Introducing Ted Alspach's Ultimate Werewolf: Ultimate Edition

Popularity: Some wonderful new titles have appeared in the genre of social deduction games in recent years, with games like The Resistance enjoying enormous and well-deserved success. I love games with hidden character roles, so it's exciting to see innovative and fresh games exploring the possibilities offered by this genre. But arguably the classic of the genre is the ever-green Werewolf, which is a staple of many gaming conventions, with games often operating on a large scale and going into the wee hours of the morning. It's also a big hit in play-by-forums. Werewolf is a party game that everyone should play at least once in their lifetime, and Werewolf devotees - of which there are many - find themselves happily playing it over and over again.

Concept: If you're not familiar with Werewolf, the basic concept of the game is that a group of around a dozen or more players are assigned secret character roles, corresponding to two teams: villagers and werewolves. The flow of play uses a moderator who leads the group through alternating night and day phases, as the village tries to survive the threat of the werewolves. Each night, the werewolves eat one villager, who is eliminated from the game. During the day, the villagers must use discussion to try to uncover the werewolves, and by a vote lynching one person each day, hopefully identifying and eliminating the werewolves before the villagers are outnumbered. As the circle grows smaller, there is more evidence to work with, but the tension grows! The villagers need to lynch all the werewolves in order to win. Over time, many unique and special character roles have been developed for the game, to add extra interest, variety, and enjoyment, with roles like the Seer being a standard fixture of the game. The game can accommodate very large numbers of players.

Origin: The genesis of Werewolf is usually attributed to a Russian named Dimitry Davidoff, whose original concept for the game in 1986 employed a mafia theme. An American named Andrew Plotkin reworked the game with a werewolf theme in 1997, and it is this form of the game that made it especially popular. On Plotkin's website, he credits Davidoff as the inventor, and even quotes correspondence from Davidoff (dated September 2005) about how the Mafia game originated and evolved. Wired Magazine attempted to interview Davidoff, and the results appeared in an article dated 4 February 2010. Davidoff seems rather evasive about himself and the game, and apparently only agreed to conduct the interview within World of Warcraft, via his dwarf hunter character.

Commercial editions: While the interview and story about the game's origin makes for fascinating reading, the reality is that Werewolf has largely entered the public domain, and many people around the world enjoy Mafia or Werewolf using standard playing cards to designate the different character roles in the game. But there has been demand for a commercial edition with polished artwork and properly explained rules, and in particular three different editions have appeared, namely the Are You A Werewolf? by Looney Labs, The Werewolves of Miller's Hollow by Asmodee, and Lupus in Tabula by dV Giochi & Mayfair Games. None of these, however, was entirely satisfactory. Frustrated with the deficiencies of these existing commercial editions, Ted Alspach of Bezier Games decided to publish his own version of the game - Ultimate Werewolf: Ultimate Edition. In his words: "I created Ultimate Werewolf: Ultimate Edition to address the deficiencies in other games. I was a frustrated werewolf player, owning all of the other commercial sets and always being frustrated with various issues of each...so I made my own set, initially for myself and my friends, and then published it a few years later." It first appeared in 2008, and now several editions later, here we are in 2013 with the fourth and best edition of the game yet, which is the subject of this review. This really is the ultimate purchase for the Werewolf fan, and in this article I'll tell you why!

COMPONENTS

Game box

The game-box is solidly constructed and pleasantly sized, which isn't entirely surprising that it primarily consists of cards, and its convenient size gives it the welcome advantage of portability.



The reverse side introduces us to the basic concept of Werewolf, some of the benefits of this particular edition (e.g. 80 cards with more than 40 unique roles, 18 scenarios, and the Urban Legends expansion), as well as Tom Vasel's enthusiastic endorsement: "The name is no exaggeration. A fantastic version of werewolf - the best there is."



Component list

So what do you get inside? It's mainly cards, and in a moment I'll walk you through some of the different ones that are included.
● 80 role cards
● 1 score pad
● 1 rule book



Basic cards

The cards themselves are standard playing card size (which sleevers will appreciate), and feature a quality linen finish, and attractive artwork and text. Ever since the second edition (2010), the cards have also include the text of each character's ability. On the lower left of each card is a plus/minus value, which is used to ensure the game's balance; cards with a positive value tilt the balance towards the villagers team, cards with a negative value tilt the balance towards the werewolves team.

The basic characters in a standard game of Werewolf are Werewolves, Villagers, and a Seer, and Ultimate Werewolf provides an ample number of each, with 8 Werewolves, 20 Villagers, and 2 Seers - in all likelihood much more than you'll ever need! It's certainly helpful to have extra copies of these cards in case any get marked or damaged. This is, after all, an ultimate edition!



Villager Team cards

There are 24 character cards which represent villagers with special abilities. Aside from 3 Masons, each of these is different: Apprentice Seer, Aura Seer, Bodyguard, Cupid, Diseased, Ghost, Hunter, Idiot, Lycan, Martyr, Mason, Mayor, Old Hag, Old Man, Pacifist, Priest, Prince, Private Investigator, Spellcaster, Tough Guy, Troublemaker, and Witch. These all offer unique abilities that change the game slightly. For example, the Diseased character prevents the werewolves from feeding the next night if attacked; the Hunter may immediately kill another player if he dies; and the Witch can kill or heal a player at night once each per game.



Werewolf Team cards

Three character cards assist the Werewolf team: Sorceror, Minion, and Wolf Club. For example, the Sorcerer can help identify the Seer, and the Wolf Cub will enable the Werewolves to feed twice on the night after it is lynched.



Switching Team cards

Several roles are either dual roles, or can switch to the other team as the game progresses: Cursed, Doppelganger, and Drunk. For example, the Cursed is a villager, but changes to the werewolf team if attacked by them.



Other Team cards

Ten cards feature characters that aren't on the team of the Villagers or the Werewolves: Cult Leader, Hoodlum, Tanner, Lone Wolf, and Vampire (6x). For example, the Tanner wins if he is killed; the Lone Wolf is a Werewolf team member who wins if he is the last member standing. The Cult Leader and Vampires are particularly interesting, with the Cult Leader adding one player to his cult each night, and Vampires making up a third additional major team that is immune to the Werewolves and also chooses a victim each night.



Other cards

Finally, there is a Moderator card, that can be used to select a moderator randomly for groups who prefer doing it that way; two Blank role cards, that can be used to create new roles or duplicate existing ones; and an Amulet of Protection card, which has its own special rules and is not a character card, but will be passed between characters as the game progresses, and can protect the holder from dying.



Score Pad

The score pad contains sheets that can be used by the moderator to help keep track of roles or other special conditions during the game. It can be particularly useful in more complicated games with many different roles, for example to keep track of the order that roles need to be called, the characters in play, victims, etc.



Rule book

The rulebook is one of the highlights of this edition of the game. It's a glossy booklet that consists of 16 pages of fairly small print, but it is jam-packed with wonderful Werewolf essentials and tips.
● Overview of how to play a basic Werewolf game (2 pages)
● Rules variations, e.g. different ways of role revealing, nominating/voting, using the amulet of protection (2 pages)
● Moderator Guide, e.g. tips on creating atmosphere, setting up the room, using the scorepad, explaining the game, and more (2 pages)
● Team Building, e.g. ideas about how to use Werewolf as a team building exercise for meetings, presentations, workshops (1 page)
● Scenarios, e.g. custom charts with different combinations of roles (3 pages)
● Role cards, e.g. explanation of all the different roles in the game (6 pages)
● Extra stuff, e.g. information about the designer, artist, history, and expansions (1 page)
● Quick Reference, e.g. information about set-up and flow of play (1 page)

Enough can't be said about how fantastic this rulebook is, with its invaluable tips and ideas for running a successful Werewolf game. There's good reason that the rulebook is not available electronically - Ted Alspach has put an enormous amount of effort sharing from his own wealth of experience about the game, and it really shows. Many people will find that the value of Ultimate Werewolf is in the rulebook alone!



EXPANSIONS

Since the initial release of Ultimate Werewolf in 2008, several small expansions have appeared, some of which have been included in the different editions of the game, such as the fourth edition which includes the Urban Legends expansion.

Classic Movie Monsters



Ultimate Werewolf: Classic Movie Monsters is a small six-card expansion released in 2010, which includes the following additional characters: Count Dracula, The Mummy, Teenage Werewolf, Frankenstein's Monster, The Blob, and Zombie. All of these new roles are themed around an idea related to the movie story. This expansion is available separately, but is included as part of the second edition (2010) of the game.

Night Terrors



Ultimate Werewolf: Night Terrors is a small six-card expansion released in 2011, which includes the following additional characters: The Count, Insomniac, Bogeyman, Dreamwolf, Beholder, and The Thing (that goes `bump' in the night). As you'd imagine, all of these new roles have an effect on the night-time part of the game. This expansion is available separately, but is included as part of the third edition (2011) of the game.

Urban Legends



Ultimate Werewolf: Urban Legends is a small six-card expansion released in 2013, which includes the following additional characters: Sasquatch, Nostradamus, Bloody Mary, Leprechaun, Chupacabra, and Wolf Man. These include some switching team roles, and inject some very fun concepts into the game. This expansion is available separately, but is included as part of the fourth edition (2013) of the game.

Artifacts



Ultimate Werewolf Artifacts is a larger expansion released in 2011, and unlike the other expansions it doesn't add new characters, but 40 artifact cards that can be used with any version of Werewolf. Each player gets an artifact card that gives them a special unique ability, e.g. The Coin of Youth, The Ring of Truth, and The Prism of Power. Some of these abilities do mirror existing character abilities. They do have the potential to create additional imbalance and chaos, but on the positive side they add extra possibilities and help change up the game.

EDITIONS OF ULTIMATE WEREWOLF

Since Ultimate Werewolf has already been through several different versions (see Ted's overview in this list), it's helpful to give a quick overview of which ones they are, and how the current fourth edition differs from them:

Ultimate Editions

First Edition (2008) - The first "Ultimate Edition", and very similar to the current version, which has 80 cards. Unlike the subsequent editions, the text of each character's ability wasn't printed on the cards.

Second Edition (2010) - Some small changes, and included the 6 card expansion Classic Movie Monsters.

Third Edition (2011) - Some small changes, and included the 6 card expansion Night Terrors.

Fourth Edition (2013) - Some small changes, and included the 6 card expansion Urban Legends.

Basically there's not much difference between the Ultimate Editions from the 2nd edition onwards, which is the point where character ability text was added to the cards; the main difference is which mini-expansion is included.


The evolution of the Werewolf cards

Other Editions

Whitebox Edition (2007) - This was Ted Alspach's first shot at making an edition of Werewolf that improved on all the existing published versions. Only several hundred copies were produced, with handcut cards.

Compact Edition (2010) - This is essentially a pocket version of Ultimate Werewolf, with 40 cards instead of 80 (with 24 unique roles instead of 40), and a condensed rulebook that has only about a third of the content as the rulebook of the Ultimate edition.



COMPARISON WITH OTHER COMMERCIAL VERSIONS

The Competition

So how does Ted Alspach's Ultimate Werewolf compare with some of the other published versions out there? While there have been a number of customized re-themings (e.g. the new Fox & Chicken uses a barnyard setting with animals), there are three other well known published versions of Werewolf to choose from, and here is a brief overview of what these offer:

Are You A Werewolf? (by Looney Labs)

Components: 2 werewolves, 12 villagers, 1 seer, plus moderator and summary cards, rules

Overview of Are You A Werewolf?
● black/white artwork
● text on character cards
● no special character roles
● 8-15 players (although you really need a third werewolf for 14-15 player games)
● minimalist rulebook
● cheap



The Werewolves of Miller's Hollow (by Asmodee)

Components: 4 werewolves, 13 villagers, 1 seer, and 6 extra characters (thief, hunter, cupido, witch, little girl, sheriff), rules

Overview of The Werewolves of Miller's Hollow
● modern/abstract artwork, needlessly obscure, hard to distinguish especially for new players
● no text on character cards
● 6 extra character roles
● square cards, non-sleevable
● 8-18 players
● minimalist rulebook, but does have some scripts/tables
● the "New Moon" expansion has some further roles/rules



Lupus in Tabula (by daVinci & Mayfair Games)

Components: 3 werewolves, 12 villagers, 1 seer, and 8 extra characters (medium, possessed, bodyguard, owl, freemasons, werehamster, mythomaniac), voting cards, summary cards, rules

Overview of Lupus in Tabula
● cartoony artwork (players can give accidental clues due to unique artwork for each villager)
● no text on character cards
● 7 extra character roles
● voting cards
● 8-25 players
● rulebook has some non-standard rules (e.g. structured & slower voting system of two nominees using cards, no-reveal rule)
● a newer edition has some improvements (e.g. some text on the cards, enhanced artwork, and availability of non-English expansions)



Why Ultimate Werewolf is the best

Given that there are already several published versions to choose from, why should you get Ultimate Werewolf? As an avid Werewolf player, Ted himself was disappointed with their shortcomings. I own two of the above published versions, and I have to agree with his assessment about their weaknesses. So that's why he set out to make things right with his ultimate version. "So...I published this version. I love werewolf, and this is what happens when you publish/design something you really love. You get the best product possible! I decided early on I wasn't going to cut corners...I was creating a version of werewolf that *I* wanted, with everything in place to make werewolf games the best they could possibly be."

Did he succeed in his goal? Absolutely! Here are some things that make Ultimate Werewolf stand out head and shoulders above the competition:




Multiple copies of common cards: Other editions have a limited number of werewolves and villagers. Not only does this mean that you can't play with a larger group, but it also means that you'll run into trouble if a key card is damaged or marked. Ultimate Werewolf has 80 cards in total, and provides more copies of the key roles of Werewolves, Villagers and Seers than you'll ever need, allowing you to replace marked/missing cards if necessary, and to play with a huge group should you wish to.

Many special characters: Most other editions only provide around half a dozen special roles, but Ultimate Werewolf has comes with around 40. Having a ton of different characters gives all kinds of possibilities for changing things up, and for adding in special abilities, to ensure constant variety and replayability, and some really interesting elements. Note there is no Little Girl character, which is widely considered to be broken (see here, here and here for discussion); as Ted says "the role tends to cause arguments, break the game, and sour people's opinions of werewolf." The vast majority of the roles that are available in Ultimate Werewolf are found in no other published version of the game, even though many of them are popularly used in the play-by-forum games of Werewolf. There is just so much potential and variety!

High-quality sleevable cards: Unlike the cards that come with most other editions of Werewolf, these are standard sized, so you can sleeve them easily if you wish. The artwork is very good, and the card quality is probably the best that I've seen in comparison to the other published versions of the game.

Explanatory text on cards: Most other editions of Werewolf don't have any explanatory text about the character abilities on the cards, and some don't even have the character names. One of the worst things that can happen in game like this is to have people misunderstanding their role or asking questions about it during the game. Ultimate Werewolf avoids that problem by having the character role clearly printed on the card, and from the second edition onward there's also a clear description of how the role works. Additionally, the character cards have icons to indicate if that role wakes up at night.

Outstanding rulebook: The instruction manual has 16 pages of small print jam-packed with hints and tips. Werewolf is a game that needs to be well-balanced and carefully run, and a minimalistic set of instructions won't really give you all the information you need. This rulebook has a ton of amazing information about the game, with detailed descriptions about the different ways to play, guidelines and hints for moderating well, good explanations of the different character roles. It's by far the best Werewolf manual in existence, with no other rulebook coming close; that makes this game well worth while just for the rulebook alone.

Various scenarios: The rulebook also contains different scenarios featuring good combinations of different characters that work well together. This helps ensure having well-balanced games with tried-and-proven sets of character roles.

Balance system: The characters of Ultimate Werewolf have positive or negative valued numbers which can be added together to indicate whether a particular set of characters is balanced towards the villagers or werewolves; a cumulative total close to zero ensures that the game is well balanced. This is a simple but brilliant system that prevents the game from being tilted too much towards one team, and makes it so much easier to set-up a game with the confidence that it will be a fairly even contest.

Score pad: The score pad is a great tool to assist the moderator in running the game smoothly, and to help keep track of the different characters and abilities in play.

Expansions: Given how many characters there are, it almost seems superfluous to start talking about expansions. But the mini-expansions available for Ultimate Werewolf are all pretty neat, and introduce some really wacky and fun ideas. The Artifacts expansion can be used with any edition of Werewolf, but it is under the Ultimate Werewolf umbrella.

Granted, you can play this with standard playing cards if you really want. So why would you buy a published version of Werewolf if that's the case? Ultimate Werewolf offers so much more than you could possibly get with plain cards. It also offers more than you can get with any other published version of the game. The multiple roles, the great aesthetics, and the wonderful rulebook - really, this is superlative all round. Ted Alspach clearly enjoys his Werewolf games, and with this fantastic edition of the game he's done a marvellous job of helping the rest of us enjoy our Werewolf games too!



What do others think?

But don't just take my word for it; let's also have a listen to what other people have to say about which version of Werewolf you should get. There is an overwhelming consensus of opinion that suggests that Ultimate Werewolf is the easily the best choice when compared with the competition:

"If I was to pick just one, I'd go with Ultimate Werewolf: Ultimate Edition as it can handle more players and also has more variety of character cards as well." - Mitch Willis
"Absolutely, unquestionably, Ultimate Werewolf. I own every version (Are You A Werewolf, The Werewolves of Miller's Hollow, Ultimate Werewolf) and I can tell you that my group doesn't even consider the other two since we got Ultimate." - Pell Bort
"Miller's Hallow cards are all artsy and hard to decipher. Ultimate Werewolf is really high quality." - Graham Smallwood
"Ultimate Werewolf: Ultimate Edition is the best commercial version, with tons and tons of roles." - Clyde W
"The ultimate werewolf: ultimate edition, is very nice. it has lots of cards to handle both large and small groups with many different roles. i also like that the role names are listed on the cards which is helpful for new players. The other really great thing about this edition is the rule book, it has a balance guide that helps you design your own role sets, but keep them balanced. each role has a listed weight and a lot of thought went into mainlining the balance for each side. I would vote for Ultimate Werewolf: Ultimate Edition." - jmilum
"As an avid werewolf player, I'd recommend the Ultimate Werewolf Edition. One of the things about the Lupus in Tabula and Miller's Hollow editions is that they do not have the name of the character on them. They use symbology. That has caused confusion on many occasions. I'm really happy with the Ultimate Werewolf edition." - Tom Thingamagummy
"The games are pretty similar, but the rule book of Ultimate WW seems to be the best by far. Also the system of Ultimate Werewolf where each roles get a sort of positive or negative score makes it much easier to construct a good role set." - Bjorn Hermans
"Ultimate Werewolf is by far the better purchase. Many more cards, characters, and ready to play scenarios. The best feature of Ultimate Werewolf are the scores applied to each character that affords quick and easy balancing of a game for any number of players." - Ed James



Related Games

Bezier Games has also published two other Werewolf type games that deserve separate mention.

Ultimate Werewolf: Inquisition (2013) is a stand-alone game for 3-12 players, and functions more like a board game, with no player elimination, and additional information available to help players in their deduction.



One Night Ultimate Werewolf (2013) is the newest member of the Ultimate Werewolf family, and is a microgame that makes the Werewolf experience work with as few as 3-6 players, and in a short time span of 5 minutes. I've reviewed it (here), and it's brilliant!



CONCLUSIONS

General Praise

Those who are critical of Ultimate Werewolf acknowledge that their beef is not with this edition as such, but because they don't like the Werewolf genre to begin with, or prefer social deduction games without player elimination (e.g. The Resistance). But this article isn't written for those people - this is for folks who enjoy Werewolf, and are wondering about the differences between editions, and which one to get. As such, there is an overwhelming consensus that it doesn't get any better than Ultimate Werewolf, as is evident from general comments like these about this game:

"The best edition of Werewolf/Mafia that I've ever played." - James Keith
"This is the ultimate version of this game. The cards are great, the illustrations are often funny, and the expanded ruleset, variants and extra roles put replayability way over the top." - Pell Bort
"This is the BEST version of Werewolf to buy right now. It's a little pricey, but the art is magnificent, the cards are very practical, and very good quality, the rulebook is top notch. And it comes with any role you could possibly think of, and a couple of blanks as well." - Chris B
"Fantastic edition! This has all the roles you may ever need and a great system of combining cards for differing numbers of people." - James Barnes
"Werewolf. With an awesome rulebook, moderator script, recommended scenarios, and balancing rules to create your own scenarios. Fantastic." - Jon Theys
"The rule book alone is worth the price of this game. it contains a really nice balance guide." - jmilum
"The BEST version of a very great game." - Mike Cross
"An extremely impressive version of werewolf! Lots of tips, lots of roles, and lots of cards ... experienced players or groups will benefit from the time and effort that went into this version." - Brad Metzler
"An excellent rulebook, nice art on the cards, a ton of characters to use. The perfect werewolf game to have in your collection." - Luis Diaz
"The ultimate version of the ultimate party game. Contains over 40 different roles and supports up to 64 players." - Boris
"This is indeed the Ultimate version. It doesn't get any better. Must buy for everybody who likes the werewolves game." - Kristof Tersago
"I started with Werewolves of Miller's Hollow and recently upgraded to this Ultimate edition. This is THE werewolf game to buy. Having character descriptions written ON the cards is a moderator life saver. FORTY great roles to play with and a balancing system ON the cards for moderators to build a great experience. The rule book is full of great ideas. I LOVE this edition of werewolf." - James Williams
"I rate regular Werewolf a 9.5. Ultimate Werewolf gets a 10 because it is .5 better than every other edition. Ha ha. It's actually 100 times better than any other published edition and the only one you should consider purchasing." - Karl Schmit
"I really like the rulebook, which gives the best explanation I've seen of how to play and how to maximize the fun of the game. I also really like the wide variety of roles, which provide for a lot of replayability." - Jonathan Takagi
"It's hard for me to justify the purchase of a game you can make for free, but Ultimate Werewolf is worth every penny. The game is well produced and the rules are just great." - Ryan McSwain

Recommendation

So is Ultimate Werewolf: Ultimate Edition for you? Werewolf is a modern game that needs little to recommend it in view of its widespread success. Although we are seeing some newer social deduction games that avoid player elimination, Werewolf's popularity is still going strong, and there are few social games that work better when you have a group of over a dozen players.

Given that there were already some commercial editions of Werewolf on the market when this first appeared, was another edition really necessary? It takes a brave soul to market a game as the "ultimate edition". But Ted Alspach is such a brave soul, and as an ardent Werewolf enthusiast he set himself the lofty goal of making this the best version of Werewolf possible. Few would argue that he hasn't succeeded. It's a fantastic edition, and Ted deserves much praise for the love and effort he has poured into this edition. The rulebook deserves special mention, and is easily the best handbook to Werewolf one can find in print. Even if you already have one of the other editions of Werewolf, there's more than enough goodies here to justify picking this up, especially if you're a real fan of the game.

If you're new to Werewolf, then this edition of the game will tell you all you need to know in order to get started, and leave you well equipped to ensure that your first games are a success. And if you're a seasoned veteran, you're almost certain to love the sheer amount of variety in the different character cards, as well as the scenarios, tips for successful moderating, and other terrific content in the rulebook. Regardless of your experience, if you want to play Werewolf, then this is the absolutely the edition you should get. Thank you Mr Ted Alspach, this really is the ultimate edition!



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
mb The complete list of Ender's pictorial reviews: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/37596

Subscribe to this list to be notified when new reviews are posted.

If you made it to the end of this review and found it helpful, please considering giving a thumbs up at the very top of the article, to let me know you were here, and to give others a better chance of seeing it.
86 
 Thumb up
1.50
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dan Edelen
United States
Mount Orab
Ohio
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I can't speak for everyone, but I think this is about as thorough an overview as any game could wish for.

Really, Ender, where do you find the time?
13 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Luis Diaz
United States
Miami
Florida
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Well done, Ender. Excellent review.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tom
United States
Plainfield
ILLINOIS
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Great review as always! This is one of these game I never want to play and yet I respect it immensely and completely understand the massive cult following it has. 3:00am at Gen con and you can bet there are several groups playing this game all night long. It never ceases to amaze me just how powerful this game is in regards to attracting a very strong following. Too bad it is not my thing.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jens Kunst
Netherlands
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Wow. I'm totally switching to Ultimate...
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jack Spirio
Austria
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I never understood, why they didn't add Text on the cards. Thanks GIF, someone used his brain while creating the later editions
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Blair
Canada
Winnipeg
Manitoba
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
edelen wrote:
I can't speak for everyone, but I think this is about as thorough an overview as any game could wish for.

Really, Ender, where do you find the time?


Yes, it's the ultimate review for this game. Well done.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tom Thingamagummy
United States
Oakland
California
flag msg tools
Don't make me bust out the drama!!
badge
Panda is a Werewolf. The Village wins!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Jack Spirio wrote:
I never understood, why they didn't add Text on the cards. Thanks GIF, someone used his brain while creating the later editions


It's funny - I have the opposite reaction. I actually prefer it didn't have the text. We have a group that likes to create a lot of unique roles and play complex games. We playtest a bunch. So we don't always use the roles in the way the card text is printed.

Still, I think this version is still the best one out there.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Graham Smallwood
United States
Santa Ana
California
flag msg tools
badge
TWO Equals in an "if" statement!!!
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
"Whitebox Edition (2007)" is a bad link, so ya know.

Is my Whitebox worth a million dollars now?
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Dorque wrote:
"Whitebox Edition (2007)" is a bad link, so ya know.

Link fixed - thanks for pointing that out!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jack Spirio
Austria
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
arkibet wrote:
Jack Spirio wrote:
I never understood, why they didn't add Text on the cards. Thanks GIF, someone used his brain while creating the later editions


It's funny - I have the opposite reaction. I actually prefer it didn't have the text. We have a group that likes to create a lot of unique roles and play complex games. We playtest a bunch. So we don't always use the roles in the way the card text is printed.

Still, I think this version is still the best one out there.


If you play a few Times you don't need Text on cards. But I played a lot with ne players, and you had to explane each rolle a few Timers because they forgot what they role meant. So if there would be Text, you could just Look one your and Remember.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Jack Spirio wrote:
If you play a few Times you don't need Text on cards. But I played a lot with ne players, and you had to explane each rolle a few Timers because they forgot what they role meant. So if there would be Text, you could just Look one your and Remember.

Having explanatory text on the cards is perfect for new players, as you say.

However very experienced Werewolf players sometimes use character roles with the same names that work slightly differently than Ted's. See the posts following this one for some examples.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.