Recommend
12 
 Thumb up
 Hide
4 Posts

Hordes of the Things» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Wargame for your Wife? rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
F H
United Kingdom
UK
flag msg tools
designer
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
I'm a big fan of Hordes of the Things. The reason is very simple. It's the only miniatures wargame my wife would play with me.

History does not interest her.

Careful balancing of forces does not interest her.

Statistical analysis of relative force constituents does not interest her.

Playing with the "cute little monsters" DOES INTEREST HER!

Now it might sound like I'm patronising her, and your right. However my little collection of strange/weird/funny/cute monsters is what drew her in.

At first we played with me explaining the details of the rules and how they applied at each stage.

Now we are a few games in and I dont have to explain anything. Now she "builds" her armies by selecting the fantasy creatures she likes best, OR if I've built my army first she considers it and then picks what is most likely to trounce my forces.

What can take a woman with no interest in wargaming through initiation into a considered and skilled wargamer?

The answer is "Hordes of the Things".

These rules are what clinched the deal. Sure the mini's brought her in, but the easy to grasp easy to follow rules are what caught her.

The rules set is only 40 pages long, 20 pages of that is made up of army lists so dont expect a huge swath of rules. This however is a bonus and not a penalty. The very shortness of the rules is be appreciated.

This is a fantasy set of rules. However unlike many other fantasy rules systems that give you statistics for every possible race and creature these rules instead categorise all creatures into 21 categories. Even this number is not a lot to handle. Each category is named for instance you have Dragon, Hero, God, Riders, Lurkers, Blades. These are easy to remember and a couple of games in you can remember the effects and abilities that each has.

These categories are very versatile. For instance you might catagorise a Cannon Armed Air Boat as a "Dragon". A "Blades" unit can represent a units of Dwarves with Axes as well as a group of sword armed Humans. So in effect you catagorise a unit by its abilities rather than the weapons its carrying.

Basing of units is a dream. The rules give you a base width and a suggested base depth. The base width varies with the scale you are using. The depth can vary if your minis have an awkward shape. The rules suggest a number of minis for each base. For instance a Blades base only holds 4 figures, and a Dragon 1.

Army sizes vary as they are "built" from bases until a total of 24 is reached, and as you might imagine the differn't types of units have differnt costs.

Turns are taken alternately. During your turn you roll a die that gives you a number of pips. Each pip can be used to move a single base or a group of bases if they are in edge to edge contact.

This feature means if the luck is not with you, you might find that your army is pretty much immobile. You have to prepare by good inital placement.

Combat is also a dream. Both sides roll a die. Each base-type has a bonus that gets added to the die but this varies with the base type of the unit its in combat with. This again sounds complicated but is very simple to use. As well as this simple table there are some tactical factors that can also effect the total.

The results of combat are also very simple. The loser either stands, retreats, runs away, or is destroyed. Simple but effective.

Moving your bases and the placement thereof is where the skill comes into this game. Placeing your bases in mutual support, taking advantage of the terrain which is the bread and butter of the wargamer all apply under these rules as you would hope.

What is great about these rules, is thier versitality ( I've seen army lists for everything from WWI British to Garden Gnomes! ) and thier beautiful simplicity. When showing someone the rules they might puzzle at the obscure text in some of the paragraphs, but a quick demo explains all, and the combat/movement tables are so simple they act as no barrier what so ever.

A great fun set of rules.





12 
 Thumb up
0.25
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Mike Ricotta
United States
Virginia Beach
Virginia
flag msg tools
designer
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
that's cool...my wife saw some miniatures at the sore and said that was way to "nerdy" for her...but she does enjoy Battle Lore!
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
John M
United States
flag msg tools
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Fully agree! My gal skirts games that are too 'wargamey,' but likes HOTTS for the same reasons you mention.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
p55carroll
United States
Minnesota
flag msg tools
What's "story" got to do with it?
badge
"Drizzle, drazzle, drozzle, drome; time for this one to come home."
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
FNH1 wrote:

What is great about these rules, is thier versitality ( I've seen army lists for everything from WWI British to Garden Gnomes! ) and thier beautiful simplicity. . . .


I bought HOTT thinking I'd use the rules to design Zulu War scenarios like Rorke's Drift, where a handful of British riflemen (Shooters?) held off mass attacks by Zulu warriors (Hordes?).

If you don't use miniatures, HOTT can simulate (in a very broad-stroke way) any military conflict from any time, any place.

I've owned the rulebook for a long time, but I've yet to do much with it. Now I'm getting inspired to create my dream of a generic army (painted bases with unit-type symbols) and start designing and playing some games.

Then, once I'm into it, I'll probably do a little something with miniatures too--maybe to lure my wife into playing HOTT with me.
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.