Gaming for a living

When one designs and published board games for a living, one tends to rant a lot about it. This is where we do that, the folks involved with NSKN Games and our special friends and supporters. We'll post here our ideas about gaming, about life, about gaming more often than not, about the specific challenges of making a business out of a hobby and... did we mention games?

Archive for Błażej Kubacki

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Ready for UK Games Expo!

B. G. Kubacki
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As it has been a tradition for NSKN Games for the last six years, we are once again coming to UK Games Expo, where you'll be able to find us in hall 1, booth K-2. Here's some of the cool stuff we have to show you.

Let's start with some big games, shall we?



Firstly, there is Teotihuacan! The game by Daniele Tascini (the designer of Tzolk'in) is now in production, but we have an in-house prototype, which you will be able to see, touch, and - most importantly - play!



Secondly, Dávid Turczi's Dice Settlers! Our newest Kickstarter is being manufactured as we speak, and we will also have it available to try out. So, if you're a fan of light 4X and rolling loads of custom dice, definitely come by!



If you're curious about the newest entry in the Aestemyr (also known as the Mistfall universe), we will have an early production copy of Chronicles of Frost (by Yours Truly) for you to try out.



Finally, we will also be showing and selling Dragonsgate College - a game of dice drafting, where you're in charge of training wizards, warriors and rogues in a school of magic and mystery, from the designers of Yedo.

The above should satisfy the true heavy gamer, but we also have some great stuff for more family oriented among you:



Have you played Scare It!, our incredibly versatile game of scaring house pets (and elephants)? 15-minute gameplay, 1-8 players, different modes of play, and some amazing art, which has been a staple of Strawberry Studio for some time now.

If you're interested by upcoming titles from Strawberry Studio, you will also be able to try out Little Monster that Came for Lunch and Stayed for Tea, a new game of monstrously good fun from Robin Lees and Steve Mackenzie, as well as Bon Appetit! - a bidding game for the finest meals on the planet.

Okay, that is a lot of games, and we will be demoing them at different times of each of UKGE's three days. If you're there, come by booth K-2 in hall 1, we'll be happy to say hello, and have you seated for a cool gaming experience.

We're hoping to see you there!
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Wed May 30, 2018 11:13 am
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In all seriousness

B. G. Kubacki
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If you’re reading this, chances are that table top gaming is one of your favourite pastimes, and that you are what society considers an adult. It’s also quite possible that at least once in your gaming life you caught a funny stare when you admitted to spending your personal time over what many consider a toy.

This is by far not the first time the way “regular people” look at gamers is explored. Dig long enough here on the Geek, and you’ll probably come up with stories of people forced to explain that they don’t wear elf ears to gaming nights (not that there’s anything wrong with wearing elf ears), or that a responsible adult would not consider game a worthy pastime unless they could make a few bucks winning. Still, most of those stories would be kind of old.

Gaming and “general geekery” is in a different place than it was five to eight years ago. Board games seem more widely recognized as an actual idea for a fun evening, as opposed to be the straw desperate parents clutch on a hopelessly rainy Sunday afternoon to somehow manage potentially destructive, boredom-induced tendencies of their offspring. Our non-gaming friends usually know what we do in our free time, and we’re not considered as weird as we were back in the day. Society, it seems, has accepted us as its fully functional members.

I bet that after reading the above paragraph, there is somebody there thinking about proving me wrong. Honestly, I would not be surprised. From what I see here in Poland, even though designer board games are available in chain bookstores and supermarkets, there are still people thinking that each of them is based on the idea of rolling a die and moving a pawn that many spaces, and – as a consequence – games are “only” toys.

So, perhaps something else has changed? Perhaps the fact that being a geek is no longer truly an insult, we ourselves are mellower when it comes to dealing with people who know all about our hobby having played only Monopoly, than we used to?

Finally I’m able to arrive at what I wanted to ask all along, but needed a few paragraphs to set the stage: does it really matter to you, how your pastime is perceived? Do you feel the need to prove that gaming is something people can treat seriously, as seriously as they treat more “adult” pastimes? If so, do you feel that your experience is somewhat lessened by other people looking down at the fun you have?
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Wed May 23, 2018 3:53 pm
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When "no" feels like a dirty word

B. G. Kubacki
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Kickstarter is about creating what otherwise would probably not exist at all – with the help of backers. For a creator, it’s about coming up with a creative idea, presenting it to a group of enthusiasts, and making it a reality. For the backer, at least until the promised game is delivered, it’s about participation.

Over the last few years, I’ve written a few “Why back now?” sections for a few of the NSKN Games Kickstarters, as well as for a handful of campaigns we helped to create. One of the reasons that would always make an appearance was: “to make the game better for everyone”.

I don’t think I was the first to come up with the “better for everyone” idea, but I am certain that I had used it, before I bumped into it on other Kickstarters. I believe it’s an idea many people came up with independently, and it does not surprise me one bit. After all, it’s not only a good thing to say, it’s also something that is generally true.

Unless it’s not.

As backers, all of us love to participate in the game expanded and grown before our very eyes, and as we speak our mind, we get to be part of a creative process. As creators, we have an opportunity to use the suggestions of people already in love with the game to make it even better. An opportunity we sometimes have to ignore.

Backers often don’t react too well to being told that the thing they want is not going to happen. With multiple interesting projects running on Kickstarter almost any given day now, it’s also easy to see how those unhappy with the answer they got pull their pledge and take their business elsewhere. Hard as it may be, sometimes the only right option a creator has is sticking to their guns.

Responsibility is the key here, for when a project has a few hundred backers (and we all know that a couple of hundred backers make for but a small Kickstarter), a creator of a mid-sized campaign will usually communicate with perhaps a few dozen backers on any given day. It’s easy to forget that there are hundreds (if not thousands) others, who are slower or less eager to communicate.

Listening to a fan base in the making is incredibly important. Interacting with backers makes the creator form a bit of a bond with people who are helping to bring their project to life. Saying no to people who genuinely want to make the game better for everyone can thus seem like saying something inappropriate. Nonetheless, it’s something that sometimes it has to be done, no matter how dirty it feels.
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Fri May 11, 2018 3:24 pm
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Kickstarter’s problem with time

B. G. Kubacki
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As a company, we pride ourselves on delivering our Kickstarters on time. It’s not that we’re never late, sometimes even the best laid plans end up one contingency short of a perfect ending, but the few times we’ve slipped (out of a dozen or so projects), the delays were rather small – and we worked hard to minimize them.

For most creators, however, delays happen due to bad planning. Optimistically assuming that every step of brining a game from a prototype to a product is the mistake made most often – and one grievous enough to ensure that no amount of extra work will help minimize delays that keep on piling up.

The truth is that, as backers, we’ve come to almost expect Kickstarter projects to be late. After all, Kickstarting a game often changes it enough to force the creator into devoting extra time for unexpected design and development – and that is something very difficult to properly schedule for. Still there is a bigger problem that makes backers wait for most of the games: their own expectations, and how creators deal with them.

As I said, we almost expect Kickstarter games to be late, and while creators do not account for delays, many backers often do. Simply put, when you see a waiting period of six months, you often immediately assume you’ll probably have to in fact wait for eight to nine months, because – hey! – delays are a part of Kickstarter.

It is a kind of a vicious circle. Many creators now are able to accurately assess the time they will need to fulfil a Kickstarter project, but putting a realistic timeline requires actually telling the backers that it is realistic. In the highly competitive crowdfunding landscape of today, games you’ll have to wait for longer than for others – similar in scope, complexity and component lists – can easily earn a pass by a prospective backer internally accounting for inevitable delays.

It’s a global problem that is hard to fix. After all, Kickstarter is the place where amateurs get their shot at becoming pros, and some mistakes are bound to happen. Still, urging other creators to build realistic timelines is something we do when lending a hand or providing consulting.

Building better communication is important for all Kickstarter creators. Hopefully, with more projects delivering on time, the circle can be broken for good, allowing backers to expect their pledges to arrive on time(or a late by no more than a few weeks) – and not having to mentally adjust for obligatory delays.
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Fri May 4, 2018 4:49 pm
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No Country for Small Creators. Really?

B. G. Kubacki
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Last week I talked about Kickstarter exclusive games – including those which are so difficult to find outside of Kickstarter that are widely considered exclusive – and hinted on another topic I’d like to touch on in a separate post. The topic was board gaming Kickstarter today, and companies using it to crowdfund their games.

Board games were certainly not a big part of Kickstarter about ten years ago. Now tabletop gaming is kind of huge. Some of the biggest projects on Kickstarter – which means biggest crowdfunding projects in the world – are board games.

Large companies making Kickstarter exclusive games becoming a thing re-sparked a certain side-topic of many discussions: is Kickstarter still what it used to be, and do small publishers and creators still stand a chance against large companies competing for backers’ attention – and having the resources to steal it?

Well, Kickstarter is not exactly what it was ten years ago, and that’s actually great! If it stood in one place, our hobby – and our industry – would not be growing. More and more games are pitched, funded and delivered to backers’ doors, and that indeed means that competition might be fierce, but it is as it should be.

In fact, it is not only a natural course of events, it’s also highly beneficial to backers. A creator or small company who has already managed to successfully deliver a quality product is automatically more trustworthy of future pledges, and with the bar raised by competition, scammers (or creators who are simply incompetent) are much easier to spot.

As I said in my previous post, Kickstarter exists to allow products (games) that would otherwise never exist to become a reality, and it still serves that function for pretty much anyone who is willing to give it a fair try. It is only by comparison with the most funded projects that smaller and less established creators seem to suffer, as they are usually far from today’s highest funding levels.

Still, while analysing the situation, it’s worth to research funding levels of games that were considered smash hits back in the day (around 2010 to be exact). Alien Frontiers, the first big hit made with Kickstarter made a whopping $14 885 – a funding level now easily beaten by Kickstarter first timers.

Apart from the odd lightning in a bottle, a creator nowadays has to do pretty much the same thing anyone has to do to be successful: work hard, be ready to invest (some money and probably a lot of time), possibly receive a bit of help from their friends, and have a bit of luck. With that much – and a reasonable idea for a game – Kickstarter will still make you a published game designer and/or a publisher.

And by “Kickstarter” I mean backers – gamers and dreamers, truly passionate about their hobby, and interested in being a part of the creative process of making a game – people whose numbers were never as high as they are today.
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Fri Apr 27, 2018 4:26 pm
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Holy Exclusivity, Batman!

B. G. Kubacki
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Totally new developments on Kickstarter seem in short supply these days. Apart from an odd project that ends up with a pile of money nobody had expected it to raise, few things make everybody discuss a single game. One of them is still the idea of a Kickstarter exclusive game.

You probably know how we feel about Kickstarter exclusive content for a game that otherwise normally hits your FLGS shelves: we don't like it, and we don't really do it. There’s little that seems to have the power to turn people away from a game so effectively as the knowledge of paying for something that’s been essentially flayed: deprived of some key gameplay features, which you will never be able to get your hands on.

However, a game that is Kickstarter exclusive is a whole different story, and following the discussion that blew up with the launch of Monolith’s Batman, I felt deeply puzzled on more than one occasion. I don’t want to make anyone’s opinion seem irrelevant, but I do want to contest at least some of things I’ve read.

The Kickstarter exclusive game probably (but kind of unofficially) started from Gloomhaven. While you could get the game in some stores, during the second Kickstarter it was rather obvious that most of the copies will be sold and bought as part of the project. Stores were given the opportunity to pledge, but everybody knows that when those wells run dry, new copies won’t be available, unless via another Kickstarter campaign.

Still, the discussion really erupted not with Gloomhaven but with CMON’s Hate: a game that was advertised as something you’ll be able to get your hands on only with Kickstarter, only to intensify when Monolith announced the KS only Batman: Gotham City Chronicles, and then was kept alive as the game went live all through to the time when it closed on a formidable 3.5 million dollars, with much more to come in the pledge manager. Now that the dust has settled, the whole thing warrants another look.

It’s obvious that a Kickstarter exclusive game is paradise for all who like to make a few extra bucks and selling off their pledges after the game is fulfilled, but it’s not what was levelled most heavily against Hate and Batman. It was something much more perplexing: that a game which cannot hold its own on store shelves, should not be Kickstarted at all. Especially a game as lavish and expensive as Batman.

Here’s where I’m a bit lost. Kickstarter has always been a place to go with a great idea, a bit of money, and a lot of hard work to make one’s dream a reality. Creators could transform an idea that was otherwise either impossible or extremely difficult to realize into actual product. That is how the legendary Alien Frontiers came into being all those years ago. That is how many games are still being made.

A product deemed unworthy of attention, too risky or too niche always had a chance to go from an idea to reality thanks to crowdfunding in general, and with a game like Batman – one which aims to provide a lot of content wrapped around a very expensive property – the whole endeavour does not seem very far away from the idea of bringing to life something that could not exist otherwise. The only difference is that it does not start small, does not come from an underdog, and does not suprise everybody with its success.

Finally, there is yet another matter which reared its head while discussing the huge Kickstarter exclusive games, and that is the one of making crowdfunding less accessible to smaller creators with less resources. And that, well, that is a topic for a whole new post.
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Fri Apr 20, 2018 10:44 am
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Chronicles of Frost Designer Diaries: The Discovery

B. G. Kubacki
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One of the most exciting things about adventure games is exploration. One of the most annoying things is the randomness. You can’t really have one without the other, but you can still have a damn good game running right through the middle.



From the first time I played the prototype I knew that Chronicles of Frost would be a game that plays fast. I also knew that its nature would require me to condense some of the fun adventure genre staples in a way that would not destabilize the whole construct.

Exploration in games is always a difficult thing to do right. Give randomness complete rule over discovering new regions, pieces of the star map or encounters, and you wrest the reins away from the players. Reduce randomness too much, and you’re running a risk of annihilating the magic of discovery from the game.

Right from the start I knew I wanted the world to grow as the game unfolds. The first solution was simple: exit your current location into the unknown, draw a new location from the deck, and place it on the table. As you can imagine, with different location abilities this was a very swingy mechanism – and one that I eventually left in the game, but only as one of two rather different options.



The new option was literally born mid-game: how about I let the players choose one out of a few locations whenever they explore? After all, the Mists have made their world unstable, and reaching a specific destination (on time or at all) is never a certainty. You can still just wander off into the unknown, and see where fate takes you, but you can also put a little bit of effort into trying to look before you leap into what lies ahead.

In a blink of an eye an already aptly named “scout” symbol became one that would allow you to not only draw from your own deck, but also from the deck of locations, in order to choose what specific place will land right next to your hero. And to spice things up, to make exploration even more exciting, I decided to add one more thing to each location: a discovery effect.

Simply put, the discovery effect is a one-time bonus which you receive when you place a new location. You get to draw a card, you get some extra Resolve (that allows you to buy more cards), you get to heal a little – you get a small but useful effect designed to reward you for being an explorer. None of these effects will turn your game completely around, but resolving the right one at the right time can be most useful.




What about people who want a faster and more risky approach? Well, you can still just ignore the more ponderous exploration in favour of just going blindly into the wilds. You still get the benefit of discovering a new location but you have little control over what it actually is, as you simply topdeck a location into the play area.

Since one of the driving mechanisms of Chronicles of Frost is a quest system that requires players to find either specific types of locations, or their inhabitants, scouting is important, but you can still come up on top if you choose mobility and resilience over preceding research.

And the best thing? The way exploration works in Chronicles now makes it possible to approach expanding the map either truly strategically, or more deliberately, and it’s only up to you how you will learn the current shape of the lands of Valskyrr each time you sit down to play.
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Mon Nov 6, 2017 1:14 pm
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Chronicles of Frost Designer Diaries: The Myth

B. G. Kubacki
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Last time I told you about Chronicles of Frost, I mentioned two important features of a hero: the heroic skill we look up to, and the determination we relate to. There is however one more important element without which a mythical hero would simply not be: the myth itself.



Great games are rarely invented overnight. Chronicles of Frost came to life in a matter of hours, but it would only be its earliest life. The next few weeks from December 2016 to late January 2017 were a time of making and remaking prototypes, playing different versions and thinking if the game will end up actually presented to somebody, or in the bin.
Okay, the last part was never true. I knew from the moment I heard Chronicles’ heartbeat that it was something worth working on until it was ready to be published. And it would be ready.

When the concept of Chronicles of Frost materialized in my mind, it came with some more or less basic ideas: cards you’d build your deck with would mostly be discarded after use, apart from a few rarer ones that would linger in your player area. The board would be built as you play, the players pushed to expand it by the quests each hero starts the game with (you’ll get to know more about this later). There was still one thing missing from the deck-building aspect.

Third or fourth prototype of the game was already working really fine, when suddenly I got hit by the idea that would make it all complete: the junkyard where removed cards, completed quests and destroyed enemies would end up in. The junkyard which would not be a junkyard at all, but an integral element to the game mechanisms – and to its theme as well.

And so the Chronicle was born – inspired by both the pursuit to create a more complete gaming experience, and by the title of the game itself. Believe it or not, that is the order those elements materialized in the design process: first there was a title, then there was the mechanism that would become a part of the game itself.

Part of what the Chronicle is in fact a formality: finished quests and felled foes would work equally well without a named area to keep them in. Part would be something more, as removed cards which usually go to a bland afterlife of “removed from the game”, “returned to the box”, or simply “trashed”, would now become a source of points – and an account of the journey itself.

So, what is the Chronicle? It’s a pile of cards and tokens, with some of the cards (the ones you start the game with, and the ones you acquire as you play) becoming worth more victory points as they are purged from the deck.

I know full well that this is not a never-before-seen mechanism. It appeared in other deckbuilding games, and it makes its appearance in Chronicles of Frost, creating a layer of extra gains from simply removing cards from one’s deck – and a small thematic push, as players get to build not only their game, but also its later accounts.

With the Chronicle, the true basis was there, and the game revealed itself to me in its fullness, making me – the designer – finally find out what it was about in its purest essence. And that is what I will discuss the next time, together with one more thing: how Chronicles of Frost compare to Shadowscape – especially for those of you who love (or hate!) my previous venture into Aestemyr – the world of Mistfall.
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Fri Nov 3, 2017 8:47 pm
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Chronicles of Frost Designer Diaries: The Heart

B. G. Kubacki
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Chronicles of Frost came to be within weeks. It’s been almost half a year since – that’s six months used to polish the game, to show it to different groups, to send out rough prototypes for blind testing that is happening as I write these words. Yet, it all begun with one idea.



If you know my games, you probably know a bit of what to expect from my designs. “If it’s your game, it’s going to have combos” is something I’ve heard on more than one occasion, after I gave a new person an overview of what Chronicles of Frost features in terms of mechanisms and gameplay. Sure enough, my newest game does feature them. It also has deckbuilding, and movement on a map that is being crafted during the game by players.

Deckbuilding is the basis of the game. You play a hero with a custom deck of cards. You purchase new ones, you remove some of the ones you start the game with. You build a relatively thin deck, because you are racing against others to reach your goals. You solve the world puzzle, once again jumbled by the Mists, trying to make it adhere to your needs more than to the needs of others. And as with any “boardified” fantasy epic, you are questing and facing monsters.

You do all this, but most importantly, you bleed.

As I drew the first few iterations of a single Chronicles card, each of them had one thing in common: it was in fact divided into two cards. The initial idea was to make players choose just one of the two every time they play a card. Then, within a few hours, the idea evolved.

Stories of heroes share two things that seem the most fascinating: one of them is their incredible skills, the other is determination. When we read The Odyssey, we are fascinated by Ulysses’ ingenuity, but we are also gripped by his determination to come back to his wife and son. The skill is something we can look up to, but the determination in the face of trials is something we can relate to.

The card that didn’t end up crumpled in the bin was the one that came divided horizontally through the middle. The one that gave the hero two effects to resolve: the top one activated simply for playing the card, and the bottom one unlocked with a skill token (which are in an ever short supply) – or by one or more wounds.

Wounds placed voluntarily, just to achieve more, to fell a mighty foe, to go further into the unknown. Wounds spawned by heroic exertion and determination.

The moment I drew an ugly wound symbol (I could not draw my way out of a paper bag), right next to the even uglier skill symbol, I could feel the first, slow, deliberate thump somewhere in the back of my mind. And as I started pondering the decisions, the options, and – most importantly – the feel of Chronicles of Frost, I could feel my own excitement, at one incredible realization:

My game now had a beating heart.
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Tue Oct 31, 2017 12:01 pm
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Chronicles of Frost Designer Diaries: The Beginning

B. G. Kubacki
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If you’ve been following NSKN Games on Facebook, you might have noticed a certain announcement we’ve made recently: we are once again going back into the world of Aestemyr. Specifically, we’re working on a new game that takes place in Valskyrr.



Let’s start with December last year. We were just done with the last Kickstarter of the year: the first non-Mistfall (game system wise) game set in the Mistfall world Aestemyr, first prepared as a bonus for backers of Heart of the Mists, but then Kickstarted separately because of its rising popularity – and our knowledge that we would have to reprint the game immediately after concluding the fulfilment. The little game that could (surprise us so much) was Shadowscape.

Working on Shadowscape I had had a few non-design things in mind. Looking at my own gaming shelves I wanted to test the waters with a game that would easily fit even a crowded game storage space, one that would not cost a fortune, but also one that would explode on the table, proving that a big game can come in a small box. “It’s small, but it packs a lot of punch!” I wanted people to say, and… well, they did.

Fast forward to this year’s UK Games Expo, and my first chance to actually present and sell Shadowscape at a convention. The reactions to the game were almost identical every time: people would sit down, I’d explain the game, there’d be some nodding, and a few questions. Sometimes (especially after I got a hold of a bigger table), a couple of turns would be played. People were having a great time, which usually ended up with a pleasant surprise.

Let’s go back to December 2016. The little game known as Shadowscape which had sold once already as part of a bigger Kickstarter, went to beat our expectations when crowd-funded on its own. The campaign is over, a few days have gone since NSKN Games went on a Christmas and New Year break, and I’m looking at the handsome little box that contains Shadowscape.
I do not yet know, that six months later, I will end almost each demo of Shadowscape with having to answer one question: “So, this handy box has all that game inside?” Having to answer “yes” each and every time.

Yet, I am still the December version of myself, an I don’t know all of that yet, but I decide that making another game equally small, but also at least as meaty is something I want to do. As it starts snowing outside, I conclude that Aestemyr in general, and Valskyrr specifically is the place I want to return to – as do many of those, who fell in love with the lands of sand and snow.

So, after kissing my wife goodnight, I lean back on my chair, take a notepad and draw a shape of a card. An hour later, having already crumpled a few sheets, I come upon the heart of this new game.

Right above the card I’m preliminarily satisfied with, I write: “Aestemyr needs Heroes once again.” And then, at the top of the sheet, in much bigger letters: “Chronicles of Frost”.

And that is how another journey begins.
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Sun Oct 22, 2017 9:23 pm
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