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Stonewall's Sword: The Battle of Cedar Mountain» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Detailed review, with brief AAR rss

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Eric Stubbs
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Hi all! I wanted to take the time to review Stonewall’s Sword, the first in a new system of games for Civil War battles. To begin with, two caveats so that you know where I’m coming from: this is my first Civil War tactical game (or at least the first in many years), and I’m no scholar of the period. My review and thoughts are based on a solo play of the intro scenario and a solo play of the full scenario with all optional rules.

Also, please forgive any looseness in the rules explanations, I was aiming to capture them but not get too deep into the particulars.

With that said, I’ll start off with a brief narrative of the full scenario I played, and then get into the review.

Cedar Mountain as it might have been:
Banks ordered his men forward aggressively, and Crawford and Gordon’s brigades swung around and came in on the Confederate left flank while Prince and Greene kept Early pinned on the right and Geary maintained a line in the center. Garnett’s men dealt Crawford a check from which he took quite a while to recover, but Gordon’s two strong regiments proved unstoppable and drove the Southern forces before them. Jackson soon became aware of the danger and focused his men’s efforts; on the Union side, Ricketts started to march, his lead units arriving in the late afternoon. Confederate reinforcements under A.P. Hill got caught up in a traffic jam and had minimal luck pushing back the stubborn Gordon, after which they came under fresh assault by a resurgent Crawford later in the day. However, the wounding of division leader Williams led to a breakdown in command, and Gordon and Crawford ended up separated from Geary and in an exposed position, unable to make any further headway.

Meanwhile, on the Confederate right, Prince’s men were gradually chewed up by Forno and Early’s brigades (that it didn’t go worse for Prince and Green was due to confused orders and the Federal artillery overlooking the cornfield), and attacks by two of Ricketts’ brigades did not make much headway in the center, owing to ferocious counter-attacks by Pender’s brigade. As the sun set, Thomas, Pender, and Early continued their attacks on the Union left and center, driving back the Federals and inflicting casualties, particularly on Duryea’s brigade. Ricketts’ men staged a general slow withdrawal. As night fell, the two sides were forced to stop fighting, and Gordon and Crawford would be able to pull back from their dangerous situation under cover of darkness. Nonetheless, Union casualties were not high, and they had held on long enough to count the engagement as a substantial victory for them, albeit somewhat more due to embarrassing Jackson than by actually defeating him, since Confederate casualties were also not particularly severe.

In game terms, the Union secured two VP hexes early and held them for the entire game, racking up VPs every turn. At the end, they had more strength points on the broken track than the Confederates did, but they still won a major victory.


Review:

In brief:
I found this to be an excellent game, with a spectacular emergent narrative that’s particularly important for me as a solo wargamer. I had previously been shying away from Civil War tactical games due to the high complexity, and this hits the sweet spot for me in terms of rules overhead: not too much, not too little, with certain elements abstracted out in an elegant way. After I finished the full game, I was sorely tempted to set it up for another go; I refrained only because I wanted to give some other games a chance, but this will definitely be back to my table. I’m also quite looking forward to Hammerin’ Sickles, the next game in this system, which is on the GMT P500 list, and any other battles the designer wants to model. Finally, the game led me to read about the battle and want to visit it (I live close enough to it that this is feasible) and got me interested again in Civil War history. Read on for more details!

Please note that italicized text below indicates questions I have for the designer, or general comments.

Components:
The game package is very well put-together and attractive. The counters are great quality and were easy to punch, the rule book is sturdy, the player aids cover most of what you need to play and are printed on solid cardstock, and the map is a true work of art that really captures the era. All of this comes at quite a favorable price point.

Rules and game flow:
I found the rules clearly written, with good examples, solid, and intuitive, by which I mean that they made sense in terms of what the designer wants to achieve; they connect well with what he aims to model, namely the fog and chaos of the battlefield. The chit-pull system is a great fit for this, and there are a few types of chits: Division leader chits which allow brigades to be activated, Commander in Chief (CiC) chits which allow any brigade of that side to be activated for free (so a brigade can act twice in one turn), event chits that provide different options to each side (e.g. Rebel Yell to move and initiate a close combat with a bonus, Brigade Reserve Movement to allow Union troops a free move), and two chaos chits: Fog of War, which triggers a die roll that can cause uncontrolled advances/retreats or commander casualties, and Fortunes of War, which negates the next chit to be drawn.

At the start of every turn, each side chooses (secretly, unless you’re playing solo) one of their event chits to go into the draw cup. The others are flipped over and two are chosen to be left out of the draw cup. The rest go in the cup along with the division leader chits, any active CiC chits, Fog of War, and Fortunes of War.

Once that’s done, you do the artillery/cavalry phase, in which each side’s artillery and the lone Union cavalry unit take turns either moving or firing. A separate phase for this felt a bit artificial to me and I was curious to know more about the design decisions behind it.

The main part of each turn then begins: you draw a chit from the cup and look at it. If it’s an event chit, it might happen immediately or the side might decide to hold onto it. If it’s a Fog of War chit, you roll a die and apply the effects. Fortunes of War I’ve already mentioned. If it’s a division leader chit, you first roll a D6 and compare the roll to the number printed counter: equal or lower, and one of the brigade’s under that division leader can activate under one of a few orders: Attack, Defend, Maneuver, Regroup, which have different benefits and drawbacks (note that one of the event chits is Command Confusion, which triggers a die roll for the brigade to get different orders). Roll higher than the number on the counter, and one brigade’s units can only shoot at enemy units right next to them, since it didn’t get proper orders. I found this mechanism to be an effective abstraction of command issues: a low-quality division commander can be hampering or crippling. General Winder on the Confederate side has a rating of three, so it’s 50/50 that his troops will be able to act properly, which mirrors the historical situation. For example, Ronald’s brigade is a strong formation but it suffers from being under Winder’s command. On the other hand, AP Hill has a five, so his forces will be able to act most of the time. It’s possible for leaders to be wounded, which reduces their ratings. CiC chits allow you to activate a brigade with no roll, unless the CiC is wounded.

I do have two questions here: 1. Is Winder’s low quality rating due to his illness that day, was he just not good overall, or a combination of the two? 2. There’s no mechanism for a brigade to have a chance at an independent activation when the division commander failed to get them moving, and I wondered about that. Was this not a feature of the battle or of the period? Some of the event chits abstract this to some degree (e.g. Rebel Yell, Confident, and Firefight), but those affect individual units rather than brigades.

When a brigade activates, its units can fire at enemy units, move, initiate close combat, and attempt to rally, in that sequence, but which of these it can do depends on the order it was given. The movement rate and whether the brigade’s units can make contact with enemy units also depends on the order given. An Attack order, for example, allows the units to do all of the above except rally. So the units can fire, then they can move, then they can initiate close combat, and then the brigade’s activation is over. Certain brigades come on as reinforcements, and enter from one of the map edges. For the Confederates in my game, this led to a huge traffic jam due to overstacking, woods, and the map edge. It also produced some odd situations in terms of where reinforcing units ended up. This was partly my fault in not defending a bit farther forward and in not sending more units around the whole mess.

Fire combat and close combat are governed by the strength points of the attacking unit, column shifts from terrain, weapon types, odds, etc., are applied. The attacker rolls two dice and checks a chart, and the defending unit may have to take a check of varying severity, based on its cohesion rating. Cohesion more or less represents morale, and a higher number is always better. Some units start with higher or lower cohesion, and it’s affected by whether they’ve taken morale hits or are battle worn from having been previously attacked, and whether they have contact with other units from their brigade: units on their own and units in the woods are vulnerable. Cohesion checks can result in units becoming depleted (flipping over to a weaker side), breaking, taking morale hits, and/or retreating. Certain results can lead to that unit retreating plus another unit retreating, if the other unit’s cohesion is also weak enough. Broken units are removed from the map and placed on a broken track, where they stay for a variable number of turns until they can have a chance to recover when their brigade rallies. Close combat can be very effective but the attacking unit has to endure fire combat from the target unit (and possibly other units), so it’s a riskier proposition, and there’s also a chance that the attacker will take losses or have to retreat.

Note that there’s no rout movement as such: when a unit breaks, it’s removed from the map, and its removal doesn’t cause nearby units any problems. I found this slightly odd.

Rally is only possible with certain orders and allows the brigade’s units that are far enough away from enemy units to remove morale hits and (depending on the order) to attempt to recover to full from the depleted side or return from the broken track.

Play proceeds in this way until the last chit has been drawn and applied. After the last chit has been drawn from the cup, each player has the opportunity to play any remaining event chits they hold, so there can be more action right at the end of the turn. Once that’s done, the Union player collects any VPs earned for certain hexes, various housekeeping occurs, and the next turn begins. I initially thought that per-turn VPs for the Union was too generous, but it’s probably about right, given that their units are likely to get broken and that they probably won’t take more than two low-value VP hexes.

At the end of the game, the Confederate player may earn VPs for certain hexes, and each side earns VPs for enemy units on the broken track. The two totals are compared and a winner is determined.

Optional rules:
There are a few of these. One requires a bit of extra bookkeeping but I used it for greater realism: if a battle worn unit goes to the broken track, it can come back to the battle but cannot recover to its fully-effective side after that.

The two most significant optional rules are a variable entry for the Jackson CiC chit, and a variable entry for Union reinforcements under Ricketts. In the historical battle, Jackson was aloof from the fighting for much of the day, and only became fully active in the late afternoon, so in the game, his chit doesn’t enter until Turn 9 unless you use the optional rule. Meanwhile, Ricketts’ division was near the battlefield but never showed up to the fighting; in the game, he can appear if an optional rule is applied.

Both of these rules should be used together and they work the same way: each of the counters has a track that may advance at the end of each turn. During each turn, when an event chit is drawn, that side can immediately choose to put it in a box next to the relevant track. At the end of each turn, the Confederate player rolls 2D6 and subtracts the number of event chits in the box. If the result is lower than the current turn, the Jackson chit moves forward one box, towards entry. The Union player does the same for Ricketts. When the Jackson chit gets to the final box, it will be in the cup next turn. When the Ricketts chit gets to the final box, the Union player chooses the order in which Ricketts’ brigades will arrive over the next few turns, and the Ricketts chit will be in the cup.

I used both of these in my game, and Jackson came in much earlier than Turn 9, followed closely by Ricketts, so the fight was more of a slugfest than it was historically. The mechanism of using the chits to improve the chances of bringing them both on faster is a good one from the perspective of forcing choices, but it had an artificial feel for me. To me, the event chits represent battlefield opportunities or oddities, and it’s weird to have them used for the purpose of sending couriers to try to get a general’s attention.

That’s it! I hope people find this useful and I’d welcome any feedback.
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HERMANN LUTTMANN
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Thanks Eric! I had typed a long answer to your questions and then lost it all when the power went out at work! Will retype it all tomorrow from home.

Herm
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Francis K. Lalumiere
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Thanks for the review, man.
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Mayor Jim
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Nice review...thanks. Looking forward to Hermann's reply as well.
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Richard Handewith

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Thanks for the review Eric!
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Fred W. Manzo
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Thanks very much for the review. Hermann will write up a more complete answer tomorrow, if they replace the squirrel that powers his computer.

But I always looked at the activation die roll as a measure of how fast a particular commander got his troops moving. Say the first thought a commander had when receiving an order was that he had to call in all his troops that were on details and he had to talk everything over with his subordinates to make sure they understood what he wanted of them. If that took an hour this means his unit did not move, in game terms, for three complete turns. It didn't necessarily mean he was disobeying orders, he was just being thorough (and slow).
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HERMANN LUTTMANN
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OK - let me try this again! I wish there was some kind of "draft" function on these posts so I didn't have to retype everything, but here we go.

1) The separate Artillery Phase is a purposeful design choice. The artillery at this battle functioned as a near independent entity, as it did in most ACW battles. So we felt that allowing it to be artificially attached to a particular division or brigade would give an unrealistic effect, allowing almost perfect coordination and cooperation between the arms. With the artillery firing first, the player would need to carefully plan ahead to get that kind of efficient "dance". By the same token, remember that artillery does still defend itself in Close Combat, so its canister effect is still available during the regular activation portion of the turn.

2) Winder's lower value is due to his physical condition and performance at this battle, not a judgement on his career. He was ill before the battle and was killed during it.

3) A brigade's inability to activate in a given turn is an abstraction of many things, not just an isolated halt. As Fred points out in his post, it can represent the hesitation of a commander or the consequences of battlefield conditions or many things. Don't forget - these are only 20 minute turns and a lack of activation in one turn is only a relatively small period of time in the overall battle. It would be rare for a brigade to be constantly active all the hours it spent on the battlefield. Also, don't forget that the ability of Event chits and CIC chits to activate units can reflect a kind of partial activation of units that would otherwise not be able to do anything in the turn.

4) A "rout" that you're talking about is really the Cohesion Test result that creates a multi-hex retreat and the infliction of Morale Hits. There's also a "Panic" result in some cases that causes problems for adjacent friendly units. The "Broken" result reflects a unit that has lost all cohesion - it is essentially a useless mob at that point. Thus, it's position on the battlefield at that time is irrelevant - the men will not function as a combat effective unit and will run away at the approach of the enemy. The only way to get them back into the fight is to successfully rally them back, which takes time and some good die rolls.

5) The Unique/Common Event mechanic is an admittedly "game" mechanic and is an attempt at design-for-effect. It is actually one of my favorite mechanisms in the system as it provides an abstract method to measure the tough decisions that a commander must make. It is a game measure of tactical choices versus operational choices and reflects the mental assets - in a kharma or fate kind of way, if you wish - that are open to a commander's use. "Mindshare" is another way of putting it, I guess. So it challenges the player to decide on a tactical advantage "at the moment" or the investment of operational advantage in the long run. Note that not using a chit for its Common Event does not preclude the arrival of Jackson or Rickett's, but will only enhance the chances of success. This is a game decision for the player to make, but also in a esoteric way reflects the proper use of command "assets" afforded all generals in combat. I hope that doesn't sound all too hokey, but it's meant as an honest attempt at capturing some real command-decision challenges for the players.

I hope that answers everything. If you have any other questions or comments, please let me know. And thanks again for the great write up!

Hermann
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Rick Barber
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Herm's already answered all the points that I was going to, so I won't go into them further, except to say that not only was Winder very ill the whole week, but, like Jackson, he spent most of his time on the field playing 'Battery Commander' rather than taking any concern for the Infantry under his command. That why he was killed where he was, and why Jackson basically ignored everything happening elsewhere on the field until far too late. Ole' Jack wasn't the War's best tactical battlefield commander, and this field was one of many that showed why......

I'd highly recommend that you pick up Robert Krick's Stonewall Jackson at Cedar Mountain for a pretty balanced and very detailed account of the fight. Jackson felt this battle was his own 'personal best', but that rosey memory was based on a single shining event (that Rusty Sword thingee) and ignores his many blunders before and on the field, as well as the huge manpower advantage he had over Banks. Note that Rickett's arrival pretty much evens up the score, something that Stonewall didn't even allow for (or knew about at all, for that matter!) It would be very interesting to redraw this battlefield on TWO 17 x 22's, centered on the existing map, to allow for both better deployment possibilities for Jackson, as well as the ground that Ricketts actually historically deployed on at sunset, which is north of the belt of trees that marks the map edge on this current map. i.e, the area shown on the GBACW map of this battlefield shown in the current Twin Peaks game.

Excellent review and narrative, and I think you'll really enjoy the way the system (honed quite a bit in the development of this game) will show the battlefield chaos on the southern fields at Gettysburg on July 2nd. The next Revolution game in the series will be Pea Ridge, and Herm and I are already looking forward to some battles in The Valley; most likely Cross Keys/Port Republic (as 'chaotic' a battlefield situation as you're likely to find anytime/anywhere!)sauron
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Kirk Allton
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I look at the brigade activation failure as one of several causes. Either the division commander failed to recognize events going on and failed to act in a timely manner, or the courier he sent was unable to locate the brigade commander, or the brigade commander did not understand the order, or the brigade commander failed to get the brigade moving in a timely manner.

I remember reading about the battle of Chickamauga years ago in a booklet sold at battlefields. Bragg planned for the attack to develop by Polk's corps attacking on the right, then Longstreet would attack en echelon when he heard the fighting start. It was supposed to start at 8am. By 8:20, when no firing had been heard as of yet, Bragg sent a courier to find Polk. The courier found Polk on the front porch of his HQ (a house) reading a newspaper and told him that Bragg desired him to attack. Polk replied to tell Bragg he was very desirous of opening the attack.

One of the aspects of Civil War battles that has always intrigued me is command control in an era with no radios, and where commanders couldn't see all their troops above the regimental level. I think this game does a pretty good job in modeling that. My other favorite system is the Civil War Brigade series, which does the same thing.
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Rick Barber
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You'll find an excellent account of that truly 'Mad and Irregular Fight' in Dave Powell's new book (trilogy) on the Chickamauga campaign, which really brings out just how the command breakdown on both sides actually steered the whole things once the guns started firing. Like the Wilderness, a great example of why pre-radio armies don't want to try to fight in wooded terrain!
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Francis K. Lalumiere
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elcarto wrote:
You'll find an excellent account of that truly 'Mad and Irregular Fight' in Dave Powell's new book (trilogy) on the Chickamauga campaign, which really brings out just how the command breakdown on both sides actually steered the whole things once the guns started firing. Like the Wilderness, a great example of why pre-radio armies don't want to try to fight in wooded terrain!

Would you have the titles of those books, Rick?
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Mayor Jim
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HORST324 wrote:
OK - let me try this again! I wish there was some kind of "draft" function on these posts so I didn't have to retype everything, but here we go.

1) The separate Artillery Phase is a purposeful design choice. The artillery at this battle functioned as a near independent entity, as it did in most ACW battles. So we felt that allowing it to be artificially attached to a particular division or brigade would give an unrealistic effect, allowing almost perfect coordination and cooperation between the arms. With the artillery firing first, the player would need to carefully plan ahead to get that kind of efficient "dance". By the same token, remember that artillery does still defend itself in Close Combat, so its canister effect is still available during the regular activation portion of the turn.

2) Winder's lower value is due to his physical condition and performance at this battle, not a judgement on his career. He was ill before the battle and was killed during it.

3) A brigade's inability to activate in a given turn is an abstraction of many things, not just an isolated halt. As Fred points out in his post, it can represent the hesitation of a commander or the consequences of battlefield conditions or many things. Don't forget - these are only 20 minute turns and a lack of activation in one turn is only a relatively small period of time in the overall battle. It would be rare for a brigade to be constantly active all the hours it spent on the battlefield. Also, don't forget that the ability of Event chits and CIC chits to activate units can reflect a kind of partial activation of units that would otherwise not be able to do anything in the turn.

4) A "rout" that you're talking about is really the Cohesion Test result that creates a multi-hex retreat and the infliction of Morale Hits. There's also a "Panic" result in some cases that causes problems for adjacent friendly units. The "Broken" result reflects a unit that has lost all cohesion - it is essentially a useless mob at that point. Thus, it's position on the battlefield at that time is irrelevant - the men will not function as a combat effective unit and will run away at the approach of the enemy. The only way to get them back into the fight is to successfully rally them back, which takes time and some good die rolls.

5) The Unique/Common Event mechanic is an admittedly "game" mechanic and is an attempt at design-for-effect. It is actually one of my favorite mechanisms in the system as it provides an abstract method to measure the tough decisions that a commander must make. It is a game measure of tactical choices versus operational choices and reflects the mental assets - in a kharma or fate kind of way, if you wish - that are open to a commander's use. "Mindshare" is another way of putting it, I guess. So it challenges the player to decide on a tactical advantage "at the moment" or the investment of operational advantage in the long run. Note that not using a chit for its Common Event does not preclude the arrival of Jackson or Rickett's, but will only enhance the chances of success. This is a game decision for the player to make, but also in a esoteric way reflects the proper use of command "assets" afforded all generals in combat. I hope that doesn't sound all too hokey, but it's meant as an honest attempt at capturing some real command-decision challenges for the players.

I hope that answers everything. If you have any other questions or comments, please let me know. And thanks again for the great write up!

Hermann
Bingo!...thanks Herm for the response...
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Rick Barber
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Specifically, that would be Dave Powell's The Chickamauga Campaign: A Mad Irregular Battle: From the Crossing of the Tennessee River Through the Second Day, August 22 - September 19, 1863, by Savas Beatie Books. That's the first of the eventual three books in his trilogy; the second installment finishes the battle from dawn on the 20th and carries the narrative through the retreat from the battlefield that night. The third covers the retreat into Chattanooga and the beginning of the siege, as well as appendices and essays exploring specific questions in substantially greater detail. He's just finishing up that second volume, and like GRR Martin, needs to stop puttering around and 'write like the wind!'

The book has a fair amount of good maps and photos, but I'd highly recommend also picking up Dave's The Maps of Chickamauga, also by SB. That one has an abbreviated but still very good narrative, accompanied by a full page map on every facing page! It also starts earlier (June 22) and ends later (Sept 23) covering the entire Tullahoma Campaign which leveraged Bragg out of Tennessee and preceded Rosecrans' move across the river. As many maps as Dave has in the trilogy book, this one really fills in the gaps.

A further note on Winder - while he was Jackson's favorite commander of the Stonewall Brigade (he was a strict disciplinarian after the old boy's heart!) Winder actually despised his commander and thought him a dangerous idiot! His first act in the days immediately after Port Republic was to attempt to get Richmond to transfer him somewhere, anywhere else! To no avail...... At Cedar Mountain he had been sick for a week, which is why Ronald had command of the Brigade. Jackson 'arranged' for him to have command of the Valley Division on the battlefield by having Lawton, the ranking Brigadier, and his troops stay behind guarding the overly large train of wagons that Jackson had saddled himself with for the campaign.

That Jackson deployed two full brigades to that task was a necessity brought on by the actions of one John Buford, who with his small Union Cavalry Brigade had raided the left/western flank of Jackson's strung out army during the night preceding the battle. This cost most of Jackson's already tired troops any real sleep during that night, due to the many real and false alarms. Buford then headed northwest to Madison CH and circled back to Pope's HQ, but in addition to the above his actions cost Jackson over half of Robertson's Laurel Brigade of cavalry, sent under Grumble Jones in a 'pursuit' that never found anything, but pretty much guaranteed Jackson making a largely 'blind' approach to the battle. No wonder that Jackson made an urgent request for Stuart to come and make a personal 'inspection' of his Cavalry!
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Eric Stubbs
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Thanks all for the comments, and thanks to Hermann and Rick for the additional details!

For Hermann/Rick:
1. That makes sense about the artillery phase; I agree that given what you're saying about how the artillery operated (I didn't know about this feature of the period), it wouldn't make sense to attach it to a brigade due to the unrealistic effect. I admit that it still feels peculiar to me that the cannons all shoot (apart from any defensive fire) and the lone cavalry acts all before the infantry act. But thinking about it further, it would be weird in a different way to have some mechanism like "instead of (or prior to?) drawing a chit, choose an artillery unit or units stacked together to shoot or move", since that could lead to the coordination that wasn't really present. It might also be a weaker choice compared to activation of a brigade, but depending on the situation, it could be quite powerful, much like a well-timed Firefight or Rebel Yell. Anyway, I don't mind the phase, it just struck me as peculiar and I wanted to hear more about the design decisions behind it. In my games I found myself bracing for the storm of fire from the much better Union guns, but thanks to their positioning and range from a lot of the action, they weren't amazing. Still, they certainly make Confederate counterattacks a riskier proposition.

2. Understood about Winder, thanks, that's good to know.

3. Good points here and from Fred, thank you.

4. Sorry, I was being imprecise with the use of the word "rout". What I meant was that in other tactical games, when a unit has had enough, it undergoes rout movement, which can cause other units to rout if it moves through them. My main point of reference here is the Jours de Gloire series. This game handles morale differently, and you're right that a unit taking morale hits and a multi-hex retreat (plus possibly going from fresh to battle worn) is certainly a rout. I was pointing out that when the unit does finally disintegrates completely and ends up on the broken track, it doesn't have any effect on nearby units unless there was also a panic result on the Cohesion test. I think the mechanisms end up working out fine in terms of results, but I was thinking of something like "when a unit breaks, move it the number of retreat hexes specified and if it moves through friendly units, they may need to check cohesion or risk morale hits/retreats".

5. Completely fair reasoning. I do like the mechanism from a player-choice perspective. In my solo game, I found myself dumping a lot of chits in there (particularly as the Confederates, since the Union found Quick March and Brigade Reserve Movement quite helpful to hustle themselves across the field), but I think that might not have been altogether the way to go (might have been better to mess with the opponent more, particularly to slow down how fast the Union can move), and it would be quite different opposed.


Glad to know Pea Ridge is coming from Revolution Games, count me in for that! Do you think it will be released before or after Hammerin' Sickles? I referred to the latter as the next game in the series before knowing about the Pea Ridge game.
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HERMANN LUTTMANN
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Great Eric - I'm glad we were able to explain all that satisfactorily!
As far as Pea Ridge and Hammerin' Sickles ... who knows? I'd put my money on Pea Ridge because HS hasn't hit the magic 500 yet, which is actually a magic 6-700. So it could be quite a while.

Thanks again!
Hermann
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Christina Kahrl
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Delighted to hear that a Pea Ridge game is in the mix, passing over DG's recent entry it has been a look on time since the GBACW game I loved so dearly as a kiddo. Since my copy of SS arrives on Monday, I'll have plenty of time -- hopefully not too too much time -- to get familiar with the system.
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Chris Nelson
United States
Florida
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I'd LOVE to see Pea Ridge done, especially with a larger map!!
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HERMANN LUTTMANN
United States
New York
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Well, Chris - we are working on it as I type this. Roger Miller and I have hammered out a very cool OOB and we're just now fitting the system into the battle. It looks awesome. - I can't to get this on the playtest table.

Thanks!

Hermann
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Rick Barber
United States
New Cumberland
Pennsylvania
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asgard636 wrote:
I'd LOVE to see Pea Ridge done, especially with a larger map!!


It will be that - two 17 x 22's side by side. I'm just working up the final prototype now, while Herm and Roger hammer out the OOB and counters.
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Andrew Franke
United States
Elkton
Virginia
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I am really looking forward to the Cross Keys Port Republic game as I live about 5 miles away. The Dual battlefield always interested me and the intensity of the fight for the coaling from what I have read was confused, hot, filled with smoke and the outcome never certain.

I love this game already and this system ported to those battles is a dream come true for me as was this game the first time I played it.


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HERMANN LUTTMANN
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New York
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Thanks Andrew! We'll be taking suggestions for the third installment of the series after we put Thunder in the Ozarks to bed. Cross Keys/Port Republic is an interesting situation but may be a bit small - though it might make an excellent quickie game or tutorial for the series.
We'll see!

Hermann
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Chris Barlow
United States
Braintree
Massachusetts
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I thought the next installment was going to be the rest of Gettysburg covering Cemetery Hill/Culp's Hill?
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HERMANN LUTTMANN
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New York
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Hey Chris! That would be the game after Hammerin' Sickles, for GMT. The medium/small battles are being done with Revolution.

Thanks!
Herm
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