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Tom Vasel
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Well, the number one topic when talking about Emira (Mayfair and Phalanx Games, 2006 - Liesbeth Vanzeir and Paul Van Hove) is going to be its theme. "Which Sheik will attract the Princess?" asks the cover, and indeed, the game is about players acting as sheiks to attempt to finish up their harem as quickly as possible. From the provocative cover to the mechanics of the game (women throw themselves at the sheiks for shallow reasons), someone is bound to be offended by it. It certainly is a unique theme, but what about the gameplay?

Setting aside the theme, which really does work with the game's mechanics, I find Emira to be a very enjoyable game. It has the appearance of an auction game, and indeed there are many auctions in the game; but there is more to it than that, with a "building" feeling to it. The theme made me a bit uncomfortable (although I laughed at it several times), and might turn some away; but for those who don't mind (or like the theme), Emira is a fresh feeling, intriguing game. It might go on a bit long for some folk, but it's a fulfilling, fun game and stands out against many blasé games that have been produced this year.

A board is placed on the table which holds a deck of Emira cards, status cards, and has places to put several other tokens. Camel tokens, palace section tokens, appearance "+1" tokens, and small and large supply pieces are placed in piles next to the board, while decks are shuffled and placed in the correct spaces. A pile of gold pieces and a deck of event cards are also placed on the table (with each player taking 750 gold). A pile of appearance counters are mixed into a bag - being of three types: beauty, manners, and attire. Each player takes a player board of a random color (each color starts with a different advantage). These boards have eight spaces on the bottom for palace sections, four spice supply tracks on the side, boxes for appearance counters in the middle, and an oasis spot for camels on the other side. A token of that player's color is placed on the first space ("50") of the camel track. Several goal cards are shuffled, and one is secretly dealt to each player. Each player is also given three event cards, of which they may keep one. One player is given the first player marker, and the game is ready to begin.

In each round, players first have the opportunity to play one event card, going in player order. Players then receive their permanent income, which is printed on their card (usually 250 gold), and any income from their spice trade tracks, moving each of them one space to the right. The top Emira card is flipped over, showing the princess who is to be wooed this round. Each princess shows two things that she is looking for in a man, with one of them the dominant trait. The top status card is flipped face up, and one palace section tile, one camel tile, and one small and large spice caravan tokens are placed on the main board as well as a random appearance token from the bag.

A bidding phase then begins, starting with the first person. Players bid until all but one player pass, who must pay their bid to the bank and choose one of the available actions (each action can only be chosen once). The actions are:
- Buy a Camel: For 150 gold, a player can buy the available camel token. In future auctions, players pay 50 less gold for winning an auction for each camel they have. The amount of gold per camel can be changed by some event cards.
- Buy a Palace Section: For 500 gold, the player can buy the available palace section and add it to their palace.
- Improve your Status: For the amount of gold shown on the status card, the player can buy it, improving their status by "1" to "3", as directed on the card.
- Improve you Appearance: For 350 gold, the player may buy the appearance tile available. As soon as a player gets one of each of the three types of appearance tiles, they take a "+1" appearance token and place it on their card.
- Buy a Small Spice Caravan: A player may take the small spice caravan and place it on their "slow" track (which costs 450 gold, but pays them 150 gold for the next eight turns), or the "fast" track (which costs 550 gold, and pays them 300 gold for the next four turns).
- Buy a Large Spice Caravan: A player may take the large spice caravan and place it on their "slow" track (which costs 750 gold, but pays them 250 gold for the next eight turns), or the "fast" track (which costs 900 gold, and plays them 500 gold for the next four turns).

Once a player takes an action, they are out of all future auctions, until each player has taken one action. Players are free to pass and take no action and can even take 150 gold from the bank if they meet some requirements that prove they are fairly poor. At this point, the princess who is face up decides which sheik she is going to live with. First, only sheiks who have enough room are considered (each sheik can support up to two princesses, plus one for each palace section they have). Then, amongst these sheiks, whoever has the highest amount of whatever the princess desires (money, largest house, "+1" appearance tokens, or status) gets the princess. If there is a tie, then the secondary desire of the princess is examined. If there is still a tie, then the princess goes to an "undecided" pile, which she leaves the moment the tie is broken.

All players must then pay 50 gold coins for each princess in their house, or else one of them will randomly leave; and then first player passes to the person to the current starter's right, and another round begins.

Some of the princesses provide bonuses or negative modifiers (some give a "+1" status, others require 100 gold coins for upkeep, etc.). Each princess also has one or two abilities (such as singing, romance, cooking, etc.). As soon as a player meets one of the two requirements on their goal card (get a certain amount of princesses, or get a smaller amount but with a certain number of abilities), they win the game.

Some comments on the game…

1.) Theme: Let's get this out of the way in the beginning, since it's certainly going to be a conversational point with gaming groups, if nothing else. Despite the fact that harems were a historical reality, and despite the fact that the game tones down on the theme quite a bit (and even goes against it to a degree, by having the women choose the sheiks, and not the other way around), this game is going to offend folks. Not everyone will be offended, to be sure, and the game is fairly tasteful in portraying what could have been rather lewd. Some folks found the game distasteful, others found the game hilarious, and indeed we made jokes about the gameplay as it went on. Still, like another reviewer stated, the theme made me uncomfortable, and the provocative cover doesn’t help much. I didn't even attempt to play the game with my teenagers and can think of other situations where it wouldn't work very well. Still, the theme does fit the mechanics well (the only alternative I thought of was attracting friends in high school), and each person will have to decide for themselves whether or not they should play the game.

2.) Components: Emira comes chock full of components in its plastic insert. Piles of different cards (differentiated by different color backs, counters, player boards, and more all come packed in, and setup actually takes a little while. The counters are of high quality and have excellent artwork on them, as well as the cards. The money is sometimes easily confused (as all denominations use the same color), but that's necessary since players can usually keep it hidden. Everything fits on the player boards well, and I can see at a glance what my opponents have. A couple niggling problems are evident: I'm not sure why the main game board doesn't have a place for event cards when it has room for all other cards; and the caravan tokens are cylinders, which keep falling over - why didn't they use cubes? Still, these are minor - and the way everything works together, especially the player boards, is well handled. Everything fits inside the typical sized box, and very few plastic bags are needed.

3.) Rules: I was a bit overwhelmed by the twelve page rulebook with a LOT of text when I first read it and actually had to set the game up to get a full grasp of what was going on. It's full of illustrations and explanations; but there is a lot going on, so new players may be confused, especially since princesses start moving on the very first turn. Once the game goes for a few rounds, everything becomes evident; so I usually play the game a little to teach it to new players.

4.) Money: Money is used to auction with in the game, although some players find that deliberately passing on all auctions keeps their money supply higher. I personally enjoyed the camel feature, and how it inflates the cost of auctions. Some may find this artificial and forced, but it allows a player to go first with little opposition, which causes camels to have an increased value. I wasn't so fond of the fact that the only way to increase the value of individual camels was through an event card, that one only got by luck of the draw, but found that it wasn't as powerful as I thought. One interesting money mechanic is the annoying upkeep of the princesses. If a player gets two or three princesses quickly, they can find themselves struggling to stay afloat monetarily. The caravans will help a player, but cost initial money to begin with, and keep the player from choosing other, sometimes more important options.

5.) Choices: To me, Emira is a game about choosing, rather than auctions. Yes, the auctions determine who gets to choose first, but the amount of money a player has to spend is often just as determining a factor. Status cards are sold for a varying price and are often the most contested feature; while appearance takes a while to increase, as a player has to buy three different tiles to increase it by one. A few of the shallow princesses are attracted by money, so sometimes the best choice is no choice, as players simply increase their cash on hand. The building option is necessary, as players need to increase their palace size to add more princesses, but is costly, at 500 gold coins a section. I found the choices in increasing one's stature to be fascinatingly interesting and the best part of the game.

6.) Princess: One small drawback is that players have to plan what they are doing, and then hope that the princesses will fall in line. It's a bit annoying to have a princess come to you who has a negative modifier, and there's no really easy way to get rid of her (other than to not pay upkeep, and hope she's the one who randomly runs away). Each turn a new princess is turned over, and players adjust their tactics accordingly. I've seen some variants on the 'net in which players turn princesses over a turn ahead of time, allowing players to work towards a goal - and I'm not sure that's a bad idea. For now, players have to work towards a goal of their choosing and hope that the princesses fall in line. There is a fairly even amount of princesses who are attracted by each feature, so odds are that you'll get your women eventually. (I'm having a hard time typing some of this with a straight face.)

7.) Events: At the end of each turn, players can pay 150 gold to buy two event cards (picking one) or 250 gold to buy three (still only keeping one). This is an interesting mechanic, as some of the event cards can be really helpful for your specific strategy, while it also can be a waste of money if you don't get any cards you need. I've found that the 250 gold is usually not worth the one extra choice, but I like the event cards enough to throw away the cash whenever I get a chance.

8.) Fun Factor: Setting aside the theme, which will probably contribute to/detract from the fun for many players, I enjoyed the aspect of building up my features. It's hard to decide what to do, as you simply don't have time to increase everything - but must choose what is more important. I've simply concentrated on one aspect (such as having a huge house), and hope that it brings in the winning combination; but I've also lost every game I've played, also. But even in the losing, I've had a lot of fun, so I know the game is good.

Emira is considered long by some - at two or so hours - although I found it engrossing the entire time. Others will be turned off/on by the theme. But taken for what it is, there is no denying that the theme helps the game mechanics make sense, and the way players build up - especially with the clever money making mechanic of the caravans (choose the slower ones!) is something I enjoy. Will I play it often? That is a question I don't have an answer for, as the theme keeps it from coming out more than it should. But the delightful time I had playing also is tugging at me, and we'll have to wait until the future to see whether the theme beats out the mechanics.

Tom Vasel
"Real men play board games"
www.tomvasel.com
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Maarten D. de Jong
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Nice review (as per usual), but quite frankly, I think your emphasis on the 'controversial' nature of the theme skews the entire text more than it should. You mention the 'provocative' cover, you mention 'feeling uncomfortable', you mention 'people might take offense', you even mention 'not playing this with your teenagers', and you finish the review by concluding that the 'theme keeps this game from coming out more than it should'. There must be a dozen different ways in which you directly or indirectly show your distaste; you go as far as to decrease the game's rating because of it. That's quite a lot of negativity for a reviewer who is hard-pressed to find faults with any game he is presented with.

I won't ask why you feel all those things: it is not relevant for what I'm about to ask, and I'd probably disagree with you from the start anyway. Nevertheless, after reading I get the distinct impression you really didn't want to review this game, nor play it, nor even be in the same room with it. May I ask why you bothered in the first place?
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Tom Vasel
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I mentioned the controversial nature of the theme so often because it comes up with so many people that I've shown the game to / played the game with. Some women were frankly offended, and others stated that they couldn't believe the theme was there. I'm actually a bit more mild than that, although the theme did make me uncomfortable. Why did I play it? Well, it was a review copy, AND the rules really intrigued me. It's a fun game! But the theme will affect a myriad of places that it can't be played (school, church, etc.)
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Maarten D. de Jong
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Perhaps, perhaps not. Thank you for answering, and here's to your next game which you will enjoy the theme of .
 
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J.M. Diller
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Perhaps, perhaps not? What does that mean? If you referring to Tom's last statement, don't be silly. Of course the theme is going to stop many(if not all) people from playing it at school or church. I think you're trying to sound clever, but realistically, a theme can limit a game somewhat.
 
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Mike Siggins
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Hi Tom

I am really not getting this theme thing. The women are making the choices here. So you object to what the historical existence of harems and drawing the line because why?

 
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Patrik Strömer
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This is rather silly!

I mean, it is OK to play games where you kill each other? And that is NOT controversial, or?

Did I miss something here? I thought "Make love, not war" was an american slogan...

/Strömer, from Sweden
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Maciej Teległow
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I do not think theme of the game would be a problem to anyone here in Europe. For me it is a very big plus. It is exotic, colorfull and little spicy in a very good way, which can bring some humor to the table. And, if You know what i mean, it is very realistic
For me, plus one point just for the theme!!!
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Stephen Gassett
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Personally, I think it says something for a game when the theme can (apparently) offend so many, but still receive accolades and earn repeated praise (and plays). Emira is at the very top of my 'next game purchases' list, and I look forward to playing it with great anticipation.

These days, everyone tries to be as PC as possible, but sometimes it's nice to give it a rest and just have fun and laugh at a game.
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Stephen Gassett
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Totally agree. Our lopsided view of reality in America - where nudity is a no-no but violence doesn't raise an eyebrow - is exactly the reason why there are so many sickos in our society.
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Laura Appelbaum
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I am a woman, and a proud feminist, and I thoroughly enjoyed my first game of Emira, as did the other woman playing, my husband, and a single male friend also playing. We found Emira humorous, enjoyable, beautiful and challenging. If the theme were handled more "realistically" and the women were merely treated as objects by the sheiks, the theme of game would indeed have turned me off and I might not have tried it out -- real world polygamy is *not* something I approve of under any circumstances no matter how much someone may try to argue that a man can't take another wife without the previous wife/wives consent, yadda, yadda, yadda. But the nature of the way Emira has been written quite clearly takes the game into a pleasant fantasy realm alot better than say, Puerto Rico deals with slavery by calling the brown workers "colonists." If you are someone who won't play PR because of slavery, then you won't play Emira because of well, sex slavery. But if you can pretend that all those people being packed onto a single ship and passed around the various players are there by choice, you will have no problem making believe that each successive wife in Emira decides of her own free will that she wants to live in a particular household.

In short, I feel safe recommending Emira to the majority of gamers, female and male. It's a fantasy game about a fantasy world where men and women have equal kinds of powers but, yeah, the men are building harems. (I also don't think, BTW, it is appropriate to "dis" the minority of people who won't even play a game that doesn't mirror their real life morality. I might, however, suggest to those adults, that they consider playing a game like Emira as an educational experience with their kids -- I can see all kinds of game-theme related discussions that might come up during or after playing a fun game -- the nature of gender roles, for instance, or how can it be that there are still so many millions of people around the world who truly perceive half of the human race as mere chattle? Are we all aware of the many forms of slavery still in active existance around the world that are "given a pass" in so many contries on the basis of "well,it's just our tradition" and what is the obligation of individuals and governments to take in response to those situations? On this theme, to quote Gnarls Barkley "I could go on and on and on and on ... but who cares!?" ;D

I look forward to playing Emira again. Perhaps then I will win the lovely Layla, about whom I have heard so many songs and poems ...
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Peter Marchlewitz
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Apocryphile wrote:
Totally agree. Our lopsided view of reality in America - where nudity is a no-no but violence doesn't raise an eyebrow - is exactly the reason why there are so many sickos in our society.



I agree.
 
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Chris Farrell
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I think saying Emira's theme is going to limit its appeal is simplistic. Many people are also going to be drawn to its whimsical theme who wouldn't bother with another dusty Colovini/Schacht game, so is it a net limitation or a net plus? Who knows? It's not a "limitation", it just is.

The relevant question is, is the theme well done? I think it is. Is there anything objectionable about the fundamental gameplay? Not for the vast majority of people - nobody's being coerced, oppressed, killed, exploited, or any other serious unpleasentness. Beyond that, the purchaser him/herself will be more than able to make the value judgement on whether they like it or not, so I'd suggest we not harp on it.

I have no doubts that the theme of Emira will turn people away from it. But people are also turned away from abstracts because they don't have theme.
 
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fabrice vandenbogaerde
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I really don't think the designers of the game had the intention of provocating people. Certenly not because it was designed by a woman and a man. Also, the theme can't be more realistic. Boy's we live in a world where women choose men and that's the only truth. (unless there are still men that believe they chose their women) It's indeed true that the game will not be played in a church, but on the other hand, we never play games in a church so I really don't see the problem. If there are people who don't play the game because of the theme, than it's there mistake and not that of the designers!
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P C
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Hi, it is the first time I participate to this forum.
As a playtester of the game, I must say (but you certainly know it already) that the game has been modified in order to better match the American market, to the great disappointment of the authors, their friends and the playtesters. Originally, one of the characteristics of the women was high libido and not romance. The players got money from oil, and not from spice trade. Oil is apparently too hot as a topic ! Don't you guess why ? It was not a white knight who came to take one of your women, but a lesbian.
Even so, there was no explicit sex scene that could offense children. Harems are historical (not only historical, actually) reality. Why should not we speak about and play with ? Even if the sheiks would have to chose women in the game, then what ? It is only a game! This makes me think on the former Soviet Union where Monopoly was forbidden. It is not because you play Emira that you are a supporter of harems.
My son (12-year-old) plays Emira with us, and does not care about the theme. We explained him what harems are, explained that it is not like that here in our society, and so what? He has learned something, learned that society is not the same everywhere, learned that people may live differently in other countries, which is the reality. It was the opportunity to speak about the evolution of woman's rights, which they also learn at school. For the rest, it is a game.
Don't you find offending all those games where you have to kill others to win, destroy their world, or things like that ? When you compare, harems are very smooth and kind.
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Jim Cote
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Well said, Pascal!
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Seth Jaffee
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cfarrell wrote:
I think saying Emira's theme is going to limit its appeal is simplistic. Many people are also going to be drawn to its whimsical theme who wouldn't bother with another dusty Colovini/Schacht game, so is it a net limitation or a net plus? Who knows? It's not a "limitation", it just is.

Well said. Any games theme will limit the game's appeal.
 
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Andrea Pasquinelli
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Quote:
while appearance takes a while to increase, as a player has to buy three different tiles to increase it by one.


i think there is a misunderstand: my rulebook says every appearance tile gives you an appearance point. If you collect 3 different kind of appearance tiles you get an extra point in appearance.
 
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P C
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I do confirm.
You get 1 appearance point for 1 tile. If you collect 3 different appearance tiles, you get a bonus of 1 appearance point. You can cumulate this: if you collect again 3 different appearance tiles, you get again the bonus.
 
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Christopher DeFrisco
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Ah, negative. I am a meat popsicle.
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I couldn't agree with Pascal more! I have always percieved my country (US) as sophmoric and the European world as mature. Too bad we adolescent Americans can't handle the intended version of the game. shake
 
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Mark Bigney
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In defense of Mr. Vasel
I think Mr. Vasel made (or was trying to make) two kinds of statements: some objective ones and some subjective ones.
He stated some people will be put off by or offended by the theme. This is undeniably true, can be backed up with evidence, and is furthermore intuitively obvious.
The second set of statements related to Mr. Vasel's discomfort with the theme. These were made respectfully, without casting aspersions on anyone involved with the production of the game, nor on anyone who is not put off by the theme.
That Mr. Vasel has not made similar comments about, say, Memoir '44 is not quite as relevant as people have made it out to be. Yes, many people I know of refuse to play Memoir on various grounds; they'll never play as the Reichswehr, object to games with violence, are strict anti-war pacifists, or have a personal/family connection to WWII that they don't ant trivialized, etc. When they write about Memoir (probably not full reviews, but whatever) they are free to express their reservations, so long as they do them as respectfully. It is not Mr. Vasel's duty when writing reviews to account for any reservations of people who are not Tom. Tom wrote this review, and he shared Tom's impressions--without denigrating anyone or anything.
It doesn't matter if harems are historical and/or actual (parenthetically, you can't have it both ways; either the game is about owning women and is thus representative, or is about becoming attractive to women and is fantasist. I'm surprised this hasn't come up) or not.
And please, comments about the United States being juvenile and Europe sophisticated are neither appropriate nor helpful.
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D. Quinn Nix
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Pascalito wrote:
...the game has been modified in order to better match the American market, to the great disappointment of the authors, their friends and the playtesters. Originally, one of the characteristics of the women was high libido and not romance. The players got money from oil, and not from spice trade. Oil is apparently too hot as a topic ! Don't you guess why ? It was not a white knight who came to take one of your women, but a lesbian.

Even so, there was no explicit sex scene that could offense children. Harems are historical (not only historical, actually) reality. Why should not we speak about and play with ? Even if the sheiks would have to chose women in the game, then what ? It is only a game!

Agreed. And if I was going to play a board game about managing a harem (which certainly sounds intriguing, to me), then I'd want the stuff put back into it that Pascalito says was taken out. Otherwise, I'd rather play some other board game, one that is more faithful to its theme.

BTW: I was initially interested in buying Emira, due to its exotic and intriguing theme, and its beautiful components. But now that I know it's been overly toned down and homogenized for the American market, I will pass.

The old saying is true: "When you try pleasing everyone, you end up pleasing no one."
 
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Done playin'... Logan... done playin'...
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Bergbau wrote:
This is rather silly!

I mean, it is OK to play games where you kill each other? And that is NOT controversial, or?

Did I miss something here? I thought "Make love, not war" was an american slogan...

/Strömer, from Sweden


Exactly! Why is it okay to play a WWII game, hoping Hitler might even win it, but not okay to play an innocent game about Harems... Which - as even the publisher point out in the rules on page 2 - is meant satirical and emancipated from the beginning. I feel you should mention that as well. I bought the game on Essen, and I know we will have a good time with it. Theme- and mechanic wise.
 
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Done playin'... Logan... done playin'...
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Apocryphile wrote:
Totally agree. Our lopsided view of reality in America - where nudity is a no-no but violence doesn't raise an eyebrow - is exactly the reason why there are so many sickos in our society.


It wouldn't be okay for a Dutch person to say this... but coming from an American, I 100% agree to what is said here.
 
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Ian Allen
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Oh nooo - I just read the word harem and now I have to go capture some women and make them my sex slaves! Damn that game, it just ruined my life ...!!
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