The Word of the Day! (An ongoing project)
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
Recommend
148 
 Thumb up
28.75
 tip
 Hide
I like words. Really I do. I occasionally read books about linguistics for pleasure. Which may seem odd.

And so when I was trying to decide on a new project for me*, the thought "why not do a word of the day" list popped into my feverish mind.

And so here it is - the Word of the Day. Read and enjoy (and subscribe if you want to follow it). And remember: Fun Facts may or may not be fun, or factual.

Edit: I have done a meta-list summarizing the words; you can scan and search for words (control-F or the equivalent for your browser) if you want to see whether I've done some word or other. Here it is: Word of the Day Summary Geeklist

*My previous projects: This Day - EVERY DAY - in History (a 366-Item Geeklist, Eventually) and This Day in Pre-History
Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
  • [+] Dice rolls
1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5  Next »  [69] | 
1. Board Game: Happy New Year [Average Rating:6.00 Unranked]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
YEAR

As in "Happy New Year"!!! We all know the word - it's a noun and it means a year (duh), you know in casual usage, the period it takes the Earth to make a complete circuit around the Sun, 365.25 days approximately. Or for somebody watching from the surface of this planet, the time it takes the Sun to make a pass thru the zodiac. Or maybe it's a level or grade in school. Or all of the above, and more. What 'year' doesn't have is an internationally accepted symbol for it as a unit of time... So think on that.

What's so interesting about the word 'year'? Well mainly it's just that today is a good day to think about the passage of years, is what. But every word if you think about it is interesting. Year is derived from West Saxon "gear" and in Middle English was "yeer"; it comes from words with connotations of a complete circuit (which makes sense). As a word dates back before the year 900. Lots of cognates with various other Germanic languages.

Fun fact: when you're a kid a year seems an impossibly long time. When you're an adult, they fly by.
17 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
2. Board Game: Janus [Average Rating:5.59 Overall Rank:11424]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
JANUARY

The word for the day is January, because it is! It's January, I mean, you know, temporally. I always liked how this word sounds. Kinda portentous somehow. And as the word representing the opening month of the new year, that seems appropriate.

"January" as a word is based on the Latin, via Middle English and Norman French, and means "the month of Janus". In fact, ALL words for months in English are based on Latin. But somehow, we ended up with a mixed pantheon for the days of the week. But I digress.

So who was Janus and why did he rate the lead-off slot in the calendar? Well he was a Roman god of transitions, beginnings, endings, doorways and the like. He's two-faced not because he's duplicitous, but rather he is looking ahead and behind (a theme the Romans, ever looking abroad for religious inspiration, appear to have lifted from Babylon). Kind of like a paranoid card shark who cheated a gunslinger in his last poker game in Deadwood circa 1876.

Janus' association with beginnings and transitions adds to his appeal (and the appeal of the word "January") for me, since I've been moving around on a pretty regular basis since I was a whelp...

Fun Fact: The International Poets Association voted January as tied with February for "the hardest month to make a decent rhyme with" at PoetryCon Paris in 1903, while at the very same time the Brotherhood of Actuaries voted the word into its linguistic Hall of Fame at their convention in Lansing, Michigan.
14 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
3. Board Game: Stock Market Guru [Average Rating:5.79 Overall Rank:10435]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
RANDOM

No this wasn't a random choice. This word comes up a lot on BGG (often as a criticism), and nowadays is in more general usage than I remember it being, though often in a way that doesn't really mean 'random' as far as I can see - more like 'odd and/or unpredictable' to steal a line from dictionary.com, or even an implication of 'not belonging here'.

The dictionary says of random: 1) "proceeding, made, or occurring without definite aim, reason, or pattern: the random selection of numbers." 2) (in statistics) "of or characterizing a process of selection in which each item of a set has an equal probability of being chosen."

The second definition seems to fit BGG life better than the first. A good game usually doesn't proceed without definite aim, reason, or pattern. But the process of selecting something (whether from a card draw or a die roll, for example) with equal probabilities is a pretty common game thing, right? I think when random/randomness is criticized, it's just people criticizing luck which isn't quite the same thing. But that's OK - many things in life really are random, chaotic, based on luck or chance, whatever your preferred phrase may be. I'm okay with it being included in games too.

Anyhow, as a word 'random' seems to date to the middle ages; one site gives a first use as 1632. Seems derived from old English and possibly French, from words that had the meaning of speed and impetuosity.

There is one concept that involves the word that I really like: 'random walk', a mathematical way to describe a path that is simply a succession of sequential but random (in direction and perhaps in length) steps. That can describe things like molecular movements. Or the price of a fluctuating stock, or collection of stocks... with the talking heads on CNBC ascribing agency and meaning to the fact that the market was up 1.8% today to the flooding in Borneo purely out of that human habit of discerning patterns and order where they may not in fact exist.

But I'm rambling now, if not quite randomly.

Fun Fact: Walking around rolling dice to make random decisions on what to buy at a grocery store is a very poor technique for meeting prospective mates.

*Dictionary.reference.com
14 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
4. Board Game: Nonsense [Average Rating:6.11 Overall Rank:8269]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
FOOFARAW

Did you ever want to say something that makes you sound like a real old-timer square? Then try "foofaraw"! It's fun!

Many of you probably haven't heard of this word - especially if you don't live in North America. That's okay, it's pretty obscure even here. The meaning is excessive or flashy ornamentation (like using diamonds instead of cubes for playing Pandemic), or a big fuss over something small, like arguing over whether Twilight Struggle is or is not a wargame.

Some website claims "foofaraw" is derived from the Spanish word fanfarrón (boaster), and/or the French word frou-frou but that sounds like a bunch of foofaraw to me. In any case, the word appears to have originated around 1934 or so.

Fun Fact: Steve Jobs considered calling the iPad the iFoofaraw.
14 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
5. Board Game: SAD... The Game of Depression [Average Rating:7.00 Unranked]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
DISAPPOINTMENT

The feeling a Cincinnati Bengals' fan generally has after a game. Especially if they somehow were allowed into a playoff game.

Well technically "disappointment" is of course, 'the state or feeling of being disappointed'... and "to be disappointed" of course is what happens when hopes or expectations fail to be met.

It doesn't mean "to fire" - you know, to dis- appoint somebody. But apparently in the 15th century Middle French from where this word entered English, it actually did mean to remove somebody from office. Often, NFL head coaches who invoke disappointment are disappointed in the "remove from office" sense. Though actually I like Marv Lewis (Bengals' coach) and don't really suggest that...

Fun Fact: It is much more fun to see other people being disappointed than to feel disappointment yourself. Unless the disappointed person is your mom, in which case your sense of disappointment grows.
14 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
6. Board Game: War of the Ring (Second Edition) [Average Rating:8.39 Overall Rank:13]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
NAZGUL

Silly on-line dictionaries. Most of them don't recognize "nazgul" as a word. Well it must be a word. I mean, I had nine of them on my side in my game of War of the Rings today. And just because it is a concept that doesn't exist doesn't mean it shouldn't be in the dictionary, does it? I mean, "utopia" has a listing?

Well among a certain class of fantasy/SF fans this is a pretty recognizable word for not being in the dictionary. Probably even MORE recognizable since Peter Jackson's film adaptation of The Lord of the Rings was viewed by about a trillion people. But just because it's a made up word doesn't mean it doesn't have an etymology. It comes from the language of Mordor, known as Black Speech; "nazg" meaning "ring" and "gul" being "wraith". Pretty simple really.

One of the things I like about reading Tolkien was the interesting made-up words and languages he used. I tended to skip over the poetry in LOTR and definitely the Elvish, but the whole backstory - linguistic and historical - meant that LOTR had something that I often wish other novels had; the Rest of the Story.

Fun Fact: The collective noun used to describe a group of nazgul is 'gaggle', just like for geese. Except geese aren't as bad-ass.
13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
7. Board Game: Jazz King [Average Rating:4.50 Unranked]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
JAZZ

This evening I watched the first two hours of Spike Lee's heart-rending documentary When the Levees Broke (about Hurricane Katrina and New Orleans). (Big sigh) But this movie reminded me again how New Orleans is the home of the popular music known as "jazz".

I won't define "jazz" because (1) it would take a long time and to a certain extent, definitions vary. The etymology is interesting - actually, it's not known for certain where the word came from, which led the American Dialect Society to dub "jazz" the "Word of the Century". The earliest use of the word may be in 1912, where a baseball pitcher for a minor league team in Oregon called his new curve ball a "Jazz ball". With "jazz" derived from "jism", which in the 19th century meant spirit or energy, which would make sense in the curve ball example. Now that word typically refers to semen. Also a theory "jazz" was based on a French verb jaser (to chat).

Anyway the word wasn't originally connected to the music being developed in New Orleans. The first record of associating the word to the music was in the Chicago Daily Tribune in 1915; that spread, and was first used to describe music in New Orleans in that city's Times-Picayune newspaper in November 1916. The music jazz had already been there; now the perfect word had arrived.

Fun Fact: New Orleans' international airport is names for jazz great Louis Armstrong.


13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
8. Board Game: A Game of Thrones: The Card Game – Refugees of War [Average Rating:6.99 Unranked] [Average Rating:6.99 Unranked]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
REFUGEE

I watched another installment of Spike Lee's When the Levees Break (about Hurricane Katrina) tonight. The word that sticks with me is "refugee" (also hurricane, flood, and Cajun). Some of the interviewed Louisianans who had been scattered across the US after Katrina took exception at the media calling them "refugee"; many of them seemed to take that as some sort of questioning of their very American citizenship. That interpretation surprised me a little. So I looked up the word in several reputable sources.

All the sources I consulted agree that this involves a person who flees. However, just about all the sources also agree that there is a strong connotation of fleeing due to political upheaval or war, and almost as strong a link to the idea of fleeing to another country. In fact, this is the case in international law. The UN convention that governs the status of refugees defines "refugee" as somebody who "owing to a well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group, or political opinion, is outside the country of his nationality, and is unable to or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country."

So, the people of Louisiana who resent being called "refugees" had some cause. "Refugee", which entered English from French, based on the past participle of the verb refugier "to take refuge" (first applied to the Huegenots, French Protestants who migrated after the anti-Protestant Edict of Nantes in 1685), was perhaps not the right word. But apart from the generic term "victim" or maybe "evacuee" (which isn't a perfect fit itself), I'm not sure what the right word would be.

Fun Fact: Refugees never have any fun.
11 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
9. Board Game: Zeppelin [Average Rating:5.44 Overall Rank:12575]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
ZEPPELIN

What's the difference between a politician and a zeppelin? One's a bag full of hot air, the other is a mode of transportation. OK bad joke, but zeppelin is a cool word.

You know what it is right? Big bag full of hot air - but a rigid bag so the zep has a different shape than a regular old hot air balloon. This is an easy word to identify the origin, since the device itself only dates back to the late 19th century (patented in Germany in 1895). This type of rigid airship took its name from the German nobleman Ferdinand von Zeppelin. This scion of an old noble family joined the Württemberg army, and served as an observer for that army to the American Civil War, where he saw Union forces using balloons to observe Confederate lines in the Peninsular Campaign. Zeppelin worked on airships full-time after he retired from the army in 1881 and is credited as the inventor of the type of airship that bears his name. Speaking of which, his name comes from his family's old home town, Zepelin (one 'p'), in Mecklenburg.

Oh and why is this the word of the day? Because it is Jimmy Page's 68th birthday...

Fun Fact: Zeppelin in Japanese is "ze-pu-ree-n".
13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
10. Board Game: Tremble ye Tyrants [Average Rating:0.00 Unranked]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
QUAKE (v)

Just as a word, "to quake" has always resonated with me. It is the q/k combination plus the scarcity factor the letter 'q'.

"To quake" usually has "to tremble or shake" as the first definition, which is fine. It is of course from this that the noun "quake" combines with another word to form the word "earthquake". But the secondary meaning intrigues me more: to tremble or shake from fear (or cold). It's a bit disconcerting, to imagine quaking from fear. I don't think I've ever had the misfortune to do so for real - I mean, saying that I'm quaking in fear over taking an important test or about having to speak in public is really just a bit of exaggeration for effect. But I've certainly seen film and photos of people in terrible situations whe clearly are quaking from fear - fear for their life - and it's really uncomfortable.

Etymology - comes from Middle English "quaken". One source notes it is ultimately of unknown origin with no certain cognates. Another relates it to words in Proto-Germanic and Proto-Indo-European - two languages constructed by linguists, so uncertain and in any case a bit obvious since English is a Germanic and Indo-European language.

A quote from that very cool customer, Katharine Hepburn: “Everyone thought I was bold and fearless and even arrogant, but inside I was always quaking.”

Fun Fact: The name "Quakers" (for the religious group formally known as the Society of Friends) means "to tremble in the way of the Lord."
14 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
11. Board Game: Royalty [Average Rating:6.00 Unranked]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
ROYALTY

"Royalty" - you mean, the rank of people who are members of the class that provides monarchs? Well yes - the word does refer to the class that was headed in France's case by Louis XVI at the time of their revolution.

But the word has a different meaning. Royalty - or often its plural, royalties - is also used to describe payments from one party to another to use the second party's asset. The term royalties can cover a LOT of different things. For example, the state of Alaska charges royalties to companies that extract minerals and energy resources from the state and its waters - and this is a very common thing around the world.

But it can apply to payments received for the use of other assets as well. For example, radio stations pay royalties when they play a song by a musical act; the writer of the same song (or more accurately, whoever owns the song...) collects royalties when sheet music of the song is sold. The estate of JRR Tolkien collects royalties whenever a game company markets a game based on Middle Earth. Photographers (Instagram notwithstanding) can collect royalties if one of their images is used in an advertisement. And patent holders may often gain royalties by selling the right to use their patent to another party.

"Royalty" in the regal or kingly sense derives from the French and dates back to the 1300s. The economic use of the word began in the late 15th century - not surprisingly, derived from the idea of rights or privileges granted to an individual or corporation by a sovereign - a gift from royalty. By the mid-19th century, it covered much more including payment to landowners to operate a mine, or payment to authors or composers for the purchase or use of their work.

Fun Fact: As wealthy as British royalty are, they can't touch the royalties paid globally for mining rights or music...
14 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
12. Board Game: Nuclear War [Average Rating:6.21 Overall Rank:2172] [Average Rating:6.21 Unranked]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
RETALIATE (v)

You know how when some twit cuts you off on the highway and you feel like shoving him off the road and then clubbing him to death with a rock? Well, that is a desire to retaliate. To repay in kind; to get revenge.

It's a pretty common human impulse, perhaps not one of our finer ones. You see it in the cradle, where one toddler shoves another, and the second one hits right back. The strategic nuclear war concept of massive retalation - and of being prepared to retaliate - is also the basis for Mutual Assured Destruction. It was today in 1954 that John Foster Dulles, US Secretary of State, announced the doctrine of massive retaliation.

As a word, retaliate entered English from the Latin word which meant legal retaliation, first usage around 1611.

Fun Fact: It can be satisfying to retaliate... but be prepared for the counter-retaliation...
17 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
13. Board Game: Blackout [Average Rating:0.00 Unranked]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
BLACKOUT

You know what happened with BGG on Sunday, when it went down for however many long, terrible hours it went down for? It suffered a blackout, that's what.

There are a lot of different meanings of "blackout". One is of course the idea of an electrical power outage; the meaning is often extended to other types of interruptions, such as a loss of a radio signal or your favorite website of all of them. But there are other definitions too. One that I knew of was the idea of shutting off lights and blocking windows to blackout a city facing a potential bombing raid. My grandparents were from Coventry, England; I remember them telling me about the bombings and them affixing blackout fabric to the windows and having the lights off when there were raids.

A couple of commercial uses too - in the US, some sporting events (notably NFL football) will be "blacked out" from being shown in the local market if the game has not sold out. Cincinnati Bengals fans will be familiar with this phenomenon. And if you have a lot of frequent flyer miles you will quickly become familiar with blackout dates when you cannot cash in your bazillion miles for a flight.

And of course there is the blackout that I recommend against - "the transient dulling or loss of vision, consciousness, or memory". These temporary losses of consciousness known as blackouts are often associated with drinking too much too quickly.

But the word itself dates back only about 100 years - in fact first usage is given as 1908 or 1913. It came from the theater - to blackout is to darken the stage at the end of a scene. Interesting how it has been picked up for so many different uses.

Fun fact: A power outage in India in the summer of 2012 affected 670 million people. That is equal to more than twice the population of the United States with a couple of Australias thrown in.
12 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
14. Board Game: Turn Over [Average Rating:0.00 Unranked]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
OVERWHELM

So how did I miss the word of the day* yesterday? Well, I had a heck of a day at work and after getting home very late wasn't ready to do anything requiring any effort, mental or otherwise. And "I'm feeling overwhelmed tonight" was the feeling that crossed my mind...

The verb "to overwhelm" seems to have joined the English language in the 1300s. It was formed from the prefix "over" and the old Middle English verb "whelmen". "Whelmen" had more than one meaning - one was to submerge or capsize, but it also had the sense of to experience a reversal, or "to make an arch cover" (??). Interestingly (well to me anyway), the ME verb "whelven" included the sense of being brought to ruin.

Anyway the modern word "overwhelm" still has the sense of capsizing or submerging, but now unless you are a sailor or deep sea fisherman I think it is more associated with overcoming or defeating by superior strength or force (India overwhelmed Portuguese defenses in Goa in 1961, or the Crimson Tide overwhelmed the Fighting Irish in this year's college football BCS "championship" game), OR in the emotional/intellectual sense, to overpower in thought or feeling. As in, I felt overwhelmed by work.

Fun fact: "Underwhelm", as in to fail to impress, has a first known use of 1948. But if we take under- as the opposite of over-, and assume therefore that this is the opposite of submerge, to be underwhelmed could mean to float above the waves. Like a hovercraft. Or not. Perhaps you are underwhelmed by my logic.

*Note: Nothing in this list legally requires me to do one word per day...
14 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
15. Board Game: Trial Lawyer [Average Rating:3.33 Unranked]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
AVOCADO

This one was suggested to me and a fine suggestion it is. In modern English of course, this word refers to the fruit of the avocado tree, found in central Mexico. We use it for guacamole and other tasty food treats; first recorded use in English is around 1697.

But what's interesting is how the word came about. The Nahua people of course knew about this plant; when the Spanish showed up they naturally started with the Nahuatl word for it, which was āhuacatl. To Spanish ears, that sounded like the Spanish word (as it existed at the time), avocado, which meant lawyer (now it is abogado).

So a bit of pun-play in the name. But there is a visual pun at work too. Because the Nahuatl word āhuacatl also meant "testicle". When you look at the shape of the avocado fruit hanging from the tree, it isn't hard to imagine why.

Fun fact: If you use Google Translate and start with "avocado" in Spanish and translate into French, it renders it as avocat - lawyer.
14 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
16. Board Game: Recognizing Fractions Match Wits [Average Rating:0.00 Unranked]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
RECOGNIZE

So yesterday for the first time in 20 years, the United States recognized Somalia. No, I don't mean that the US couldn't pick Somalia out of a line-up of countries. The US formally acknowledged the government of President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud as the government of Somalia.

It's a bit of a diplomatic nicety in many ways, but recognition in this sense is NOT automatic. For example, the United States did not recognize the government in Beijing that ruled over the land-mass known as "China" until 1979 - despite the Communists having been in power on the mainland since the 1949 establishment of the People's Republic of China, the US (and many others) recognized the government of the KMT on Taiwan as the Republic of China.

Even today, the ROC and PRC compete for diplomatic recognition. An assortment of mostly poor countries recognize ROC/Taiwan, usually in exchange for foreign aid. And some of these countries change their minds every few years as Beijing and Taipei bid for their diplomatic affection.

Recognize came into English in the 15th century from old French. It now carries the sense of "hey this guy looks familiar I recognize him from college"; the diplomatic sense above; the sense of awarding (Aldie was recognized for service to boardgaming with the Nobel Prize today); and realizing (I recognize that my attire is unconventional but I like to wear a tutu to play hockey). I recognize that recognize is a versatile verb.

Fun Fact: In the 1910s following the collapse of the Manchu Dynasty, the only country to recognize Mongolian independence was Tibet; and the only country to recognize Tibetan independence was Mongolia.
13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
17. Board Game: Word Trek [Average Rating:4.25 Unranked]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
WORD

Word, bro, word of the day is literally "word". Such a short and important word, is word. A technical description of it can read so: word is the smallest element that may be uttered in isolation with semantic or pragmatic content (with literal or practical meaning).* This is in contrast to a morpheme, a sound which may have meaning but isn't a complete word in itself, like say the suffix -ish (as in goodish or nearish).

But word is a versatile, yay verily a polysemic word. In addition to the linguistic definition above, it can also mean news or rumor ("What's the word back home, Jen?"). Or you can give your word as in, promise - and relatedly, to take somebody at their word is to choose to believe what they said. An argument between you and me could be described as us having words (this usage has been around since the 1400s). Or it could be a very short chat - "Can I have a word with you before the meeting, boss?" As a verb "to word" means to express in words. Or it could be the name brand for a word processing program from a major software manufacturer, Microsoft...

Word is an old word in English - dates back to Middle and Old English, first use some time before 1100. And it has cognates in many Germanic languages.

Fun fact: Never ask Peter Griffin what the word is.

*wiktionary.org

edit: typo
13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
18. Board Game: Hostage: The Board Game [Average Rating:4.40 Unranked]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
HOSTAGE

Hostages have unfortunately again been in the news recently, specifically in Algeria where the hostage takers who seized the natural gas plant and its workers were unhappy about France's recent intervention in Mali (edit: or were out to make a buck, or maybe both). Which made me wonder about the word and how odd it seems to me that "hostage" resembles the word "host".

First the definition: the Algerian situation was an example of one meaning, a person taken by force to secure the taker's demands - i.e., France out of Mali. This is the meaning most understood in the modern world.

But turns out the resemblance between "hostage" and "host" isn't entirely coincidental. The word entered English in the 13th century from French, specifically the Old French word hostage and from hoste, which has the sense of "A person given as a pledge or security for the performance of the conditions of a treaty or stipulations of any kind, on the performance of which the person is to be released."* The original concept in France and England (and in Westeros and indeed elsewhere) was to have the scion of a rival noble or royal family live with you in your castle as a guarantee against the young person's family misbehaving by say launching a war against you. So these young nobles and princes were hosted by the noble family wishing to guarantee good behavior. Hostages were also taken as prisoners of war for the same reason.

And on this day in 1981, the American diplomats held hostage by Iranians in Tehran were released after 444 days of captivity.

Fun fact: The Stockholm Syndrome, about captives beginning to emphathize or identify with their captors, dates back to a bank robbery in Stockholm in August 1973.

*wiktionary.org
12 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
19. Board Game: Mr. President [Average Rating:6.61 Overall Rank:4047]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
INAUGURATION

Earlier today was the formal ceremony to mark the beginning of President Obama's second term - in US political parlance, this is known as the "inauguration". Actually, Obama was legally sworn in for his second term yesterday since the Constitution as amended specifies January 20, but it is the practice when the 20th falls on a Sunday to hold the public events on the following Monday.

In this context, "inauguration" refers to the formal induction into office of somebody such as a US president. It seems to me that the word is only used like this in the context of presidents, not other heads of state. In any case I see references to "inauguration" for the presidents of Russia, Brazil, and the Philippines not just the US.

Inaugurate in its various forms can also refer to the (usually formal) beginning of a new process, course of action, etc.

The word, as true for many in English, comes from Latin via French, inauguration. Interestingly, the original meaning of the Latin verb inaugurare from where the English and French words came was "(to) take omens from the flight of birds; consecrate or install when such omens are favorable;"* the fact that "inaugurate" includes "augur" (as in augury) is no coincidence.

Fun fact: The first Chief Justice to preside at a US presidential inauguration was Oliver Ellsworth, who swore in President John Adams in March 1797.

*etymonline.com
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
20. Board Game: Cold Feet [Average Rating:0.00 Unranked]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
COLD

This morning when I stepped outside, I felt something I haven't really felt in the past couple of years in Northern Virginia. Cold. As in, well below freezing. For a split second it was a pleasant feeling. Then I hustled into the car and turned the heater on high.

Cold is an old and versatile word in English. It dates back to around 1300, based on the Old English "cald". It carries the sense of "lack of heat" both as a noun ("The cold crept into my bones") and an adjective ("she ate a cold sandwich"), not to mention the description of being uncomfortable due to the ambient temperature ("I'm cold, turn on the heat!"). This of course is all subjective - a cold day for Sicily, for example, might register as a pleasantly warm springtime day in Mongolia.

But cold has taken on many other meanings. There is cold in the emotional sense - devoid of emotions or human warmth. Or in the decorating sense - a room can be called cold because of the decor. In sports, you don't want to be cold; that means you're in a slump. And it can be used roughly like "totally"; he was cold sober but she turned him down cold. A scent can be cold (as in not strong) in hunting or detective work.

And of course you can catch a cold, which in English means to get sick from a virus, the common cold.

Fun fact: "To catch a cold" if transliterated into Mongolian (using the Mongolian verb for "to catch" and the adjective for "cold") means "to contract a venereal disease." I am not making this up.
9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
21. Board Game: Road Trip [Average Rating:5.75 Unranked]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
TRIP

So I was on business trip where I was overwhelmed and recognized there would have to be a brief blackout on my Word of the Day list. I felt disappointment at hitting a cold streak like this so early in the year. But I didn't let all this random jazz hold me hostage, nor did I quake like an avocado being menaced by a Nazgul.

Instead, I wondered at the word "trip" - an old word from Middle English and French. I was on a business trip - as in a a journey (1690s). But trip is another polysemic word full of fun meanings. The one I usually think of, beyond the business trip, is when you stumble (1650s). This started with the literal meaning - you know, catching your foot on the curb and tripping. It can also be transitive, like sticking your foot out to trip somebody on the bus. But it has taken on the sense of making a mental or verbal error or miscue as well, like when Dan Quayle famously tripped over the spelling of the word "potato".

Engineers will also recognize that trip can be a way of activating a device - or a cutout to turn off something (1897). Like tripping a circuit breaker when the power surges. There is a somewhat archaic sense of to perform or to dance, as in "to trip the light fantastic", or to tread lightly or caper. This was in fact the first meaning of trip in English back in the 14th century.

And of course, the sense of a mental journey induced by some sort of drug like LSD - tripping in the way Jerry Garcia of the Grateful Dead probably meant when he sang "what a long strange trip it's been." First used around 1959 as a noun and 1966 as a verb.

Fun fact: Trip is a brand of juice in Finland, and TRIP is an airline in Brazil.
10 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
22. Board Game: Vanished Planet [Average Rating:5.86 Overall Rank:5929]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
VANISH

I've just begun reading a book called Vanished Kingdoms, about former European states that are no longer around. And I began to think about the word vanish.

It seems a rather unusual word to me, maybe because the letter 'v' is one of the less common ones in English. Unlike some words I've looked at lately, this one has basically one normal meaning - to vanish is to disappear (quickly implied), or to go out of existence completely. So something can vanish like a watch in the hands of a magician, or it can vanish like the dodo, or the Soviet Union.

There is a secondary but closely related meaning. In mathematics, if a function or variable goes to zero, it vanishes. Which makes sense. And you may have heard of the vanishing point, from art.

Vanish has been in English since at least the 1300s. The Middle English was "vanisshen", which came from Latin via Anglo-French. The Latin evanescere meant to disappear or die out - and vanish shares this as a source with the modern word "evanescence".

Fun fact: Famous vanished people include Amelia Earhart and Owain Glyndŵr, the last native Welsh person to be the Prince of Wales, who disappeared in 1412.
13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
23. Board Game: Karmas [Average Rating:5.25 Unranked]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
KARMA

One of the strengths of the English language has been the willingness and ability to incorporate foreign words. There are of course huge overlays of Latin and French onto English, due in no small part to the Norman Conquest of 1066 and the spread of Christianity in the initial form of Catholicism from even earlier. Not to mention Rome's occupation itself.

But English draws from elsewhere as well. One such great word is karma, from Sanskrit, which first appeared in English in 1827. Various dictionaries define it in different ways but the best one for the main meaning in everyday English is from wiktionary: "The idea that one reaps what one sows..." You cheated on your wife with her sister and then left your wife to marry said sister, and then subsequently your ex-wife becomes filthy rich and your new wife dumps you for your younger brother? Bad karma, dude.

There is also the more technical meaning of karma, the idea in religions and philosophies from the Indian sub-continent about how what you do and how you act will determine how you come back in your next incarnation.

Fun fact: On this day in 1970, John Lennon wrote and recorded "Instant Karma." That's good karma.
15 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
24. Board Game: Queen Bee [Average Rating:5.64 Unranked]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
ABDICATE

Today Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands announced her intention to abdicate the throne in favor of her son, Willem-Alexander. And so the word for the day is "abdicate".

The most common use is the one above - to formally renounce a position with no possibility of regaining it. Normally used for monarchs, generally. It would sound a bit odd to say a CEO or sports coach had abdicated. Abdicate can also have the sense of giving up responsibility for something as well.

But abdicate has some other now-obsolete meanings. It used to be a transitive verb as well in the sense of removing somebody from the throne the way the revolution deposed (abdicated) King Louis XVI from the French throne. It also had the meaning of disowning.

The word is first recorded in English in 1541. Straight from Latin abdicare, to disown.

Fun fact: British monarchs generally do not abdicate voluntarily; Edward VIII did so in 1936 under scandalous circumstances. So don't hold your breath waiting for Elizabeth II to abdicate.

edit: typo
19 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
25. Board Game: Goggle Eyes [Average Rating:4.66 Unranked]
Wendell
United States
Yellow Springs
Ohio
flag msg tools
Si non potes reperire Berolini in tabula, ludens essetis non WIF.
badge
Hey, get your stinking cursor off my face! I got nukes, you know.
Avatar
mb
GOGGLE/GOGGLES

Watching Jeopardy tonight, one of the questions was "What are goggles?" 'What a fine word' I think to myself. Except it's kind of two words - goggle, and goggles. We'll take 'em both.

First the verb - goggle. Simple - generally means to stare with wide eyes. I have to say I don't really think of "goggle" when "staring with wide eyes" comes up. It also apparently can mean "to leer" or "to roll" (your eyes). Nope, I don't use that at all. Even though the word is first recorded in 1541, from the Middle English gogelen, which has the eye-rolling meaning.

"Goggles" however... you know, protective eye-wear that is made to fit tightly against your face. Protective spectacles that can keep the water or dust or sparks out of your eyes. And nowadays, a device that covers the eyes that gives you the ability to see in the dark, as in night-vision goggles. Came from "goggle" of course, and first appeared in 1715.

Fun fact: The budget for goggles in the Road Warrior movies was over $2 billion. Maybe.

9 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5  Next »  [69] | 
Loading... | Locked Hide Show Unlock Lock Comment     View Previous {{limitCount(numprevitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
{{error.message}}
{{comment.error.message}}
    View More Comments {{limitCount(numnextitems_calculated,commentParams.showcount)}} / {{numnextitems_calculated}} 1 « Pg. {{commentParams.pageid}} » {{data.config.endpage}}
1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5  Next »  [69] | 
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.