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Lawrence Hung
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Wan Chai
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Death is nothing, but to live defeated and inglorious is to die daily!

On to Paris!

Napoleon in retreat, full. Napoleon was defeated in the battle of Leipzig the previous year. He was determined to make one last stand on the road to Paris. Facing coalition between Russian under Blucher and Prussian under Sacken, Napoleon caught them and was about to crush them in decisive battles before Paris in 6 days of February, 1814.

Designed by Hall of Fame Napoleonic game designer Kevin Zucker, developed by Paul Dangel, the game comes with a standard 22" x 34" map by Rick Barber showing mud and snowy ground at 1,700 yards per hex, 280 counters, mostly division size units. One 24-pages rulebook with 6-pages of historical commentary by the designer and 1-page of Terrain Effects Chart included (hence the rules actually occupy only 17 pages).

The Six Days of Glory is an operational Napoleonic game. 3 short scenarios are included, covering the campaigns in three separate battles at three cities along the road to Paris: Champaubert (9~10 Feb); Montmirail (11~12 Feb) and Vauchamps (13~14 Feb), each playable in less than 1 ½ hours. A campaign scenario linking all three (9~14 Feb) battles from the beginning to the end can be completed in less than 3 hours.

The French moves first in all scenarios. The game has a standard command check – move – combat sequence with an additional night turn on each turn during which armies can force march to out maneuver the enemy. Features include Chain-of-Command and Leadership Initiative, Artillery Bombardment, Supply and demoralization, Repulse at odds greater than 5-to-1, Movement across Pontoon Trains and Bridges (Allied only), and an interesting weather effect of forced mud on wheeled unit during the afternoon (PM) turn. Team play is also possible where Allied command is divided between Prussian and Russian and thus communication between the two is not allowed unless written messages are exchanged.

A lobour of love, this one-mapper game came as a surprise to me after reading the rules and getting to know how it works. At operational Napoleonic level, you are saved from the minute detail as to the rock-scissors-paper (a la column-line-square) formation tactics. The rules are really written very neat (though sometimes you need referring to different section for the supporting rationale of the more assumed parts e.g. stacking rules, command range and points etc.)

You must not fight too often with one enemy, or you will teach him all your art of war.

Center to the game is the concept of Corps and officers (i.e. Corps Commander) of the combat units. Initiative of the leaders is extremely important for this game as to the ability of the leader to make his own corps move when the combat units are out of the Army Leader command range( i.e. he is 5,100 yards away approximately, extended if road hexes are involved).

Chain of command between Army Commander and Corp Commanders are crucial to keep the army intact for operations. Once the line of communication is broken, units are more prone to disorganize. Reorganization of the demoralized units is hell of a tough decision to make as to which 2 of each Corp should be recovered each day after the night turn. Given the short scenario length and the mere 5 times reorganization phase in the entire campaign, you get an intense picture of rolling up the leader's sleeve call for a forward charge from the broken soldiers before the enemy could outflank you from behind.....

Combat table is bloodier than expected from my past experience with the Napoleonic game. Victory points are awarded to the control of key cities, losses inflicted on the enemy or exiting units off the opposite map edges. Rick Barber does the map excellent with forts and forests covered with snow from a sky bird view. The counters are done excellent too with individual corps ensign for easy chain-of-command check.

Road march and night force march are more used in the campaign game rather than individual shorter scenarios. Cavalry can retreat before combat and leader may be captured if surrounded (it is rare though). The campaign game can be completed in one sitting (approx. 3 hours) and is very good for solitaire play. Overall, if you want a game that the more you play, the more you like, this is the one. An immensely enjoyable game.

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Van Vorhis
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Apple Valley
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Re:User Review
Lawrence Hung (#20637),

Hi, I enjoyed your review of Six Days of Glory. I've never played the game and don't own it but am tempted to get it. The question I've always had about it is how is it different than, say, Napoleon At Bay? Is it just an excerpt from NAB, or a different game system?
 
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Lawrence Hung
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Wan Chai
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Re:User Review
JG88 (#24270),

Probably not a NAB series game. There is no reference to the NAB series in this game's rulebook. Nor there is a standard series rule book together with a special reference book on this campaign. But since Kevin Zucker has done a lot of Napoleonic games, you can find a lot of similarities in his design decisions, e.g. the use of off board fog-of-war markers, the command chain, the use of reserves etc. Check out NAB series game by clicking here:
http://www.napoleongames.com/vae-rev.html
6 Days of Glory is not among one of them.

Hope this would answer your question.
Lawrence
 
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M St
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Re:User Review
JG88 (#24270),

it's an entirely different system from Napoleon at Bay; more like Napoleon's Last Battles (except that turns are roughly 4 hours and so command works differently and there is a different CRT).
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