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Subject: Fire Frenzy! First attempt rss

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Zoe M
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This was played as part of July’s solitaire challenge, Fire Frenzy, run by Malaiser.



With five initial explosions, there was plenty of damage on the board to begin with. So of course, my first thought was to chop some holes in the walls.

Those two POIs in the southeast bedroom were just too tempting. They were just a couple of spaces from a potential ambulance spot, if only that inconvenient wall weren’t in the way. Clearly, the wall had to go. I positioned the Rescue Specialist and the Ambulance accordingly.

The placement of the fire engine was easy, since two explosions had filled the pink bedroom with flames, and there was more fire in the hall above. This seemed like a job for the Driver/Operator.

The rest of the fire was concentrated in the NE quadrant, so I wanted my third firefighter up there. Again, the ranch house was inconveniently short of doors, but some of the walls in the area were already damaged, so I didn’t feel very bad about chopping through again. The fire was far enough away from the other possible entrances that I figured I’d end up with holes there regardless, from explosions if not from chopping.

In retrospect, I think I should have started the blue firefirefighter on the north side rather than the east side, in case I wanted to evacuate anyone via that ambulance space. But I was too busy thinking about whether he should be the CAFS or the Generalist. There was lots of fire on the board, so I wasn’t worried about the CAFS having nothing to do. But there might come a point when I wanted to focus more on evacuating victims, and the Generalist would be much more helpful then. In this game, there would be no changing roles once I started.

I eventually decided on the CAFS, and I think it worked out pretty well—I’m going to keep this same team of firefighters when I play the challenge again. I chose the starting turn order based on how much fire everyone would be putting out: first Driver/Operator, then CAFS, then Rescue Specialist.



The Driver/Operator got off to a good start, quickly eliminating all the fire in the pink bedroom.



The CAFS behaved exactly as expected, chopping through the wall to extinguish one fire and turn another to smoke.



It was only on the Rescue Specialist’s turn that the situation deviated a bit from the plan. That convenient POI closest to the ambulance turned out to be a false alarm, and when I immediately rolled again to place a new POI, its location was less than ideal.



The firefighters were still at the edges of the building, with no immediate prospect of getting in to the blue bathroom. Even the Rescue Specialist was cut off by several fires separating her from the victim. That poor person, if it was a person, was just going to have to languish there among the flames for several rounds, always at risk of immediate death.

On the bright side, the next POI that the Rescue Specialist encountered really was a victim, and was just a few spots from the ambulance.

Now we were back to the Driver/Operator, who was somewhat at a loss after his first successful shots. As usual, there was no convenient entrance to the house, and he wasn’t close enough to the action to justify chopping through the wall. Ultimately, he decided to drive around to the west side of the house and fire the deck gun again, hoping to get some of the fire in the hall or even one of the smokes that had popped up in the entryway. Unfortunately, he accomplished nothing.

Still, the situation wasn’t looking too bad. By the end of the round, the CAFS had dealt with the fire in the NE bedroom and the Rescue Specialist had evacuated the first victim into the ambulance. The edges of the the house were looking nice and calm, while fire raged in the middle.



Again, the Driver/Operator wasn’t quite sure how he could be of service, but the CAFS had plenty to do.



Too bad about that smoke on the hazmat.



It was up to the Rescue Specialist to stage a daring rescue from the Ambulance.



Fortunately, she had two saved actions. Unfortunately, that still didn’t seem to be enough. She could walk into the flames and extinguish the smoke on the hazmat—but that would be suicide, which was frowned on in the fire department regulations.

Ultimately, she concluded that her best course of action would be to extinguish the fire just south of the CAFS, which at least meant that a roll of that particular spot wouldn’t result in an explosion of the hazmat, death for the POI, and removal of the CAFS from his critical firefighting position.



As for the rest, she just had to hope and pray that the next two rolls would go smoothly.

It was tense for a while, but the CAFS did get another turn without disaster striking. And thanks in part to his one saved AP, the situation looked a whole lot better after that.



In fact, the board as a whole was looking pretty nice. I hadn’t rolled any hotspots yet, and all the fire had been reduced to smoke. One victim had already been rescued.



And then somehow this happened:



Three victims had been rescued, nine new hotspots had been added to the board, and the fire was starting to rage out of control again.

That’s when the Driver/Operator remembered that he had some special training that could be handy in just this situation. He was only a few steps from the truck, so he rushed back in and fired off a shot of the deck gun—which missed completely.

Meanwhile, the Rescue Specialist saved the fourth victim, and headed back into the building to check on a new POI that had appeared. It was a real person too, but she barely had time to glance at him before jumping out of the quadrant so that the Driver/Operator could fire again.

The CAFS calmly went about his business, again putting saved action points to good use and making up for his inactivity on the previous turn. And the Driver/Operator aimed more successfully this time, putting out the majority of the flames in the kitchen. Again, things seemed to be relatively under control.



Of course, nothing can really be under control when there are 19 hotspots on the board and more on the way. Every moment of calm was just a temporary respite. There was enough time to get another victim out of the way, but soon the inevitable happened: another explosion.



As explosions go, it was pretty minor: no deaths, no knockdowns, no flashovers of huge areas of smoke. But it did three damage to the house, and that pile of damage cubes was suddenly looking pretty small:



And of course, that same space promptly exploded again, just before the CAFS could get there.



On the bright side, the POI lost in the explosion turned out to be a false alarm. On the gloomy side, the house was now in imminent danger of collapse.



I thought about giving up right then, not for the first time. I had managed to rescue 8 victims, and might just lose points for damage by continuing. But a similar thought had crossed my mind at 7, and I had managed to get one more victim out after that point, so why not press on? And the ninth victim was so close. It would just take one more round for the Driver/Operator and Rescue Specialist to carry him out together.

Unfortunately, that one more round was not to be. This is what happens when there are 23 hotspots on the board: the bottom right corner caught fire and exploded on the same turn, bringing down the building on the firefighters and the victims inside.



In this case, I would have been better off stopping while I was ahead, but I can’t really be disappointed with the result. I’m going to try again with the same team of firefighters and essentially the same starting positions, possibly replacing the CAFS with the Generalist for my third game. For now, my score is as follows:

Win: 10 points
Victims saved: 80 points
Hazmats saved: 0 points
Damage cubes remaining: 0 points

Total: 90
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Brandon James
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Richardson
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Looks like a lot of fun Where's this Fire Frenzy solo challenge at?

I only started playing the game a couple of weeks ago. How did you get so many hotspots? I thought those were only generated by hazmats when they explode?

And one more question.. what is your scoring based on?
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Zeddy
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wwbjd wrote:
Looks like a lot of fun Where's this Fire Frenzy solo challenge at?

I only started playing the game a couple of weeks ago. How did you get so many hotspots? I thought those were only generated by hazmats when they explode?

And one more question.. what is your scoring based on?


July 2014 - Flash Point Solitaire Challenge: Fire Frenzy!

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Zoe M
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The challenge is here: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/1196154/july-2014-flash-...

I hope you like it!

There are a lot of rule variants just for this challenge. But in a normal experienced game, you start with one hotspot on each initial explosion, and also three or four other hotspots at random. There's also a supply of 6-12 hotspots on the side of the board, and every time you roll a hotspot you ultimately add another one.

I think the scoring was inspired by the Flash Point Fire Academy challenge.
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Ryan Mayes
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Gilbert
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Great write up Zoë! I love to see the challenges spread out from the 1 Player guild.
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Zoe M
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Thanks, Ryan!
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