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Subject: My Approach to Battlelore (Part 1) rss

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Jay Borden
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In order to fully understand where I am coming from, please first read my “How to Minimize Luck in Battle Lore” article (http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/148780). This is an attempt to explain how I press an attack while sticking to the conservative approach outlined in that article.

Intro:

As stated previously in other articles in the BGG Battlelore strategy forum, I am a conservative Battlelore player. I always set up my hand for my next turn when possible, keep my units in supported formations, and do not press an attack unless I have an advantage. All of my previous examples in the other discussions were really trying to hammer home the advantages of keeping units supported and how defense requires fewer resources than offense. I always said I’d press an advantage when I saw one, but never expanded much on what I considered to be an advantage worth pressing or how I would set up the attack once I saw one. This article will hopefully shed some light on when and how I shift my tactics to press an attack.


Terms and Abbreviations

In this article, the following terms/abbreviations are frequently used.

“Trading dice” or “? for ?,? trade” (where ? is a number) – Trading dice is the term I use when assuming the opponent will get battle back attacks from having supported formations. A “6 for 3,3” trade would be a total of 6 dice from separate attacking units with the defender getting 3 dice per battle back. 2 red foot units concentrating on a supported green archer unit would be a “8 for 2,2 trade”.

“?|?|?” where the “?” is a number or “C” – this is an attempt to shorten the verbiage for describing a command card by stating how many orders can be issued in each section (“0|3|0” would be a command card for 3 orders in the center; “0|0|C” would be the advance right card that lets you order a number of units equal to the number of command card you have in hand in the right section).

“Base to Base” – Basically in an adjacent hex to the enemy or melee range (a holdout term from my Games Workshop Warhammer Fantasy days).

“Big Order” – A command card that can be used to issue orders to more than 3 units. It can be a 2|2|2, an Advance card, or a tactics / banner color card if you have a lot of the matching unit type.

“Even dice” –The likely roll based on the odds. 6 dice rolled with banners and orange bonus strikes hitting should get 2 wounds (33%), ‘even dice’ would be 2 wounds.

“3-pack” or “6 pack” -units in triangles that give mutual support to the other units in the formation. A “forward 3-pack” would have the 2 units in the same row closer to the opponent (this is the preferred way to set them up since you limit the number of units your opponent can get on the front units, and it's more flexible for retreating and advancing). The 6 pack is 4 units up front, with 2 in the second rank with an empty hex between them to allow the front units to withdraw/retreat (two 3 packs next to each other).


The Basic Advantages

Obviously, when given an opportunity to hit a unit without support (while keeping your support), you have an advantage. Assuming both you and your opponent are in supported formations so battle backs are expected, I see 5 main ways to get an advantage:

1. Superior troops
2. Concentrated attacks
3. Attacking wounded units
4. Attrition
5. Lore spells

While the above points are fairly self explanatory, I’ll explain my take on each.

Superior Troops – This one is really straight forward. If I have a red unit hitting a green unit, I’ll get a 4 for 2 trade every round they hit each other. The trick is trying to get your ‘better’ unit in an adjacent hex to weaker units. If you are the player that advances his line, the limited movement of the heavy units will require more actions to get across the board. If you are the defender, chances are your opponent will be trying to set up the attack away from your heavy units, so you’ll need to adjust your line to get them into the combat.

Concentrated attacks – If you can get a 6 for 3,3 trade and follow up with a 9 for 3,3,3 trade the next turn, you will most likely wipe out an entire unit and have the wounds you’ve taken be spread over a few different units (assuming even dice).

Attacking wounded units – If an earlier combat, spell, or range attack weakened a unit, trading an even number of dice with the unit will likely kill off the wounded unit first. If hitting a wounded unit with concentrated attacks, a 9 for 3,3,3 trade will likely end up destroying the wounded unit setting up an even better trade (making it a 9 for 3,3; or 6 for 3; or even a 3 for 0 trade).

Attrition – The greater resource needed to win by attrition is not units, but orders. Assuming both players will get an equal number of dice from attacks and battle backs, the player that issues the orders will be the one that drives the conflict and can set up his units to gain the advantage. If you have 4 cards that can order units in a flank, you’ll likely be able to shift back wounded units and concentrate attacks longer than your opponent. This comes at a higher risk, but is still worth mentioning when used with the above advantages.

Lore Spells - Not all spells effect combat, but I consider 3 types of spells when looking for an advantage:

1. Spells that soften the opponent’s units (either by causing wounds or removing support units)
2. Combat trick spells (anything that increases your dice, decreases your opponent’s dice, or anything else that allows you to ignore or redirect hits)
3. Spells that increase your movement or somehow allow you to get additional troops into the melee



My Basic approach to Hand Management

My approach to hand management is based on conserving resources in an attempt to set up combinations of cards over multiple turns. The main argument against my approach is that I am wasting turns by not always attacking which gives my opponent more time. My view is that my advances and counter-attacks will be more effective since I am setting them up and have saved big order resources for when they are most needed or effective. By planning my actions based on the resources I know I will have available next turn, I will not need to rely on the luck of the draw to continue pressing an attack or to regroup as often.


In an attempt to better illustrate how I approach the game, I’ll outline my typical line of thinking each turn.

1. Determine and evaluate the current centers of conflict

A red foot unit 4 hexes away is not likely to make an immediate difference in any battle, so I first try to set focus on what I need to influence most this turn. Mainly, this is where troops are already in base to base combat or about to engage with supported formations from 1 hex away. In the early game, it could be where the units are in archer range. During the late game, this could be anywhere a wounded unit is within striking distance of a mounted unit.

I look first to see how many and which units are involved in each conflict, and what units are close enough to join the battle. I then look for unit support and wounds on both sides and determine if I have the upper hand or if I am in trouble.


2. Identify where I am strong or weak based on command cards

My main factor for determining strength is how much I can influence a section or units with the command cards in hand. 10 supported units that I cannot order are not a resource I have any control over. They are just lumps on my side of the board whose actions are 100% reliant on my opponent and luck until I draw the right command card. On the flip side, a single wounded unit I have 5 cards to order will still be weak, but at least I still have control over it to withdraw or make a desperate attack if needed.


3. Review my Lore

I review my lore spells available in hand, and the lore tokens I have available to cast them. I look to see what spells may be able to help my current positions or weaken my opponent the most.


4. Look at the odds

I match up my strength from command cards with each conflict.

I do a quick “what damage can my opponent do next turn” for each conflict where I am losing. I usually think of my opponent being able to order 2 or 3 units in any individual section. I mainly look for where even dice will break my formations while keeping him in support formations (example: 2 wounds on my unit in base to base). If my formation is already broken, I look at how many turns it will take to close and destroy those units. Once a unit is broken off from support, I know unless it’s regrouped or withdraws, it will be easily eliminated.

I’ll also look at what damage even dice will do for each of my command cards and guess “how much can my opponent recover next turn” for each conflict that I am winning. Evaluating my aggressive actions is usually a quick “will this net me more”. If he has 2 units without support to my 1, I’ll lean towards attacking since I will lose a bigger opportunity than my opponent would gain.


5.look for set up / follow up actions

As I evaluate each conflict, I try to think of how to better set up or follow up the actions with the resources I have in hand. A simple example would be moving a center unit to the flank where you have an advance order. Evaluating that flank advance order without looking at it in combination with the rest of your hand may still be a good action, but looking for those set up or follow up orders can make your big order cards more effective. Looking further at the same example, assume you had another order for that flank. You can look at how using the other order before the advance may wound the opponent’s front line or set up your units to get more attacks in with the advance order. Be careful though, this approach can easily be over done to the point of losing the advantage if you try to set up something too many turns in advance. I find 2 or 3 turn actions usually get the best results since you want to play your big orders before your units start taking too many wounds.

This approach is by no means an all or nothing strategy. The most difficult part of this approach is learning when to act immediately with a single order, and when to plan a set up or follow up action. While looking for those combinations, remember your opponent gets actions in between your turns. If you are not supported, you usually don’t want to set up something for 3 turns later until you first regroup.


The Typical Game
Each scenario has a specific victory condition that both players are trying to complete, at this time it is typically a specific number of victory points. While the end goal of the game is always the same, my strategy to achieve that goal usually evolves the same way over the course of the game. Below is a rough order of my priorities and objectives during each phase of the game.


My Main Plan

1. Keep all units supported
2. Fight when/where I have the advantage
3. If I do not have the advantage, try to minimize my opponent’s advantage

There will be times when I can not prioritize the above items, but sticking to this plan as much as possible will help me achieve the victory conditions of the scenario (or at least make it more difficult for my opponent to do so).


The Early Game

1. Adjust Formations

Most scenarios have a few unit placements which are less than ideal. How many scenarios start with your mounted units up front in range of the opponent’s archers? How about red foot units that start in terrain hexes that decrease battle dice while an archer unit is in the very next hex?

The most obvious disadvantage is the mounted units up front in range of the opponent’s archers. I’ll attempt to screen them with foot units or terrain, but just as often moving them out of range towards a flank is necessary. Weak line formations that leave end units unsupported or a weak point in the center are just as bad. Set up 3-packs and 6-packs for those weak formations and get archers into good positions. Green units usually benefit the most from the extra defense the terrain provides, so when giving the opportunity...take advantage of it. Remember the hexes along the flank lines that can be ordered by both center and flank section orders. If you can get an early archer unit on one of those hexes, you’ll likely get a shot or 2 off with the odd extra order as you adjust your formations.

Keep in mind your big orders and where you may want to eventually make a move. As I’m setting up my formations, I’m also trying to set up later opportunities. If I have a Mounted Charge order and all my mounted units are separated, I may try to group them up for a big counter-attack or second wave attack after an advance later on. If I have a Darken the Skies order, I’ll attempt to get my archers in range of targets where my command cards will allow me to push. You shouldn’t plan your entire game based on your opening hand, but it’s never too early to group units in formations that will make sense later in the game.


2. Cycle command cards to set up an advance

As I’ve said before, all command cards are not created equally. Everyone would rather have a 0|C|0 card than a 0|2|0 card (even if they have no units in the center, it at least keeps the opponent from getting it and it may be useful later). At the start of the game, it will be a few turns before units get into base to base. I like to try to use up the 1 and 2 order command cards to adjust my formations and hopefully draw into better cards to replace them. When the lines do meet, I don’t want to be using scout and 2 order cards if possible…I’ll be hoping I’ll have a big order to play and gain me the advantage. Assuming even odds for the command cards drawn, you’ll get about the same amount of good and bad cards as your opponent. I play to maximize my chance of having good cards when they are needed most.

This should not be taken to the extreme where you play out your last command card in a section rather than keep a 2 order; or never move your units forward until you have a hand completely full of advance cards. It is basically saying that you should try to conserve your big orders for the conflicts and use the lesser resource to set up or regroup in between conflicts if possible. If you find your hand is filling up with small orders, that’s the time to regroup and withdrawn after a conflict until you have the advantage again. It’s better to use your small orders to back off than use your only big order to push into a new conflict that you do not have the resources needed to keep the advantage (the conservative play’s best case: you draw into another useful big order and now have 2 resources to push; worst case: your opponent pushes into you, and you still have the big order to counter).


3. Range attacks

Archers will rarely play the decisive roll in any game, but they are especially effective in the early game to threaten the opponent’s mounted units and slightly weaken the enemy’s line. The 1 in 6 chance per die can add up some early wounds with a bit of luck. Put an emphasis on setting up your formations first, but try to keep those archers active as you are adjusting your army.


Mid game

With my conservative approach, mid game usually starts 5 or 6 turns in when our main advancing units get into base to base. You should have plenty of time to adjust formations, gather a bit of lore, and hopefully draw into a couple of big orders.


1. Maintain formation

Maintaining formations in the mid game is essential. The most common trigger for the end game is a broken line followed up by wiping out a unit or two the next turn. By keeping formation and rotating wounded units to the back of your 3-pack and 6-pack formations, you’ll decrease the odds of your opponent easily breaking your lines. When advancing, it’s better to take an extra turn to reach the enemy than leaving an exposed unit without support. After conflicts, be sure to regroup before pushing further unless you still have abundant resources.

In my games, the most common mistake I’ve seen my opponents make is an aggressive follow up in the mid game leaving a unit unsupported. If the game is to 6 victory points, you'll still have plenty of time to kill that wounded unit. You should never leave your units unsupported to finish a unit until the end game (and even then the risk needs to be greatly justified).


2. Advancing / Prepare for the opponent’s push

If the opponent is aggressively moving his line up, I’ll usually let him move towards me. By moving forward, he’ll be separating his attacking line from reinforcements and extra support. He’ll also likely have his slower red units falling behind his main line. If the opponent must hit supported troops, he’ll be looking to hit the green ones first to prevent as many battle back dice as possible. While he’s moving to get to your side of the board, you should prepare for that conflict by shifting your formations to leave your weaker units screened and taking as many ranged attacks as possible to weaken his advancing troops.

If the opponent is cautiously approaching, you should also try to shape the battle by advancing supported units where you have the advantage. Nothing is gained from quickly sending just a few units far from your main line at this point. Make your opponent earn the opening by slowly advancing in supported formations.


3. Set up and execute big orders and lore spell combos

This is the point in the game where I try to set up board positions that will allow me to maximize my cards in hand. If I have advance order or one of the color banners, I’ll try to set up a turn where I can get the maximum units possible into combat and attacking (by moving units in from different flanks if necessary). If I’m still weak with command cards, I’ll be looking to delay getting into base to base until I have better resources available.

For the lore spells, here are a few combos I hope to be able to set up:

Darken the Skies with Magic Missiles (or Take Aim) – Lore cards that increases a unit's attack dice rolled will work for all attacks that unit makes during the turn (so both attacks from darken the skies will be increased). Mass might and the other spells that increase attack dice work too, but they can be more effective if used to help break a formation in melee combat.

Greater Portal – a combo all by itself when switching an opponent’s unit with one of your units. This one spell can remove support from the enemy, reinforce your front line, and leave an opponent’s unit unsupported and surrounded by your units all at the same time.

Terrified! or Portal before a big order (also Greater portal, and Fireball if lucky)– spells that can break an opponent’s support right before you get into base to base with a big order can set up a great, low risk attack.

Most of the spells effects make how best to use them obvious. Spells that add dice to all attacking units are better used when you have several units attack. Spells that increase movement can set up an unexpected attack or get additional units into a combat that would be out of range. Combat tricks like web can weaken your opponent’s big order when that front unit is now stuck in the way, and he’ll have less units advancing to attack and keep everyone supported.


End game

Once at least one player starts to get within 2 points of victory (or 3 if there’s a broken line where points can be easily picked up), I focus less on defense and try to concentrate all resources on the best way to win the game. An opponent will have plenty of time to close and attack unsupported units left in the early game; a unit left unsupported in the last few turns give the opponent a much smaller window of time to gain any advantage from it. You still should not leave units unsupported without reason, but it’s not as important as during the early game if it will increase you odds of winning the game before your opponent can.

1. Race to win (risks based on position)

Strategy in the End game is really based on how close the game is, and if you are winning or losing. As the game gets more desperate, so should your willingness to take risks. A slim chance is worth taking if even dice will easily give the game to the opponent in the next 2 turns.

If you are leading by a few points, unless there are enough easy kills to quickly win, conservative play is still the best approach. With the lead, your opponent will need to overwhelm you to even up the score, and then claim the last few points needed for the win. Put an emphasis on regrouping and screening wounded units; then look for openings and only press where you have the advantage. If you have a range advantage, take out his range and pluck away to get the last few points (or to draw your opponent in for a last desperate attack).

If it’s a close match, you’ll need to set up the killing blow before your opponent can make his. Evaluate each conflict on the board, and see what opportunity gives you the best odds of collecting the needed victory points. Then look for where the opponent will be able to overwhelm you. If you are not likely to finish first or if it’s too close to tell, look for ways to possibly delay your opponent’s action. Retreating those 2 wounded blue foot units 2 hexes may force your opponent to spend 2 turns to close again (obviously don’t run from mounted units). With that extra turn, he may run out of resources or you may have enough time to now win. When you see the odds are in your favor, push the attack before you lose the opportunity…don’t hesitate.

If you are behind, sometimes you just have to roll the dice. You should finish off any wounded units as quickly as possible (even at the expense of leaving your units exposed). If you opponent has a chance to regroup them, you likely will not get another chance to get back in the game. Once the obvious last few easy kills are made by both players, don’t waste time regrouping. Look to press your best chance before the opponent can fully regroup. If no attack is likely to gain you an advantage, you’ll have no choice but to regroup and hope to get a lucky lore spell or combo that can get you back in it. Time is almost always on the winning player’s side, but if you have a range advantage you may be able to even it up a bit or force your opponent to push a less than ideal attack. Press where you have the advantage, but your only real hope is on getting lucky dice or drawing a killer lore spell to save you. Once the situation is beyond repair, let the dice fly and hope for the unlikely odds.


Stay Tuned…

This article is getting far too long, so I will save the next couple of sections I want to cover for part 2. My next article will include troop roles, how to set up advances, and tons of specific examples of unit maneuvers. I write only a paragraph or 2 at a time during work (between projects or at lunch), so it may take a bit of time to put together. My goal is to get a lot more detailed than this outlined approach does.

Please try to keep each of the points I make above in the context of the overall approach. Some points will work in a more aggressive approach, some may not. I encourage feedback, discussion, or counter strategy to any of the points I’ve outlined above. This post is an attempt to outline my current approach to the game, so I welcome any views that can help to improve it.
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Brian Baird
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Re: My Approach to Battlelore – Part 1
[quote]For the lore spells, here are a few combos I hope to be able to set up:

Darken the Skies with Magic Missiles (or Take Aim) – Lore cards that increases a units attack dice rolled will work for all attacks that unit makes during the turn (so both attacks from darken the skies will be increased). Mass might and the other spells that increase attack dice work too, but they can be more effective if used to help break a formation in melee combat.[/quote]

I thought you could only play one lore card on your turn (and one on your opponents turn)?

Thanks for the great article!
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Eric Hautemont
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Re: My Approach to Battlelore – Part 1
Darken the Skies being a Tactic (Command) card, I think he was referring to Tactic/Lore cards combos, not to Lore/Lore combos.
GREAT article, btw!
Eric @ DoW
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Gabe Alvaro
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Re: My Approach to Battlelore – Part 1
What a great article Jay. Looks like some good beginnings to an ambitious undertaking. Looking forward to part 2. If you address creatures, war councils, and landmarks by the time you've addressed everything else, you'll have something pretty epic by the time you are finished.

So far, I'm pretty much in agreement with your observations and find myself taking a similar conservative approach to strategy. I've been ruminating over much the same things that you've so methodically layed out in this treatise. But more specifically, I was trying to understand the potential factors of different command cards for what I deem the different purposes of attack and adjustment.

Certain cards, e.g. Advance, Darken the Skies, Mounted Charge, Counter Attack are quite obviously best used when pressing the attack. While others, e.g. Patrol and especially Scout are clearly meant for the purposes of adjusting one's lines. I think this is what you are getting at when you say, "I like to try to use up the 1 and 2 order command cards to adjust my formations and hopefully draw into better cards to replace them." Which is what I like to do as well. I believe it is one of the most important, and easy to execute, keys to a successful strategy.

But what of cards like On the March (1|1|1), Forward (2|2|2), Surround (2|0|2)? These lack the necessary elements of control one seeks in a premium big order command card. But clearly they can accomplish a lot on the battlefield (3,4, and 6 orders each!). In light of a conservative approach and an understanding of the best use for a given command card, might these be seen as big order adjustment cards, rather than big order attack cards? One might be tempted to keep them for an unforeseen attack opportunity, but I believe command card slots are too valuable to give away for a just-in-case play. I'd much prefer to use my slots for more certain control.

Also, I'd love to hear your take on the banner color tactics command cards. If I am seeking an amount of control that could be gained from these cards it seems that they would work best if my like colored units were at least adjacent to each other, or even better in supported formations. All too often, I get a Blue Banners card only to find that my blues are scattered across the battle field. It would seem that a player could adjust formations in the early game to get like colored units adjacent in order to provide some control, and thus attack capability. Or is it better to just leave the banner color command cards to an adjustment play, should they happen to come up? Also, the fact that there are only two each of these cards in the deck may speak to their marginal situational-based utility. Any thoughts on these?
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Brian Baird
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Re: My Approach to Battlelore – Part 1
Erich wrote:
Darken the Skies being a Tactic (Command) card, I think he was referring to Tactic/Lore cards combos, not to Lore/Lore combos.
GREAT article, btw!
Eric @ DoW

Doh! Bad memory on my part.
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Jay Borden
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blindspot wrote:
But more specifically, I was trying to understand the potential factors of different command cards for what I deem the different purposes of attack and adjustment

Gabe: You turn a phrase far better than me, so I’ll quote your comment from the ‘How to minimize luck’ post too:

blindspot wrote:
Support is defined as being adjacent to two other units. One gains support for their units by judicious use of command cards to constantly adjust their formations throughout the course of the game. It is because of this need for adjustment that I declare there is no defense in BattleLore, only adjustment.

I typically adjust my lines on offensive actions even more than I do on what I consider defensive actions (withdrawing and regrouping). While the “he that rolls more dice wins” is usually a true statement, both players will often roll about the same amount of dice during the game (assuming neither player will leave a unit unsupported if possible). Constantly adjusting your lines to spread the taken wounds out across different units is one of the big points I’m hoping to be able to explain in my next article.

I don’t limit the use of certain cards to a role of just ‘adjustment card’ or ‘attack card’. I try to find the most effective card for the current situation (while trying to conserve resources if they would not be used to thier full potential). I don’t think you limit cards to black or white extremes either, but I need to add that note before I give my take on the points you bring up with your other comments.


blindspot wrote:
Certain cards, e.g. Advance, Darken the Skies, Mounted Charge, Counter Attack are quite obviously best used when pressing the attack. While others, e.g. Patrol and especially Scout are clearly meant for the purposes of adjusting one's lines.

I agree with the above statements, but just want to clarify my thoughts a bit more. The big orders are best used when pressing the attack because they allow you to fully adjust exactly how your troops line up so you can concentrate attacks or set up on a weak point. Those big orders also allow you to rotate out a wounded unit to a support position while still having enough orders to get a fresh unit in front and attacking.

At the start of the game, scout and cards with only 2 orders should be used to adjust formations (save the better resources for later). Once units are in base to base, the scout and 2 order cards can still be used to make attacks or adjust the forward line too, they just don’t usually have the same impact as a 3+ order card (so they are usually saved for clean up after the conflict since better cards will hopefully be available).

blindspot wrote:
But what of cards like On the March (1|1|1), Forward (2|2|2), Surround (2|0|2)? These lack the necessary elements of control one seeks in a premium big order command card.

As much as we can hope to play 0|3|0; 0|C|0; 0|C|0; blue banner; all in a row every game, it’s much more likely to be 3 turns of 1-3 order cards played while closing, with 1 or 2 big orders played when the lines meet. After the initial attack, it's usually followed up with random orders when they are available.

No matter how much I try to force the conflicts only where I am strong with command cards, it’s inevitable that there will be other flanks that need attention throughout the game. The split flank commands (along with the color banner cards) are perfect keeping your main conflict active while regrouping an odd unit or getting in an extra archer shot.

blindspot wrote:
Also, I'd love to hear your take on the banner color tactics command cards. If I am seeking an amount of control that could be gained from these cards it seems that they would work best if my like colored units were at least adjacent to each other, or even better in supported formations.

The banner color cards are really dependent on the scenario. The blue banners are usually a great big order since they are the most common troop color for most of the scenarios. The green and red are usually much less desired.

The banner color cards are a good example for the “look for set up and follow up actions” rule. It’s not likely you’ll have 6 blue units in a formation together, but 2 or 3 units in the same current conflict are enough to make it worth it (the other orders can help get reinforcements into the main conflict, regroup units in other flanks, or set up the next conflict)


I’m trying to get beyond the standard “use the best card for the situation” explanations. I hope to better address the way I adjust my line while advancing better in the next article. Once I have a few examples, it will hopefully be clearer that even only 1 or 2 orders issued can effectively keep your advantage while in base to base.
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G. Uitz
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Outstanding article, Jay!

Well written and stuffed with information.

The BL community rocks.

Dark.
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Gabe Alvaro
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Thanks for the response Jay.

Quote:
The split flank commands (along with the color banner cards) are perfect keeping your main conflict active while regrouping an odd unit or getting in an extra archer shot.
This seems to indicate you would advocate more on the side of holding on to them until main conflict. I'll hold off engaging debate on this point.

It seems your take is more fluid, while mine is more static. Since, as we well know, BL is a more fluid game, this bodes well for part 2. I'm looking forward to it.
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Marshall Miller
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By the time you are done I may have to purchase a copy of BL, print out your articles, and put them in the box....
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Mike
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Great article. I am going to add this page to my favorites for reference.
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gab zéta
France
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hi,
this great article is now translated in french! there are 6 posts and also a PDF on my memeblog

merci, ciao!

i'm now working on the part 2! thank's to the planetsmasher!
 
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Gabe Alvaro
United States
Berkeley
California
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zagtag wrote:
hi,
this great article is now translated in french! there are 6 posts and also a PDF on my memeblog

merci, ciao!
You see that! They love you in France Jay! kiss
And you thought nobody was reading.

Now where's that part III?
 
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Talorien
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Thank you for this article.

These 3 are by far the best articles I've read on BL.

meeple
 
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