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Subject: A Mid-point Review rss

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Paul Ferguson
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Please Note - To this point I have only played 6 of the 12 games required to complete Charterstone.

Charterstone is at its heart a very mild and simple worker placement game, with a progression system or a "Legacy" system integrated into the mechanics to provided, a unique and interesting experience.

Gameplay -

The first game of Charterstone felt like the most simple and monotonous worker placement I had ever played. Due to the lack of places to perform actions in the first game, the experience was one that felt like a dumbed down version of the most simple WP I had ever played. As the game progresses over each of the 12 sessions (6 so far for me), the game does increase the complexity, and options, but only to a point where it still feels like a very average and watered down experience.

It is possible that the next 6 games, will change the game dramatically, but due to the number of things I have already seen in game, I have my doubts it will improve much over what I have already experienced. I do hope something new and innovative comes out of the last 6 games, otherwise this is really just a very average WP game, with a slapped on progression system.


Legacy / Progression system -

The Legacy system has all the usual elements, you can write on the board - name parts of the town, you can write on the cards - name people, put new rule / stickers into the rule book , add new cards to the decks, and place stickers on the board which provide new action spaces for players to use. It also adds a few more things in as it progresses, but I don't want to spoil it for those that haven't played the game yet. For the most part, it hasn't added anything innovative to the WP genre or the Legacy genre to date. Each round has a slight variation on the goal for players. Mostly it is a simple goal of having the most X to gain X points.


Session to Session transition -

As the game is played over 12 sessions, you will at times want to lose a session to gain an ability to you assist in future games. Some of the abilities allow you to store more left over resources from the previous round. This can give you a pretty big head start for the future sessions and is a good strategy to head for, as it will save you actions in future plays. Each game starts the same way, and generally ends the same way, there isn't a lot of variation in sessions.


Odd design choices - Very Mild Spoiler Ahead

At the end of the 6th game, the goal card of the session, which changes each round, put a big halt on the player that had scored the least running total points up to the 6th session. Basically, the player that had scored the least, is now not able to win the game, and has certain restrictions placed on them for future sessions. They do have a chance to regain the chance to win the overall game, but they have to jump though a bunch of hoops for the privilege. I really don't get the point of this design decision as it is punishing the player already behind and forcing them to make pre-defined choices if they want to get back in the goods books. Some players are going to get annoyed by this, as there is no warning that this is going to occur.

Recommend it?

After 6 plays, I would say no. It's a very average WP game, with very, very weak Legacy aspects slapped on. The core elements of the game are not unique, or fresh or try to push the boundaries of the genre in any way. All the games feel exactly the same each round. Go to the same locations to gain points, money or resources, rinse and repeat for 12 sessions. It feels like the designer just picked whatever was the popular thing at the moment, and rolled with it. Maybe the next 6 session will blow me away, but I have my doubts as we have opened nearly all of the boxes, and cards, and what we saw were just slightly different versions of the same things.





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Iain Brown
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Spoiler for game 6

Spoiler (click to reveal)
The “odd design choice” is a catch-up mechanic. That player now gets to go on the reputation track every time he plays. And what’s the guidepost conditin for the next game? Yup, have most tokens on the reputation track.

The timing of spending those resources to be allowed to win the game is interesting. You probably want to wait until game 12, but that’s obviously risky as something could happen in the last game to stop this happening.

I quite like it as a catch up mechanic.
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Chris Leigh
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This review captures my feelings so so closely. Its all very meh!

We got to mission 6 (two player and one automa) but can't really face another 6 games of blandness. We went back to near and far's campaign which is much more compelling.

It feels so much like the legacy element was entirely built to cash in on the legacy trend. The paths to unlock all have similar features, it doesn't progress the story at all and the stuff it does unlock I often find thematically wonky too...

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Rich A
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I guess to be fair it isn't meant to be a heavy complex game. I was under the impression this was aimed at families and broad appeal which is no bad thing. I do think it's worth it in any review acknowledging a game's intention to give a rounded picture. But anyway it's good to see a different perspective as there aren't many reviews so far.
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Tom Stearns
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I'll provide an alternative view. Played the first 4 games yesterday, 3 players no automa. All three of us are experienced heavy gamers. Only one of us has ever played a legacy type game before.

We really enjoyed the overall experience. I think this is a really well designed game. Target audience is probably families or folks who enjoy lighter games. That being said I would recommend an experienced gamer to lead the game. The way the game introduces rules and uses the card index will surely confuse inexperienced gamers.

It is a WP game. Not recommended for those who don't enjoy worker placement. However, one of our three is a notorious nose down on WP games in general, and he really enjoyed Charterstone. I don't think the game is as bland as the OP states, though it definitely doesn't seem to be his cup of tea. The game is thematic. The game has quality components. The game has twists and surprises. Each game has variability. The game does offer choices as to how to accumulate VP's. One game one player chose to ignore the guidepost goal and just accumulate VP's regardless of the guidepost. He won that game.

So often when I read a review, I get the feeling that the real criticism isn't that the game is bad, but that the game isn't what the reviewer wants it to be. That seems to be the case here.

Also one last thing. A sign of a good game for me is, do I want to immediately play the game again. With Charterstone we played 4 consecutive games. Had we more time we would have continued playing. As it is, we are getting together next Saturday to carry on. In comparison, someone mentioned Near and Far as being more interesting. I have Near and Fear. Kickstarted it in fact. I'm a huge Ryan Laukat fan and own most all his games. Same for Jamey btw. Anyway, I have campaign of Near and Far going, but it just doesn't generate that feeling of "gotta play it again right away." Not saying it's not good because it is very good. But Charterstone had that "I don't want to quit playing" feel to it.

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Chris Leigh
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I don't see how you can say its really thematic.

Spoiler (click to reveal)
The buildings seem very random, spa, cat cafe, haunted house? etc. etc. How does a cat operate a building? A ghost? Where are the ghosts from? How can you "build" a haunted house?


I love worker placement, Caverna is amazing, but any of Uwe's are good, and Viticulture is easily in my top 10.

I just don't see the point of legacy here. There are minimal twists and surprises outside of this thing at game 6, and it just annoyed the last player.

Spoiler (click to reveal)
The first time we unlocked a new worker, we thought it was pretty cool, and as close to a surprise as you could get (although I'm still unconvinced a cat cafe really has a place in this setting) but then the ghosts came out and its the exact same thing, same for robots.

Likewise the treasures, cool to see, but then you realise there is no story behind them coming out really, there is no variety between scroll to scroll all of them do the same thing...
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Tom Stearns
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blunder1983 wrote:
I don't see how you can say its really thematic.

Spoiler (click to reveal)
The buildings seem very random, spa, cat cafe, haunted house? etc. etc. How does a cat operate a building? A ghost? Where are the ghosts from? How can you "build" a haunted house?


I love worker placement, Caverna is amazing, but any of Uwe's are good, and Viticulture is easily in my top 10.

I just don't see the point of legacy here. There are minimal twists and surprises outside of this thing at game 6, and it just annoyed the last player.

Spoiler (click to reveal)
The first time we unlocked a new worker, we thought it was pretty cool, and as close to a surprise as you could get (although I'm still unconvinced a cat cafe really has a place in this setting) but then the ghosts came out and its the exact same thing, same for robots.

Likewise the treasures, cool to see, but then you realise there is no story behind them coming out really, there is no variety between scroll to scroll all of them do the same thing...


The theme is to build and expand a village for the king. The games mechanics definitely fit the theme. Have you no imagination? Are you unable to suspend reality to enjoy a game? Again I don't think the problem is the game. It appears the game is a bad fit for some players. The game evolves even from a rules perspective. So you can't count on each game playing by the same rules. That in and of itself leads to twists and surprises. The guideposts provide some twists to victory conditions every game. Are you telling me that opening crates to see what new buildings, persona's, minions, etc get revealed isn't a surprise?

I guess our definitions of fun, twists, surprises and thematic games are different. Which is okay. Not all games are for everyone. Doesn't make the game bad, just makes it a bad fit. And that needs to be differentiated in a review.

I enjoy worker placement as well, but I'm not a Uwe fan. Much prefer Feld. Also enjoy jamey and ryan's games as mentioned before.
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Tim Royal
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blunder1983 wrote:
I don't see how you can say its really thematic.

Spoiler (click to reveal)
The buildings seem very random, spa, cat cafe, haunted house? etc. etc. How does a cat operate a building? A ghost? Where are the ghosts from? How can you "build" a haunted house?



The spoiler information you reveal above, which I read, instantly says 'thematic' to me. Maybe not a 'coherent' thematic, but thematic nonetheless.

Enough I just ordered a copy, because I'm all in if the game has the things you mention in the spoiler.

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Jo Bartok
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6 boring sessions wouldn‘t even justify 6 great sessions
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Antigone Mendenhall
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I am kind of with you on this one. The more I try to like it the more I don't. I find several of the mechanics to be awkward.

There are definitely themes, but that is one of my biggest disconnects. At first I thought when I took on the grain charter that I would be working on growing grain, building a brewery, and opening a bakery, etc. As it turns out, anyone can build those things, so I grow grain and my ore mining neighbor can build my bakery. It feels like the theme continuity is in there somewhere, but askewed by the randomness of what you actually get to build.

The minions are weird. The card says to get a bonus when your minion building is used. It doesn't mean that though. By the card it should refer to Ghost House, Cat Cafe, etc. It actually refers to whatever building a minion is on. I feel like the rules aren't very clear in a lot of situations.

On that note, our group missed a key rule early on which allowed us to play a funner game. After learning what we did wrong, we played one long boring game before shelving it.

 
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Tom Stearns
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Well if it’s boring why would you play 6 games? Pretty sure you should know after the first 2-3 games whether it’s a game for you or not. Again the games not the problem.
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Matthew Coppel
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Nagara_Venteel wrote:
I am kind of with you on this one. The more I try to like it the more I don't. I find several of the mechanics to be awkward.

There are definitely themes, but that is one of my biggest disconnects. At first I thought when I took on the grain charter that I would be working on growing grain, building a brewery, and opening a bakery, etc. As it turns out, anyone can build those things, so I grow grain and my ore mining neighbor can build my bakery. It feels like the theme continuity is in there somewhere, but askewed by the randomness of what you actually get to build.

The minions are weird. The card says to get a bonus when your minion building is used. It doesn't mean that though. By the card it should refer to Ghost House, Cat Cafe, etc. It actually refers to whatever building a minion is on. I feel like the rules aren't very clear in a lot of situations.

On that note, our group missed a key rule early on which allowed us to play a funner game. After learning what we did wrong, we played one long boring game before shelving it.



This seems to be an ongoing problem with not the game, but the players. Rules are often read wrong, or not read thouroughly enough. The card makes and rules for minions made it very clear that you get the minion bonus when you place the minion and when an opponent visits the location where your minion is. Looking over the forums there are way to many people either not reading the cards at all, fully, or not reading and examining the cards rules and abilities untill they understand them.

Just from thhe very basic rules for example you learn that you pay what is on the left and get what is on the right, but I see rules questions all over about this simple rule, how hard is it to understand that rule.
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Narciso Jaramillo
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gohrns wrote:
We really enjoyed the overall experience. I think this is a really well designed game. Target audience is probably families or folks who enjoy lighter games. That being said I would recommend an experienced gamer to lead the game. The way the game introduces rules and uses the card index will surely confuse inexperienced gamers.


I think you hit the nail on the head here. I can definitely see why the game might not appeal to gamers who like medium-to-heavy games. But my family fits your description exactly - my wife and daughter are not as experienced gamers, and I'm usually the one who explains rules and "runs" the games even when we're competing.

For us, Charterstone is perfect; the bump-not-block mechanic and the gradual complexity ramp really worked for my wife and daughter, and I can see that their skills have been growing from game to game. The differences from game to game help give them a secondary focus, so they don't get into a lot of "what do I do now" situations, and the fact that we added the buildings over time ourselves makes it easier to keep track of all the available actions despite how many there are.

I also agree that it would be tougher for a group that doesn't have at least one rules lawyer

So the game is very well designed for us, but I can definitely see that it could feel more simplistic for a more experienced group (especially one used to the complexity of Uwe games or other Stonemaier games).

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Antigone Mendenhall
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mcoppel wrote:
Nagara_Venteel wrote:
I am kind of with you on this one. The more I try to like it the more I don't. I find several of the mechanics to be awkward.

There are definitely themes, but that is one of my biggest disconnects. At first I thought when I took on the grain charter that I would be working on growing grain, building a brewery, and opening a bakery, etc. As it turns out, anyone can build those things, so I grow grain and my ore mining neighbor can build my bakery. It feels like the theme continuity is in there somewhere, but askewed by the randomness of what you actually get to build.

The minions are weird. The card says to get a bonus when your minion building is used. It doesn't mean that though. By the card it should refer to Ghost House, Cat Cafe, etc. It actually refers to whatever building a minion is on. I feel like the rules aren't very clear in a lot of situations.

On that note, our group missed a key rule early on which allowed us to play a funner game. After learning what we did wrong, we played one long boring game before shelving it.



This seems to be an ongoing problem with not the game, but the players. Rules are often read wrong, or not read thouroughly enough. The card makes and rules for minions made it very clear that you get the minion bonus when you place the minion and when an opponent visits the location where your minion is. Looking over the forums there are way to many people either not reading the cards at all, fully, or not reading and examining the cards rules and abilities untill they understand them.

Just from thhe very basic rules for example you learn that you pay what is on the left and get what is on the right, but I see rules questions all over about this simple rule, how hard is it to understand that rule.


Because nowhere on the card does it say the building the minion stands on. The reference card does not specify whether it is the building the minion is on, or the building related to the minion. It should say " the building where the minion is located". It does not, and given the amount of people confused by it, I don't feel at fault at all.
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Morten Monrad Pedersen
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First of all thank you for the review. It's great to have both positive and negative info about the game out there to inform potential buyers.

Second, as a Stonemaier Games employee I won't add my own subjective and biased opinion, but I'll comment on the provide context for the design choice you mention as punishing the player who's behind: It's not there to punish the player who's behind, quite the contrary it was included as a catch-up mechanic that helps the player.

I'm doing this both to provide context for the readers and to explain the design choice you mention you find odd, since you mind find that interesting.

Quote:
Spoiler (click to reveal)
At the end of the 6th game, the goal card of the session, which changes each round, put a big halt on the player that had scored the least running total points up to the 6th session. Basically, the player that had scored the least, is now not able to win the game, and has certain restrictions placed on them for future sessions. They do have a chance to regain the chance to win the overall game, but they have to jump though a bunch of hoops for the privilege.


Spoiler (click to reveal)
There are two effects here:
1) The player can't win unless he does 1 of 5 things within the remaining 6 games. 4 of those 5 things basically takes 1 action and a small cost, which is a slight disadvantage in 1 out of 6 games.
2) An effect that gives the player a benefit multiple times during each game until he does 1 of the 5 actions mentioned above.


Overall, it's a push-your-luck catch-up mechanic. The player will have an advantage over the other players (not a huge one, but definitely an advantage), but the longer he wants to keep that advantage the larger the risk to him.

Again, I'm not writing this to start a discussion or to argue, but to provide context and I hope it explains the design decision you find odd.
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Eric Matthews
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One common theme I’m seeing with the middling to negative reviews of Charterstone is an expectation of big story and surprises in the campaign despite everything in the marketing focusing on a cute worker placement game that is solid after the campaign and not, like Pandemic Legacy, the linear story.

Big story really relies on a lot of control by the author; that’s why video games with strong story tend to be on rails, and games with super customizable characters and lots of open world choices necessarily have weaker stories.

And yet most reviewers seem to be coming in to focus on this campaigns story with only a footnote at most on how the game plays AFTER the campaign, which is, after all, the prime differentiator of this game from other legacy games.

I see this game having more in common with Fabled Fruit than Pandemic Legacy personally.

In short I find mid-campaign reviews of a legacy games should be taken with a grain of salt in the same way reviews of games half-played. There’s value there, but we should remember the review is incomplete. It’s like tasting the dough of an unbaked bread.

Hopefully, in time, when more people have been able to finish the campaign and report on post-campaign plays, we’ll get some more complete reviews. Of course if the campaign games themselves really are dull then maybe we won’t ever see those.
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Tom Rhyne
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The “it’s not the game, it’s the players” counterpoint fails to accept that games do have an impact on how the rules are explained and comprehended. This game has a lot of subtle administrata. I’m convinced looking at the “average” scores that many groups aren’t reading them all correctly.

There’s a language issue, and the fact that the rules have to be presented as a sort of appendix rather than a manual due to the evolving and mutable nature of them.

It can be frustrating to find you missed something subtly two games ago.


However, I get the main point. This needs to be a self-selecting game. If you’re a min-maxxer, the simple fact that ties are amicably resolved probably first signifies this isn’t meant to be that type of atmosphere. It’s a good lightweight game with versatility and some cute features. It isn’t trying to be Axis and Allies. If you like to plan several minutes each round, you’re going to find it very slow.

It has randomness. It also has reward for strategic decisions, both immediately and in long term planning. I can see why it’s well liked by those that like it and disliked by those who dislike it. It’s simply not for everyone.

My one main critique is that for the people it IS for, who are by definition (or at least mostly) less interested in large complicated administrata, they may find learning it and perfectly following every nuance difficult. It is, to me, a lightweight game with overly complicated special case situations that are explained in a non-linear, expansive, somewhat chaotic manner that don’t resemble most lightweight games.
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Narciso Jaramillo
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Trhyne wrote:
The “it’s not the game, it’s the players” counterpoint fails to accept that games do have an impact on how the rules are explained and comprehended. This game has a lot of subtle administrata. I’m convinced looking at the “average” scores that many groups aren’t reading them all correctly.


I'm curious which rules you think are likely to be played incorrectly (partly because maybe we're doing so ) - could you spoiler-tag them? I haven't personally felt like there's anything too confusing or error-prone, although we did make a couple of mistakes with

Spoiler (click to reveal)
not remembering that the cards/minions you save between games have to be of different types
.
 
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Darin Bolyard
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notwebsafe wrote:
I'm curious which rules you think are likely to be played incorrectly...

As of writing this, we have completed game 7. We have run into multiple rules ambiguities which are only clarified (or modified?) by the FAQ or call a situation into question from a game balance perspective:
Spoiler (click to reveal)
Rule 15 states "If you can't pay the cost, you can't place a worker here." Rule 16 (Minions) states "A minion is a type of worker...All cards that refer to 'workers' apply to both regular workers and minions." Yet, despite the clear indication by rule 15, comboed with the indication that a minion is a worker for all intents and purposes, both the golem and the chef can be placed even if you cannot pay the cost, as long as their bonus grants you the cost to place there. This latter ruling was given in the official FAQ.

Spoiler (click to reveal)
Rule 13 states "Friend cards give you a bonus when you use a building in a specific charter." This is clear enough, but the friend cards themselves are worded differently: "Whenever you use a building in this charter to gain X, gain +1 X." The rule as stated in the chronicle makes it clear enough that you could use the cat, for example, to gain two points every time you place it in your charter (provided you have the appropriate friend in your supply) no matter what the building itself grants you. However, the text on friend cards seems to indicate that you may only gain the bonus if the building itself grants X. This latter understanding is further supported by the use of persona cards which only give a bonus when using a building which requires a specific resource (feels like the opposite thing happening), and not merely when you use the specified resource. You wouldn't benefit from one of those personas when you place a worker at the treasury, for example. And here again, the official FAQ includes a ruling that indicates that you get the friend bonus per the written rule, not per the wording on the friend card. This is definitely confusing when you consider the common trend in card-driven games wherein card text trumps rules text. If you've ever played Viticulture (another Stegmaier title), this concept is very loud with the numerous and varied visitor cards. If there's a way to break a rule in Viticulture, there's a visitor card that does it.

Spoiler (click to reveal)
We're still uncertain about the correct way to play the glory bonus which grants a capacity. I've searched for an official answer from Jamey here on the forums, and have yet to find one. We have been playing it thus: At the end of each game, any player with the capacity glory bonus gets to keep one additional resource/coin/card/minion ("/" = "or") of his/her choice. We felt that gaining an additional capacity at the start of each game would have been grossly out of line with the other bonuses. As a "wild" capacity slot, we find it on par with the others which require the same number of glory starts to acquire. We realize that it goes against the setup rules which indicate you receive these bonuses at the start. It just doesn't feel right to get an additional capacity EVERY game after gaining the bonus. Not such a big deal if someone chose it in the latter few games, but one of us chose it as his very first. And he did so with the wild capacity option in mind.
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FWIW, I am enjoying the game. However, there was one game wherein we had a couple minor disputes, one of which was about the ruling mentioned in the first spoiler box in my above post. Prior to discovering the FAQ, the table was split (2 and 2) on whether a player should be able to...
Spoiler (click to reveal)
...place his golem in order to gain the required resource in order to then use in paying the building's cost. Because the rules better supported not being able to do this, his play was shut down, which naturally put a kink in his plans, and left him unsettled.

Then we found the FAQ and the ruling on this↑, which began to put a small blight on that particular session. We moved on of course. But then later in that same session, the same player, based on the previously discovered official ruling, then tried to place a worker in order to claim...
Spoiler (click to reveal)
a peril token, and then use it as part of that placement and cash it in for points.
This second play by him was almost immediately accepted by the whole table based upon the former placement issue ruling until I revisited the rules about...
Spoiler (click to reveal)
...peril tokens. The rules explicitly state: "When you use a building with a peril token on it, after you gain the benefit, you must also gain the peril token. And so, he wasn't allowed to make this play.
And despite the fact that the rules were once again clear as far as we could see, we were deep in doubt about the reliability of the chronicle, and wasted precious time seeking the FAQ just to ensure we were playing correctly, instead of simply following the written rules with confidence. This bolded portion has been my biggest beef so far. Unlocking rules is part of the fun. But when issues arise which call the rules into question, and to such an extent as to merit what appears more like an addendum than an FAQ, the fun and anticipation that comes with unlocking new rules is diminished a bit.
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gohrns wrote:

So often when I read a review, I get the feeling that the real criticism isn't that the game is bad, but that the game isn't what the reviewer wants it to be. That seems to be the case here.

Also one last thing. A sign of a good game for me is, do I want to immediately play the game again. With Charterstone we played 4 consecutive games. Had we more time we would have continued playing. As it is, we are getting together next Saturday to carry on. In comparison, someone mentioned Near and Far as being more interesting. I have Near and Fear. Kickstarted it in fact. I'm a huge Ryan Laukat fan and own most all his games. Same for Jamey btw. Anyway, I have campaign of Near and Far going, but it just doesn't generate that feeling of "gotta play it again right away." Not saying it's not good because it is very good. But Charterstone had that "I don't want to quit playing" feel to it.


I resemble that remark and while it would be easy to criticize what I don't enjoy about Charterstone. I think the game is fine on its own merits. It is not quite what I thought it was going to be. I also find myself enjoying the legacy aspects less with each play. I expected to enjoy that the most, devouring each game to reveal more of the final evolution. Now after just 3 plays I *almost* wish I could see the final game and make a final opinion.

To your other point. My wife and I played through Near and Far's campaign mode. We pushed ourselves to keep playing to see the end of the story, but were pretty burnt out at the end. Its just not a game (for us) that was fun to play over and over without having other games between. Charterstone definitely gives more of an itch of "maybe the next game will blow my mind". But perhaps drawing on the burnout experience we had with Near & Far, we may mix in a few other games before returning to game 4.
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Charles Waterman
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We're playing a 5 player game with a steady 4 and a rotating 5th player. I really think this game shines with 4 or more due to the competition for various spots on the board and the cards. (Hope that wasn't spoilerish.)

Are you playing 2 player? Try it with more!
 
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Tom Stearns
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BeefyThePug wrote:
gohrns wrote:

So often when I read a review, I get the feeling that the real criticism isn't that the game is bad, but that the game isn't what the reviewer wants it to be. That seems to be the case here.

Also one last thing. A sign of a good game for me is, do I want to immediately play the game again. With Charterstone we played 4 consecutive games. Had we more time we would have continued playing. As it is, we are getting together next Saturday to carry on. In comparison, someone mentioned Near and Far as being more interesting. I have Near and Fear. Kickstarted it in fact. I'm a huge Ryan Laukat fan and own most all his games. Same for Jamey btw. Anyway, I have campaign of Near and Far going, but it just doesn't generate that feeling of "gotta play it again right away." Not saying it's not good because it is very good. But Charterstone had that "I don't want to quit playing" feel to it.


I resemble that remark and while it would be easy to criticize what I don't enjoy about Charterstone. I think the game is fine on its own merits. It is not quite what I thought it was going to be. I also find myself enjoying the legacy aspects less with each play. I expected to enjoy that the most, devouring each game to reveal more of the final evolution. Now after just 3 plays I *almost* wish I could see the final game and make a final opinion.

To your other point. My wife and I played through Near and Far's campaign mode. We pushed ourselves to keep playing to see the end of the story, but were pretty burnt out at the end. Its just not a game (for us) that was fun to play over and over without having other games between. Charterstone definitely gives more of an itch of "maybe the next game will blow my mind". But perhaps drawing on the burnout experience we had with Near & Far, we may mix in a few other games before returning to game 4.


Or maybe it's about expectations. I didn't and still don't expect Charterstone to "blow my mind". In fact I probably have that kind of expectation with very few games....LOL...because I think that leads to disappointment. In fact I think I was a bit surprised that my group and I enjoyed Charterstone so much. You know, being old, grizzled war gamers that we are. The novel legacy aspect and the cutesy art work and all. Any raised expectations I may have had probably had to do with it being a Jamey Steigmaier design. Anyway I hope the game will improve for you. I think breaking between games and playing other things builds some anticipation to playing again.
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Lee Stoneman
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BeefyThePug wrote:
I resemble that remark


I'm confused by this sentence. What did you intend it to mean?
 
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Bruce H
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@gohrns - yes I need to learn to temper my expectations. As you pointed out, I think I got a little over hyped on the next thing from Jamey Steigmaier. I've played it again since this post and do enjoy it a bit more.

@LeeJS - poor grammar on my part, just meant I agreed/shared the opinion of the person I was quoting.
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