Recommend
77 
 Thumb up
 Hide
4 Posts

Taj Mahal» Forums » Strategy

Subject: So. . . you want to control India. . . rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: Strategy_and_Tactics [+] [View All]
Chuck Uherske
United States
Rockville
Maryland
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mb
Enter, my friend. So . . . you have travelled here to learn the elusive secret to controlling India? Sit down, eager one, and allow me to pour you some tea. Ours is a vast and diverse land. It can only be won through methods of great subtlety, insight, and self-discipline. To realize your ambitions, there are ten lessons that you must master. . .

First, Know that Peace Comes Through Strength. The best consequence of accumulated power is not to win battles, but to deter them. If others see that you hold a mighty hand of cards, they will retreat before you. If so, your power wins not only today’s prize, but likely tomorrow's as well. A strong hand in one suit will also profit you in the game’s final tally. Focus therefore on accumulating such systemic strength, and attend to that amassed by your enemies.

Second, Greed. . . is Bad. It is better to spend a little to gain a little, than to shed much blood to gain a lot. It profits you more to be patient and to win the loyalties of two figures over two provinces, rather than both in one. Moreover, a sudden and rash expenditure of your resources will prevent you from perfecting the previously mentioned strategem of victory through deterrence.

Third, Sting Like a Bee. A temporary surge of force can sometimes secure quick gains even when you lack the stamina for a more sustained conflict. If you are immediately on the scene with three elephants, or with two figures of a kind, you may be able to claim your prizes and quickly depart the scene -- also claiming the best two reinforcement cards -- before stronger forces can gather to control the field.

Fourth, Marshal Your Ability To Sting Hard, Fast and Sure. Build your forces to allow for such application of concentrated force. Often, cards with two elephants, or with two figures, will enable a quick score where an elephant attended by a solitary figure would not. White cards (which can add an extra figure to a single offering) substitute such sudden, localized strength for the greater but slower strength of colored cards.

Fifth, Know When to Fold’Em. Be certain when betting on the strength of your supporters. Pick battles you will win, and avoid those where you are not sure. Downside risk, in a contest of this nature, is too great. Sometimes even the victorious party, after a bloody battle, will be too exhausted to subsequently prosper.

Sixth, Know When to Run. It is unlikely that you will prevail if you experience more than a couple of rounds where you win nothing at all. The odds are, however, that there will be at least one such dark day on your road to victory. Choose it carefully. The optimal time to retreat even before playing your first card, is in a round where you are pessimistic about winning something, and when having the first choice of replacement cards is most important to you.

Seventh, Distinguish Life’s Necessary Commodities from Mere Vanities. It may appear at first glance that you will profit similarly whether focusing on palace chains or basic commodities. After all, the first province in a palace chain wins one point, the second wins two, and so on, as with commodities. But the solid resources are more trustworthy assets. If you win a box of tea, it will add value to the next box you win, no matter when and how – whereas you will usually be less certain that your palaces will connect. Favor then, my eager pupil, the basic resources of life, over the vanity of palace-building.

Eighth, Choose Your Allies With A Purpose of Power. You will have labored in vain if, come the last day, you have in your camp a single monk, a single vizier, and a single princess. They will have been worth but one point each to you if you have not acquired a second ally of a kind, and the vital powers that go with it. A figure is thus best pursued if you have a plan (or time) to win a second. Know, too, the relative usefulness of potential supporters. The yellow +2 bonus is always good, but there are circumstances in which the powers of purple and orange can be truly vital.

Ninth, Favor Figures Early, Elephants Late. This is because the likely utility of individual figures diminishes with each round. It is foolhardy to invest in your first of a figure in round 11. Even if a second such figure is won in the final round, you will not be able to use its power, other than a point for holding the power card at game’s end. The special powers will generally only profit you in proportion into the number of turns that you can use them.

Tenth, You Can’t Be Everywhere. Shun diversification. Don’t send your elephants to win the first of a new, fourth commodity, if in the next round they could win you your fourth of a kind. Similarly, it’s very unlikely that you can control the special powers for each of yellow, purple, orange and green, so don’t bleed your resources trying. Know your strengths and play to them.

Your face shows a mixture of understanding, determination and puzzlement. Indeed, the true meaning of these lessons will only become clear to you after you go forth to apply them for yourself. May peace and prosperity attend you, my friend. As a token of my good wishes, please accept this basket of freshly made samosas, a family specialty in which we take some undue, perhaps, pride. And after you take the throne, please remember us, and our faith in you.
47 
 Thumb up
0.35
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
David
New Zealand
Wellington
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Great. Excellent. Thank you.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Tom Hudson
United States
Vermilion
Ohio
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
what meowsqueak said
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mike Marshall
United States
Sudlersville
Maryland
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Captures the game perfectly...
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.