Thursday: Least helpful starting player rules

Christian Heckmann
Germany
Mainz
Rheinland Pfalz
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Just in case you hadn't noticed over the course of the last couple of Top Five Thursday posts, I'm kind of running low on worthwhile topics. I've still got a few things up my sleeves, and I could always phone it in with another "boring standard lists roundup", I guess, but yeah, just in case you had a great idea for a topic, feel free to comment on this article or drop me a Geekmail, that'd be great. Anyway, today we're talking about the...

Top Five Thursday: Least helpful starting player rules


Starting player rules are kind of a pet peeve for me. I like it if they are clever and novel and unique and really help you to decide on a starting player in a short amount of time. But not many games have those. Some have boring ones. Some don't have any at all. And some have ones that are utterly useless. Today, we're talking about the latter. Mostly. So without further ado, here's five starting player rules that probably won't help anybody.


#5: The worst swimmer from Lemming Mafia



Lemming Mafia is a great game and the way a starting player is chosen in it is kind of theme-appropriate, which is always a plus in my book. But at the end of the day, it's also utterly useless. The worst swimmer among all of the players is the one who shall start the game. How do you judge that? I mean, if you ask everybody how well they are able to swim, you'll most likely get answers like "Pretty okay" or "Quite well" or "Not so good". What is the actual question? Each player's best time swimming fifty meters or something like that? My swimming hasn't been timed since... I dunno, sixth grade or so. How am I supposed to know how well I can swim? I usually don't drown. Is that good? Eh...


#4: The nicest player from Dungeon Lords



To gleefully misquote Margaret Thatcher: "Being nice is like being a lady... If you have to tell people you are, you aren't". So whenever I played Dungeon Lords, choosing a starting player was kind of problematic, because either everybody insisted that they are the nicest player or multiple players didn't. I mean, at which scale are we even measuring the "nicety" of people? This doesn't make any friggin' sense!


#3: The best Egyptian credentials from Kleopatra und die Baumeister



Another one that's not only highly subjective but also prone to stalemates. So what does actually count as Egyptian credentials? The rulebook for Kleopatra und die Baumeister makes a few suggestions. A nose as famous as Cleopatra's. A mummified crocodile pet. An extensive hieroglyphic library. That's all very nice and stuff, but who has the right to judge whether you have "a nose as famous as Cleopatra's"? And what if someone with said nose plays against someone who hast a mummified crocodile pet? And the third person at the table has an extensive hieroglyphic library? You see that this isn't getting us anywhere...


#2: The last person to have been to space from Asking for Trobils



This is one kind of rule that crops up kind of regularly. The last person to have been somewhere. The person closest to some place. The thing is, this breaks down each and every time said game is played at that very place. I know that there's disagreement about whether we as a species are actually all "in space" at this very moment. I for one do think so. I mean, Earth is in space, right? And we're on Earth. So by extension, we're in space. Just because I'm in a submarine doesn't mean that I am not in the ocean, if said submarine is in the ocean. Then again, people might very well argue that "space is everything that isn't on Earth". Even then, you'd probably have a hard time agreeing on a starting player in a game of Asking for Trobils in this day and age, unless you regularly play with astronauts or aliens. Plus, this rule won't do the crew of the ISS any good if they wanted to play a game of Asking for Trobils during their off-time. Can somebody please think of the poor astonauts?


And #1: All of the darn games that instruct us to "decide upon a starting player"



That picture up there might not be too representative, because that's just five random games from my collection and they might have great starting player rules. The thing is, there are far too many games out there where the designers don't even put the effort in of choosing a thematically appropriate but impractical modus of designating a starting player. They just go with "Well, do whatever, I don't care". While I was browsing my shelf doing research for this article, I stumbled across dozens of games that couldn't be asked to just give me a simple rule to choose a starting player. Habitats. Lorenzo il Magnifico. Suburbia. It would have been simple to just go into the theme and choose something, no matter how stupid it would have been. But the designers didn't do that. And that's just lazy. Plus it doesn't really help. Sure, you might use the "take all of the scoring markers and drop one of 'em at random"-approach. But what if there aren't any of those in the game? You might roll a die but on multiple occasions, I was like "Okay, we need a die to choose a random starting player" and not a single one could be found within all of the games anybody had brought to game night (it's really surprising to find out how easy it is to haul a lot of games to a meetup without having a single die in them). Maybe somebody has a starting player app on their phone. Maybe nobody does. You've designed that game, you've put hours upon hours of work into it, yet when it comes to the finishing touches, you decided to choose the easy way out. That always bothers me a bit. So stop doing it. Please?

And that's it, those are... erm... more than four games with really unhelpful methods of choosing a starting player. Do you agree? Do you disagree? Do you not care in the slightest about this? Feel free to share your sentiments in the comments. Thanks for reading and see you soon.

Twitter Facebook
12 Comments
Thu Apr 18, 2019 7:00 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
17 
 Thumb up
0.01
 tip
 Hide

Keeping it casual for the weekend

Christian Heckmann
Germany
Mainz
Rheinland Pfalz
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Yes, I know, it's Wednesday already. But since I was out and about from Friday until yesterday, I couldn't really write about today's topic any sooner, so here's what I played over the course of the weekend. As implied, it's all rather casual stuff, no mindblowingly heavy fare to be found today, but that shouldn't dissuade you from reading on...



On Saturday, K. and me brought her copy of Klong! Im! All! (she does own the English original, but I never get tired of using that glorious German title) to the table when two friends of hers came over to celebrate my "Scheinfreiheit" (the fact that I cleared all of my university exams). K. was pretty eager to play this, because the last few times we had played it, I had whopped her hard and that had made her kind of competitive. Things got pretty intense early on, we found loads of Lord Eradicus' diaries (or whatever those things are), so the threat-level rose quickly. I also beat up Lord Eradicus when his card came up and attacks happened aplenty. It got clear pretty fast that we should hurry up a bit to grab what we could and get the hell out of there. K. had her hands on the 15 point artifact soon and was on her way back. I was in range of the 10 points but went "Nah, that won't suffice" and took a shot at the 30 point artifact, while the other two players managed to grab something in the mid-range. I was close to death at that point and had no illusions that I'd actually manage to reach the safe zone. But then, the strangest thing happened. Lord Eradicus was at maximum rage, K. had left the ship but for some reason, not a single attack-card came up and whenever K. drew her four cubes per turn, it didn't hurt any single one of us. That is until all of us had entered the safe-zone. At that point, the tide turned and after a single round, all of us had been knocked out. Still, we were able to tally points. K. won nonetheless. And escaping wouldn't have done us any good, she won 117:91:90:71 with me coming in third place. I have no idea how she managed to do that...



Klong! Im! All! is still very fun, although I think I'm rather in the mood to play the regular Klong! again next time. Our game of Klong! Im! All! dragged on a bit, clocking in at probably two hours or so. That wasn't too bad, as said, it was fun and the banter was good and that crazy finale was really tense, but at the end of the day, I kind of like the quicker pace of the original better. Ah well, they are both great games and I should probably try to get my hands on an expansion for one or the other some day.



Next up were quite a few games of Star Realms, probably my most played game of all time. "But you've only got six games of this logged", I hear you say. True. But I've played more than 200 games of this via the excellent app-version and I don't log those, so that might explain it. All of the games K. and me played over the course of the weekend were via app, too. Yes, I still own the physical version of the game (and quite a few expansions as well), but playing that is just a bit too inconvenient if you've got the digital version at hand, because as said, that one's awesome. It has a very good UI, the AI has been overhauled quite a bit ever since it first came out (I remember the AI copying an Explorer via Stealth Needle and then immediately scrapping their Stealth Needle... that no longer happens, I think) and in direct contrast to the Ascension: Deckbuilding Game-app, the "Play all"-button is worth a damn, because it tells you when you should use certain cards first, which is immensly helpfull. So great stuff all around.



I won most of our matches, because - without wanting to brag - I'm pretty good at the game. We played with pretty much everything but the missions added in (I'm not sure how much I like them, they are neat in concept but I found them to be kind of unbalanced the one time I used them...) and I noticed once again that there's a lot of cards that I don't really know yet. I mean, I know most of the original ones by heart, but even with Star Realms: Colony Wars, things get a bit hazy. Ah well, it's a great game (otherwise I wouldn't have played so much of it), perhaps I should try to get back into the online-scene, find out whether I'm really as good as I think I am. I probably am not. And that would be rather frustrating to find out, I guess...



After my recent belly landing, I also needed to prove to myself that I don't completely suck at Avenue. It worked... decently well. After a slow start (zero points during the second scoring, that's never a good sign), things picked up reasonably and come scoring number three, I raked in some serious points. At the end of the day, I didn't reach my highest score ever, but I played a pretty good game of it, almost doubling K.'s score.



I'm still debating whether I should migrate to Kokoro: Avenue of the Kodama at some point. Technically, this should be a no-brainer. The dry-erase-boards enhance the longevity of the game quite a bit and at the end of the day, you can play the same game with the Kokoro: Avenue of the Kodama-components, but the last times I played that one, it left me kind of wanting and I can't really explain why. Perhaps the permanence of the scoring-sheets is more to my liking, I mean, I'm keeping all of the sheets in my Avenue-box as a kind of hall of fame. Well, one day that pad is gonna run out and then, I'll have to reach a decision. For now, I've got enough sheets for about 30 more games, though, so I still have time, I guess.



And finally, Abluxxen, a game that kind of amazes me because I really shouldn't like it. It's utterly themeless and could very well be proxy'd by just using two regular card decks with matching backs, but ever since TripleThr3at introduced K. and me to it, I've played it over 20 times. Which is mind-boggling, because I don't even own it. I bought a copy some time and gave it to K. as a present, because she liked it even more than me. I should add that I pretty much exclusively play it two-player, because I really don't think that it plays well with more than three and the duel-rules actually work surprisingly well (especially considering that the two-player-game uses a kind of a dummy player... but yeah, it works). Who would have thought?



K. handily beat me once more. I felt super-clever for most of the game, only having two more cards in hand (two 13s) when she suddenly threw down seven sevens and was like "And with that, I win". Darn. Well, I think I'm gonna challenge her to a rematch sooner rather than later. If you haven't played Abluxxen, just grab two matching card-decks and give it a try, you might be surprised. And if you've only played it with more than two, check out the duel-rules, they are great!

Twitter Facebook
7 Comments
Wed Apr 17, 2019 7:00 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
17 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Where are the actual Harvest Moon board games?

Christian Heckmann
Germany
Mainz
Rheinland Pfalz
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I know, the franchise is for some pretty convoluted reasons officially called Story of Seasons now, but to me, it'll always be Harvest Moon. So I've been playing Harvest Moon: Hero of Leaf Valley lately. Yes, it's one of those. Didn't do this in quite some time, did we?



Anyway, it's a good game. Charming, fun, the graphics aren't anything to write home about from a technical point of view, but the game world is kind of cozy, so that's good. So while playing, a thought re-emerged. A thought that had crossed my mind on multiple occasions over the years. A thought that probably won't surprise you too much, because I've already written some articles that went in similar directions and also, it's right there in the title of this post, but I'm gonna spell it out once more anyway: Where are the actual Harvest Moon board games?

Some people have championed the idea that Agricola could be considered "a deeper Harvest Moon board game" (like locusshifter in this thread here), Mi Tierra: New Era even went one step further, adding a graphical design that's very reminiscent of Harvest Moon to the game, and on a superficial level, that might be reasonable. At first glance, all of these are about farming. But there's the problem, the Harvest Moon games really... aren't. Sure, there's farming in them. But while one can certainly find satisfaction in building a sprawling farm that yields a neat profit, the act of farming is usually just a means to an end. "But it's the same in Agricola", you might reasonably say. "Farming in this is just a means to the end of having a high VP-score." True. But while there was something like a "point tally" at the end of the original Harvest Moon (perhaps that was also present in other games in the series, I don't know, I have played quite a few of them over the years but I have to admit that I only finished the very first one), scoring high on this was never really the point. What happened on the way to that final scoring screen was.

I remember reading about the original Harvest Moon back in the day and it absolutely blew my ten year old mind. I knew RPGs back then and I also knew building-simulations and I liked both of those. But combining those two, creating an RPG where you weren't playing a murder hobo but a peace-loving guy who just wants to plant seeds, raise livestock, start a family, or - approaching this from the other side - giving a building-game a more personal touch by having the player "be" someone, creating an avatar who interacts with a colorful cast of characters you care about, that was absolutely... I don't know, consciousness-expanding? I got the game for Christmass that year (must have been 1997... I just read that the PAL-version was first released in January of 1998 but that wouldn't make a lot of sense), played the heck out of it and felt that it kept all of its promises. If I played it again today, I probably wouldn't be as enamoured with it as I was back then, it was really basic, the daily grind could become quite overwhelming later in the game, the controls were kind of cumbersome and the constraints (you could only take two tools with you and carry a single item at the same time) made the whole thing more inconvenient than it should have been. But it really nailed that "member of the community"-part. You weren't a murder hobo in this, because neither did you murder anything (save for the occasional cow or chicken by negligence), nor were you homeless. There's your farm, it's next to this charming little village, you won't escape the constraints of this very small game world over the course of the game but that's okay because there's always something to discover, something to do even in your own backyard. There's always a way to further the story of your very own character, a way to make your game special and unique (within the pretty firm constraints).

That's what I'm missing in the aforementioned farming-games. You're not shaping your own life-story, you're trying to build an efficient resource engine and make clever moves and stuff. There's no "That day I was walking in the woods and stumbled across the carpenter's daughter and gifted her a berry I had found a few minutes earlier" in Agricola because there's neither the possibility to have a stroll in the woods, nor a carpenter's daughter to be found there. It might be a clever, well designed game and all, but for all of its improvements and family expansion options, it's so very impersonal. Your farmers are just discs without names, faces, agendas, hopes and dreams. Your livestock are just resources that get put in their places and then stand there and sometimes multiply until they are traded in for something else or give you a few points at game end. That's a far cry from the cows in Harvest Moon that I named and brushed and that I cursed every time the weather changed, when I had to physically push them back into the stable. What I'm saying is that I love touches of personality in my board games, even in those that probably don't warrant that (as you might have noticed from me gushing over the stupid marriage-rule in Fortuna back in November), and the fact that there are those great, charming video games about farming with a real personal touch out there makes me lament that everything that could be called a "board game version of it" is so very impersonal.

Then again, it's hard to imagine how it could be any different. If one would try to adapt a Harvest Moon game into a board game framework, it would probably have to be closer to... I don't know, Arkham Horror or something like that than to Agricola. A farming-themed adventure game with random events and skill-checks for foraging and lumbering and stuff, with a gazillion ways to make points and loads of chance and stuff. Would that be good? I don't know, it'd be interesting, at the very least. I mean, I'm always up for game-concepts that don't rely on combat and violence. So a well-designed peaceful adventure game would be something I'd probably enjoy. Then again, to give you the feeling of really shaping a person's life, it would have to be pretty long and there'd probably be hardly any meaningful interaction between players. So a solo-game perhaps? A solo-legacy-game? Where each game represents a season and you'd have to tend to your farm but also explore the surrounding and get to know the townspeople and woo some ladies or gentlemen (depending on your preference)... That could be fun, I guess. So yeah, someone should absolutely make Agricola Legacy and sneak a lot of Harvest Moon elements into this one, I'd be very interested in that.

Apart from that, Harvest Moon: Hero of Leaf Valley is really good. I like the definitive goal (save the homeland that's threatened to be turned into a funpark), I like the layout of the game world, I like the upgrade-possibilities and how easy everything is in direct comparison to the original Harvest Moon... I don't know if I'll finish it, I certainly hope so but with these things, you'll never know. I'll try.

Oh, also, this is my 400th post. That's something, too, I guess!

Twitter Facebook
11 Comments
Tue Apr 16, 2019 7:00 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
12 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Monday Night Multiplayer Solitaire #23: Avenue

Christian Heckmann
Germany
Mainz
Rheinland Pfalz
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
From the minty fresh world of... I have no idea in which universe Mint Works is set, to the land of ripe grapes and color-coded castles. Today we're playing Avenue.



Two great things about today's game. First, even if you don't own a copy of Avenue, you can join in today, because all you need is a player-mat and the fine folks at Aporta Games made one available a few years ago for a similar event hosted by Rahdo (hence the branding on that downloadable PDF). You can find it here. Got that? Great! Second cool thing: You don't even have to constantly click on spoilers today, because I filmed myself playing today's challenge and therefore you can just use the video and play along. That is if you can a) cope with my irritating remarks and b) keep up with my playing-speed. I'm not the slowest player, hence the video clocks in at roughly ten minutes. If that's not enough time for you and/or you don't want to pause the thing after each card, the spoilerific version of this challenge is available to you below. But first, here's the video:



Okay, now for everybody who's still here: You know the drill, I present you with the circumstances and you just play the game according to them. I will provide you with two sets of spoilers, the first one contains the farms as they will be scored over the course of the game, the second one will be a list of the cards as they are drawn. The second list will be composed of exactly 40 spoilers, because that's the maximum length of a game (there are 20 grey cards in the game). The last ones might be empty, but you won't know until you play the game. Ready? Okay, here we go.

Farms:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
F

Spoiler (click to reveal)
B

Spoiler (click to reveal)
A

Spoiler (click to reveal)
E

Spoiler (click to reveal)
D


Road cards:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
4

Spoiler (click to reveal)
3 yellow

Spoiler (click to reveal)
6 yellow

Spoiler (click to reveal)
2 yellow

Spoiler (click to reveal)
4 yellow - END OF ROUND 1

Spoiler (click to reveal)
2 yellow

Spoiler (click to reveal)
6

Spoiler (click to reveal)
3 yellow

Spoiler (click to reveal)
3 yellow

Spoiler (click to reveal)
6 yellow - END OF ROUND 2

Spoiler (click to reveal)
3

Spoiler (click to reveal)
5 yellow

Spoiler (click to reveal)
5

Spoiler (click to reveal)
6 yellow

Spoiler (click to reveal)
5 yellow

Spoiler (click to reveal)
4

Spoiler (click to reveal)
5

Spoiler (click to reveal)
1 yellow - END OF ROUND 3

Spoiler (click to reveal)
5

Spoiler (click to reveal)
6

Spoiler (click to reveal)
2

Spoiler (click to reveal)
2 yellow

Spoiler (click to reveal)
3

Spoiler (click to reveal)
5 yellow

Spoiler (click to reveal)
6

Spoiler (click to reveal)
2

Spoiler (click to reveal)
4 yellow

Spoiler (click to reveal)
2

Spoiler (click to reveal)
4 yellow - END OF ROUND 4

Spoiler (click to reveal)
1

Spoiler (click to reveal)
2 yellow

Spoiler (click to reveal)
1 yellow

Spoiler (click to reveal)
3

Spoiler (click to reveal)
1 yellow

Spoiler (click to reveal)
4 yellow - END OF GAME

Spoiler (click to reveal)
GAME OVER

Spoiler (click to reveal)
GAME OVER

Spoiler (click to reveal)
GAME OVER

Spoiler (click to reveal)
GAME OVER

Spoiler (click to reveal)
GAME OVER


Final score:

Spoiler (click to reveal)


41 points


After-game discussion:

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Oh my. That was bad. I mean, that was really bad. Not the worst game of Avenue that I have ever played (in that one, I scored 11 points or so, if I remember correctly), but yeah, kind of terrible. Was it pressure to perform because the camera was rolling? I don't know. I thought that my tactic was kind of sound. Who could have guessed that all throughout that stupid fourth round, not a single 1 would show up? Had I only gotten one more of those, I would have scored significantly higher. I mean, it wasn't even an exceptionally short game, it could have lasted five more turns at most. So yeah, I'll blame it on bad luck. Then again, somebody will probably score far higher than me with ease, so... damn.


Next week's game is gonna be The Builders: Middle Ages. I'm looking forward to that one. Now, with all of the recent additions to the list of possible games, let's find out what to play the week after.

Poll
Which game should be played in two weeks' time on Monday Night Multiplayer Solitaire?
  Your Answer   Vote Percent Vote Count
Can't Stop Express
18.2% 2
Cucina Curiosa
9.1% 1
Dr. Eureka
18.2% 2
Dream Home
27.3% 3
Penny Papers Adventures: Skull Island
27.3% 3
Voters 11
This poll is now closed.   11 answers
Poll created by Harblnger
Closes: Today 6:00 am


Great, looking forward to next week, thank you for playing, reading, watching, thumbing and voting and see you soon.

Twitter Facebook
1 Comment
Mon Apr 15, 2019 7:00 pm
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
25 
 Thumb up
0.05
 tip
 Hide

Playing solo for the masses...

Christian Heckmann
Germany
Mainz
Rheinland Pfalz
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Can that be considered "ironic"? I'm not good at these things. Also, "masses" might not be entirely correct. I mean, when can a group of people be considered a "mass"? Anyway, what I'm trying to say is that I kind of liked trying out solo-modes for games (official ones as well as unofficial ones) in order to judge them based on their appropriateness for Monday Night Multiplayer Solitaire, so I've done it again. Here's six more games I tried out and what I think about them.



I kind of like Das allerbeste Baumhaus (that roughly translates to "The very best treehouse"). I'm not a big fan of drafting-games (as you might have noticed) but this one is quick and streamlined enough to be kind of enjoyable. Yeah, sure, the lovingly drawn artwork on the cards doesn't really matter, you're just building a pattern of matching colors and that's it, but... it's short. That doesn't sound like a lot of praise, does it? Anyway, the standalone-expansion Best Treehouse Ever: Forest of Fun introduced a solo-mode that is also playable with the cards from the original game and user knuckles29 helpfully provided a scan of those rules. "A solo-mode for a drafting game?", I hear you exclaim. "That sounds pretty pointless!" Well... it plays quite differently from the original version of the game. Sure, you still do the pattern-building-part, but the drafting is gone and so are the whole end-of-round-scoring-shenannigans with the double-card and the "doesn't score"-card and stuff. Each turn, you flip over two cards, choose one to add to your treehouse and one to discard. After five cards, you score points depending on which colors you have in your treehouse, multiplied by which cards you have discarded (up to a certain maximum). It's a very smooth system and I was impressed by how much fun the whole thing was. Yeah, sure, it can be quite lucky, but it's over after... dunno, five minutes or so, so I don't care about that that much.



The verdict: This one's good. Like... really good. It doesn't require a lot of maintenance, it's easy to record and reproduce, it's an interesting game in itself. I like it. So much that after trying it back to back twice, a short while later, I was like "Hey, let's try that again" and played two more games of it. My scores hover around 30 points or so which seems decent (although I'm not sure I'm playing the whole thing correctly, see here... hey, Green Couch Games, why don't you support your game adequately, huh?). So yeah, this one will be on the list soon.



I really don't know why people don't seem to like Master of Orion: The Board Game that much. Because it's not the grand 4X-space-epic they were expecting it to be? Well, I like it a lot and pretty much everybody I've played it with seemed to feel alike. The (mostly) solitairish nature of the game made it feel like it'd be ripe for a solo variant and lo and behold, user mangozine came up with something. And nobody cared. What's the matter with you people? If a new game comes out, one of the first questions that pops up on the boards seems to be "But does it play solo?" and then someone does actually come up with a solo-variant for a good game and nobody seems to give a damn. Anyway, I played it and it works pretty well. I changed a few things (made the "AI fleets" attack at the end of the round, not at the beginning) and it was... I don't want to say "a challenge", because at the end of the day, you're just aiming for a high score, but yeah, I was close to ending the game early due to a loss of morale on multiple occasions. But things worked out well and I ended the game with a whopping 58 points. That's actually pretty good if I remember all of the times I've played Master of Orion: The Board Game correctly. And it was fun, emulating the multiplayer-experience quite well.



The verdict: I don't see a reason why this shouldn't work. Sure, it'd be kind of cumbersome because I'd need to include the complete deck of cards into the challenge, but that's pretty much it. There'd be some random numbers each round plus the five advisors for setup, but all of that is manageable. So yeah, great stuff, we've got another more involved game that should be translatable into a MNMS-challenge without many problems, huzzah!



Aaaand another one where I thought to myself "So why wasn't this shipped with a solo variant to begin with?". Yeah, okay, there's the whole area-majority-part to Sentient as well, but the core of the game is that absorbing solitaire puzzle of finding out which card needs to be plugged into which slot. And that shouldn't be too hard to emulate. Turns out, other people thought so, too. Designer J. Alex Kevern proposed a "beat your own score"-variant in this thread. Some other users tweaked it a bit in order to turn it into a win/lose-affair. I played using rules cobbled together from some of the suggested variants in that same thread (placing assistants at the beginning of a turn, alternating turns with the AI-player's agents) and it was really fun. Also really hard. Using the rules sizzla proposed, I would have won by a single point on "easy mode" and lost horribly on "hard mode". Man, I really like this game.



The verdict: This one should work quite nicely as a game for MNMS. I think I'd use J. Alex Kevern's original "beat your own score"-variant that way, because as said, playing against an unpredictable AI is really hard, so if used in this... erm... "competitive" environment, just playing for a high score without having some die-rolls mess with you should be enough. But yeah, I can see it working out pretty well that way. I'm always thankful for an opportunity to play this gem of a game anyway.



I don't know if I'd say that Perry Rhodan: Die kosmische Hanse is a criminally underappreciated game, because it has a score of roughly 6.8 here on the Geek and I'd rate it a 7.5, but... yeah, people should talk about this one more. It's really quite something. I wasn't too sure about a solo-variant, though. It is technically a duelling-game after all, every point I can take away from you is one I get. Then again, it worked in 7 Wonders Duel, so it might work here as well. The solo variant is also "official" (as in not part of the original rules but thought out by the game's designer) so why not try it out? And I don't know why the first reaction by a user to the variant was "Here's some adjustments to make this more difficult", because I played two games back to back and the AI absolutely slaughtered me both times. Well, I had a shot at winning the second time (I just needed to roll anything but a two during the last turn... guess what came up) but the first one was absolutely ridiculous. Sure, by the end of the game, you have so much technology and so many options that you can catch up to the AI, but especially early on, that thing just makes money left and right. I kind of liked it, though. It definitely is a formidable challenge.



The verdict: I don't think it'd make a very good game for MNMS, though. At first, I thought that it might work well. But the more I thought about it, the more "problems" I noticed. It "suffers" (well, in the context of the challenges I present to you) from the win/lose-outcome. Either you beat the AI or you don't. So scoring a game would be problematic. Also the double-sided nature of the goods-cards is a problem. It'd be hard to track which ones you took at this very moment and then find out what's on the backs when you flip them after transporting 'em to their destination. All of that would be just inconvenient. And then there's that one intervention card that lets you shuffle all of your cards and your discard pile back into your draw deck and at that point, I'd have to go "Well, everything else is obsolete, you just continue playing your game from now on". So yeah, while I like the game and also enjoyed the solo-version, I don't think that it would work very well in the context of Monday Night Multiplayer Solitaire. Shame.



You wouldn't have expected to see this one on this list, did you? Dice Town is a fun little party game, enjoyable while it lasts but not much more than that. I was quite surprised to find out that someone had thought about creating a solo variant for this one, because it's not one that'd immediately come to mind when you think about games that are so fun that you'd love to experience them on your own, is it? Ah well, here we are, user asutbone has thought up a solo variant, might as well give it a go. And it does actually work. I mean, the AI-player is as dumb as a bucket of shrimp, but his inborn advantages kind of make up for it. But even admitting that, it's not especially interesting. The thing is, it only simulates a two-player-game and that's hardly the perfect way to play Dice Town. Sure, you could use multiple dummy-players but at that point, the cost probably exceeds the benefit. I mean, is Dice Town's central gameplay really that enjoyable to you? Is outsmarting a bunch of pretty stupid AIs what you want to get out of this game? Didn't think so either.



The verdict: Could work, I suppose. It'd be a bit inconvenient to post and stuff, but it would be playable, I guess. But then again, it's not interesting enough to warrant that. Don't get me wrong, Dice Town is a fine game, but it is also a highly social one (to me at least) and stripping it of that angle, there's not enough left to be of interest. Good work on the variant, as said, it works really well. But for some games, that just isn't enough.



And finally, another official solo variant. In a game you didn't know I owned. Yeah, not much has come in lately, so I didn't bother with another "New to the shelf"-post yet, but I recently got a hold of Bad Bones, one of the games I was looking forward to this year. It looked like a lot of fun. Quick and easy to play, very streamlined, pretty, accomodating a wide range of players... what's not to like? It also looked like it'd work very well in a solitaire-environment and therefore would make for a good MNMS-game. And... I think it does. I'm not sure yet. I played two and a half games using the advanced rules back to back and I have to say, playing this one solo is friggin' hard. With only a single house and a single level of your tower, you've got the odds pretty much stacked against you. I'm pretty sure that this is a game you can get better at. The rules seem to be easy to grasp and the movement of the skelettons shouldn't be too much of a problem to anybody, but it'll probably take a while to recognize advantageous patterns (and moves). I personally found it a bit stressful at first but quickly grew into it and now I'm kind of pumped to try it out against actual opponents. I'm pretty sure it's gonna be a blast that way.



The verdict: As for MNMS-suitability... I'm not sure. With the solo-rules as written, it doesn't make a whole lot of sense. As said, it's pretty challenging and there isn't really a way to score your session, except for checking how long you survived or how many skeletons were left at game end... It could probably be adapted, though. Perhaps just combine the regular multiplayer-rules with those for solo-play, use the normal setup with four tower-levels and five houses and then play for ten turns and at the end, tally up points. That could work. I'll have to mull that one over, but you might see it as a possible choice for a game on MNMS in the future. Maybe. I don't know yet.

Twitter Facebook
1 Comment
Sun Apr 14, 2019 7:00 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
20 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

The comfort of familiarity

Christian Heckmann
Germany
Mainz
Rheinland Pfalz
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
At the moment, I'm watching the third season of The Expanse and the second half of the third season of Into The Badlands concurrently. Both are TV shows that I do actually liked in their previous seasons but... not excessively so. Into The Badlands feels like an americanized adaptation of a manga authored by someone who has watched too much Mad Max and Game Of Thrones but is easily bored if there isn't a huge action-sequence every ten minutes, while The Expanse tries so very hard to be a mixture between gritty, political drama and sweeping space opera but is just too shallow for both of those things (and I don't care what some people are saying, some of the CGI-work is just absolutely hideous). They are both entertaining shows, sure, but hardly anything more than that.
But I find myself really enjoying their respective third seasons. Not because they have gotten better. Their quality is pretty much the same as before. But... it had been a while since I had seen the previous seasons (about a year for Into The Badlands and half a year for The Expanse) and it just felt kind of good, comfortable to be back. It was pretty much the same with the third season of Preacher. I don't really like Jesse Custer as a character in that one (while Cassidy is the absolute shit), but just seeing him again after "all this time" (it really hasn't been that long) was nice, no matter how I felt about him beforehand. It happens in movies. It happens in video games. It happens in board games. Slipping back into something that you liked, going "I really dig that sense of familiarity".

I don't know how often I've used a phrase that basically says "I had almost forgotten how good that game was before playing it again", I certainly feel like I express that emotion pretty often. Because while playing new games, discovering new stuff is all fine and dandy, there's something comforting about just playing something that you already know, something that isn't that surprising, something that just feels familiar. It happened to me a few times lately, sometimes with games I knew were really good, sometimes with ones where that cozy feeling of diving back into them just added to my overall enjoyment, even though I wasn't sure how much I'd like them beforehand. There was that one game of Scythe I talked about two months ago, where everybody was initimately familiar with the game and we didn't even need a mere rules-refresher, where we could just put that game on the table and jump right into it. That was mighty fine. Played some games of Cthulhu Wars lately that were like this. I talked about Islebound yesterday and how much fun it was to bring that game back to the table after all this time. The resurgence of Die blutige Herberge last year felt like that to me. Or take perhaps my recent play of Blueprints after three years of not-having-played-it. Where I was quite delighted by the game because of that sense of... I don't know, "homecoming"? The return to something I liked okay once upon a time, finding out that I liked it more now.

Is that the great underlying concept of "games getting better"? Where people play it for the first time and go "Yeah, that's okay", and then they play it again and again and suddenly, it's among their favorite games of all time? Is that because of a growing sense of familiarity and therefore a more positive response when you return to it? I don't know, I of course admit that there's the absolute opposite to that, where you haven't played something in a long time and then return to it and notice that it hasn't aged well or that your intermediate experiences have changed you in such a way that that game isn't something you like any more. But perhaps that's just the more impressive pecularity of this... "phenomenon"? You know, psychologists say that stronger emotional responses leave a more lasting impact. That's why you get the feeling that you're always stuck in the slowest queue at the checkout, because all those times that this happened to you elicit a stronger emotional response than the ones where everything went fine. Annoyance seems to be a stronger emotion than a pleasant surprise, so we remember the times where a formerly beloved game disappointed us more than the ones, where a game started to slowly grow on us.

Or perhaps that's just tinpot-psychology and I have no idea what I'm talking about. But I do know that the aforementioned instances, where I went back into something that I liked but not that much after some time, these feelings of comming full-circle in some regard, have been strangely soothing. So who knows? Perhaps I should give Taboo another watch. Then again, perhaps not.

Twitter Facebook
0 Comments
Sat Apr 13, 2019 7:00 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
27 
 Thumb up
0.25
 tip
 Hide

Spacebound

Christian Heckmann
Germany
Mainz
Rheinland Pfalz
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Okay, back to board games. I've played some lately. Not as many as you'd think I'd play, but... well, some. And all of them previously known to me. Here they are:



On Monday, Dumon was free on short notice. I should have probably used the time to study some more but my brain was already fried enough at that point, so I jumped at the chance to do anything but read even more stuff about computer graphics (and as said yesterday, I got a passing grade, so I didn't do anything wrong, I guess). I quickly called on another player and so the three of us played another game of Empires of the Void II. As said way back when I played my first game of this: I really wanted to try it again soon and do better. Well, I think I did. At the end of the day, Dumon won by a single point (and only because during my last turn, I was too obsessed with doing one action while another action would have given me the one point I needed to catch up and I would have won via tie-breaker), but I feel like I was pretty efficient throughout the game. Sure, there were some moments when I had to take sub-optimal moves or didn't really know what to do with my personal choice of action, but yeah, most of the time, I did pretty well. Even though the scoring-card came up at the most suboptimal point, costing me quite a few points. Then again, the other two players were like "Oh no, not now, I just needed one more turn!" as well, so I think it evened out.



Empires of the Void II is really cool, I think. It's a bit fiddly, the setup takes a while, I really need to print out some more helpful player-aids because the ones provided with the game are cumbersome to use and at the end of the day, playing tactically and doing a bit of everything is probably more important than having a strict over-arching strategy, but the moment to moment gameplay is just so darn fun. It's one of those games where you get something neat or can do something cool pretty much every turn, where roaming the galaxy, meeting interesting people and killing them is a joy. Plus the hand-management-aspect is really strong and I tend to like games that rely on that mechanism. Dumon was quite impressed with the game as well, something that doesn't seem to happen all that often. So yeah, this is a really good one, folks. Had I played it last year, it would have easily taken a place in my "best games of the year"-list, perhaps even in my general Top 50. At which rank, you ask? Don't know yet, have to play it more often. WANT to play it more often! And that's a very good sign.



So afterwards, we decided to play another quick game of Automobiles, not using the starting-configuration this time but settling for the "Rainbow Road Warrior"-set instead. We started out pretty slow, not making much progress on the racing-track, sometimes crawling along in a conga line, sometimes outright stopping dead because we had maneuvred ourselves into really stupid positions. That is until I used the rotary engine for the first time. And at that point, I had all ten different colors in my discard pile. Which means that I was able to move ten white spaces. Sure, it were only white spaces, but moving ten of those with a single cube was stupidly efficient. I pulled off that little trick once more later in the game and won by a mile, lapping the bottom of the pile in the process. That was weird.



I already voiced my concerns that the blue cubes might be a bit too strong. Sure, they are very situational but if luck's on your side and you manage to use them to their fullest effect, it's gonna be pretty hard for anyone to stop you. Is that bad? I don't know. The game is quick and light and fun enough to be enjoyable even if blue cubes seem overpowered. Also I only played the game twice, so I'm hardly an expert on balance or stuff like that. I like it. Drawing cubes from your bag, planning your turn, doing clever moves is really cool. It is a bit limited, sure, but then again, it's a racing game, what did you expect? And as far as racing-games go, for now, this is one of the few ones that manages to capture the spirit and has the mechanics to boot. This is a good one.



On Wednesday, while D. and N. were present and we were waiting for our fourth player S. to arrive, D. seemed smitten with the concept of "Basically a worker placement game but your worker is a ship", so we played a game of Islebound. Now, last year, I proclaimed that the great Rise of the Necromancers would do everything that Islebound does but just a bit better, so I didn't know whether I still needed Islebound in my collection, even though I like the game quite a bit. But in truth, I hadn't played Islebound ever since I had gotten my hands on Rise of the Necromancers. So before I did finally get rid of the game, I thought that I should perhaps try it again and find out whether I had been mistaken. And... well... Islebound has so much going for it. It's absolutely beautiful, it's fun, it's clever, it's pretty streamlined... it just plays very well. But at the end of the day... *sigh* Yeah, Rise of the Necromancers is the better game and close enough to it that I probably don't need both. Which is a shame, because as said, Islebound IS very good. Alas, shelf-space and table-time is limited and I'd probably always choose Rise of the Necromancers when it came down to it.



Your mileage may vary, though. Islebound has a nicer theme and is prettier, that's for sure. D. afterwards said that he liked the friendlier, more approachable feel of Islebound probably better and I can't argue with that. I like it a lot, too, it is just a nice, enjoyable game with loads of stuff going for it. Our game was also pretty close, I pulled ahead early on, grabbing the sea serpent Ichor as soon as possible (because that's very cool), conquering ports, amassing a crew of sailors that helped me zip arround the map... But at the end of the day, I just came in second. Final scores were 112:107:97. I probably could have been more efficient. After all, the game is a neat puzzle of logistical efficiency, which is something I am a sucker for (and like to think I am kind of good at). Ah well, really good game, it's a bit sad to let it go, but... yeah, if you're interested in it, drop me a message.



So when S. had arrived, we decided to play my favorite game of 2017 (why is it classified as a 2018-release here on the Geek if the versions-tab of its page explicitly says "Release Date: Nov 2017"?), Lords of Hellas. Still without any expansions, they haven't arrived yet (even though I heard that they are quite close), but this was only my sixth game of this, so I really don't need expansions just yet, there's enough in this box to be enjoyable yet. And yeah, a rollicking good time was had by all. I played Perseus, usurping Phocis and building the Oracle of Delphi early on, before I got hit pretty hard by two monsters (the Sphinx and the Alien) simultaneously. I didn't really manage to recover from that, the two blessing-drafts left me with blessings that allowed me to destroy opposing hoplites using combat cards and I tried to use those to stop S. from simply winning the game via area-control but once I had opened myself that way, D. just waltzed right into my territories, even though I told him that he needed to stop S. as well, because I couldn't do it without any help. He thought I was bluffing. I wasn't. S. just won the game on the next turn. Which was fine, really. I mean, it's those moments that make games like this enjoyable, isn't it?



Pro-tip, don't start in the middle of the map. I did and I was pretty much separating all of the other players from each other, so I would have either have to allow them to go through me in order to get into each others' faces, or it would have been my responsibility to pummel those pulling ahead back into line. And I wasn't really prepared to do that. So yeah, at the end of the day, it was probably my fault for greedily grabbing the Oracle early on. But building it allowed me to raise two of my hero's stats by one, that was too good to pass up on. I really like Lords of Hellas. It's so quick and easy to play, it looks absolutely fantastic on the table, the combat is neat, the different winning-conditions are as well, it's just a really good game altogether and I'm looking forward to the expansions very much.

Twitter Facebook
10 Comments
Fri Apr 12, 2019 7:00 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls
Recommend
17 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide

Taking a day off

Christian Heckmann
Germany
Mainz
Rheinland Pfalz
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
The time has come. I'm gonna take a day off today. Because I need it. After providing you with daily posts all throughout my kind of stressful exam-period, yesterday, I aced my oral examination in computer graphics. And by "aced", I mean I barely scraped by with a 3.3 (that's a C- in the US letter grade system). I had studied quite a bit for the whole stuff, was kind of well-versed in more complex concepts like OBBs, SAT-tests, bounding box hierarchies, shape matching, position based dynamics and the likes. But when it came to the exam, I immediately fumbled the theorem of intersecting lines and then just barely limped across the finish line by remembering that in order to check for a colission of two bounding boxes via vertices, you have to calculate the cross product of all of the edges of the bounding boxes. You know... fun stuff.

Anyway, with that in the bag, I've almost reached the end of my university-career. Now I only need to complete another seminar in operating systems and write my bachelor's thesis on the topic of solving the vertex cover problem. You know, even more fun stuff. But once that's through (in probably three to four months), I'll have finally acquired my bachelor's degree at the tender age of 32. Yey me.

So yeah, nothing today, except for this little piece of information. Well... posts without pictures are boring. So here's another heartwarming tweet by the retrievans-guys.



See you tomorrow.

Twitter Facebook
2 Comments
Thu Apr 11, 2019 7:00 am
Post Rolls
  • [+] Dice rolls

1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5  Next »  [41]

Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.