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Subject: Get Adler in the Classroom rss

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Nathan M
United States
Knoxville
TN
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I teach elementary-aged dyslexic children. As such, I am always on the lookout for games that I can play with them that require a minimum amount of reading and a maximum amount of deep thinking. This game was generously given to me by the publisher for my classroom. Before that I had never heard of it. I was blown away with his generosity! This game fits my criteria perfectly, with no reading load and a deep level of strategy and deduction skills.

The Theme:

It is London in 1937. Intelligence has discovered Top-Secret document are missing along with Agent Adler. A message has been intercepted that simply says, “Trafalgar at seven.” Now are heroes must track down and stop Adler from escaping with the secret documents.

The Basics:

Get Adler is for 4-8 players. At 4 players, only Agent Adler is on the villain team. The good team is made up of Inspector Sharpe, Agent Gold, and Constable Townsend. The fifth player joins the villain team with Kate Collins. The sixth player joins the good team with Agent Tarasov. The seventh player joins the villain team with “The Mole”. The eighth player joins the good team with Agent Bonnet.


There are cards for the 4-player game and more cards are added for each new player.

There is no communication about the game while it is in process (hints, talking about cards, etc.)

The game is in two parts. The first part is a game of deduction in trying to find out who the villain team is. On their turn, players draw a card and discard a card, using its effect, if any. For the first three rounds, no accusations can be made. This is the time to try to discover who the villains are and optimize the cards in your hand if possible.

Sometime in round 4 or after one of the good team’s characters can attempt to arrest another character. If the arrested character is a member of the good team, both players lose a turn. If the arrested player is on the villain team (it doesn’t matter who it is) everyone flips their identity cards face up and the second part of the game commences.

In the second part of the game, the good team is trying to arrest the villain team and eliminate them from the game. An arrest card is played on a villain player. That villain player has several options. They can try to escape by playing an escape method (boat, car, bike, etc.). If they do, any of the good team players can take up the chase by playing a matching transportation method. Then the villain must try to escape again. A second method to try to escape is to play a disguise. The disguise works automatically. A third method to try to escape is to play a bomb card. The bomb is a powerful card for the villains as is makes all the good players miss their next turn. The last ditch effort to escape is to engage in a gun battle. The the villain player and the good player who arrested or the last good player to play a pursuit card are in a gun battle. Gun battles are one-on-one. There are three outcomes to a gun battle. 1. If the villain plays more gun cards than the good player, the good player is eliminated from the game and the villain escapes. 2. If the good player plays more gun cards than the villain player, the villain player is eliminated. 3. If the good player and the villain player play the exact same number of gun cards, neither player is eliminated and the villain player escapes. After any arrest attempt, all players involved draw back up to seven cards.

The heroes win if all the villains are arrested or eliminated before the end of the 7th hour or if any of the villains escape but do not possess any secret documents.

The villains win if one of the villains survives the 7th hour and has a secret document or if all the heroes are eliminated.

Other cards:
The magnifying glass lets you look at all of another player’s cards.
The binoculars let you steal a random card from another player and must give them a card in return.
The question mark card allows you to ask a question of another player or take an extra turn if the roles are revealed.
The arrest card can be discarded and new cards drawn for villains immediately once identities are revealed.


My thoughts:

I really enjoy this game! What’s even more important to me is that my students (age 7-10) really enjoy this game and ask to play it! I admittedly break the “no table-talk” rule to make sure they are thinking through the clues that they receive.

How well either side does depend a little on the cards they get at the initial shuffle as there isn’t a way to dump your hand to get rid of a bunch of cards that you don’t need. Heroes never use secret plans so if you are dealt a handful of them, you are basically out of luck. However, on the whole, it ends up being a pretty balanced game.

I’ve played with each player count and it has been about 50-50 with heroes and villains winning. In fact, we played one game with 5 players that on the last turn was down to Adler and Agent Gold. Adler had avoided arrest 3 times and was going to get away because Gold was out of arrest cards. On her last turn, Gold drew an arrest, and Adler was out of escapes and guns. It came down to the last draw on the last turn! It was amazing!

One of the fun things I add with my students is that they get to tell everyone what the Top Secret document is whenever one is discarded. We’ve had some fun ideas that they’ve come up with (Krabby Patties recipe, KFC recipe, a map to buried treasure, video game cheat codes, and more). It can be a very exciting game if you want to make it exciting! Another fun thing we do is make it ominous each time we remove the next clock from the round marker stack. It adds to the tension as the villains wait for their chance to escape and the heroes see their time to capture the villains slipping away!

I highly recommend this game! It is a great little party game with deduction and preparation at the beginning of the game and some frantic pursuit of the villains at the end of the game.

Check out my Review Writing Challange.
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Peter Barringer
United States
Evansville
Indiana
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My high school students love this game, too. It's a hidden gem, and I hope more people start hearing about it.
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Nathan M
United States
Knoxville
TN
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z10n x wrote:
My high school students love this game, too. It's a hidden gem, and I hope more people start hearing about it.


Agreed! It's a fun game and deserves a wider audience!
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Randall Thompson
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It really warms our hearts to hear of young kids
in this 7-10 age group and of Peter's students in the
17/18 yr old ages, enjoying Get Adler!

We knew adults liked it, as they were the main playtesters, but
we did not playtest with kids and teens. This is a great
confirmation for us. And we appreciate the detailed critiques
as it helps us a lot for future adjustments.

p.s. my partner and I always think that kids will like something
if we do, because we are big kids ourselves. She just reminded me
of that. We basically knew it was aimed at everyone.

Thank you very much,

Randall
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