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Triangulated Review – On Mars – “I Would Like to Die On Mars. Just Not on Impact.”
(quote from Elon Musk)

Matt Damon grew potatoes from poop. This game could be glorious and awesome just like that! No really! “Godspeed little taters, my life depends on you!”

This will be the first time I am writing a review for a game that hasn’t been completed yet. I have spent just about every Wednesday in June playtesting with Lacerda and others on this very cool game design. My dedication has been to writing reviews for Kickstarters and up-and-coming Kickstarters. I want to give backers an idea of what they should back, and indie designers and little help. This game however is still at prototype and has quite a bit of time / refinement before it is done. But at the same time, there is a spark to this game even as a playtest model, so I had to review it. I think there is gold on Mars, and Lacerda has found it!

Mechanics:
(Disclaimer – the game is in playtesting, so while many of the mechanics have changed greatly, Lacerda did talk about the ones he really liked and were probably staying so I will focus on those. Admittedly, this is the section I am most nervous talking about)
1) Technology Track
At the moment, this is the place where you get those trademark extra actions on your turn, that turns what you do from a simple selection of an action, to a combination that makes your turn powerful. You didn’t simply learn how to make plants on Mars with something other than Matt Damon’s feces technique, you also moved your rover, and discovered a reservoir of water! This track has a clever hex design, and as you improve your technologies, you make room to learn new technologies. But you only have so much room to learn technologies and you have to level some before others, otherwise you will block up your R & D and not be able to move things forward when you need to. And as you learn new technologies, you are also getting bonuses to those techs. This tech track is also fulfilling a thematic goal of Lacerda’s that I will speak about later. But from a mechanics perspective it has all sorts of interesting decisions. This is player selected asymmetry (one of my favorite mechanics) – Do I want to be good at making power stations? Do I want my rover to be the best on Mars? Should my worker droids – (yes, I believe we have enslaved robots in this futuristic setting of the game) – be more like Commander Data and less like C3PO? And these decisions are not just driven by your own desires, but you are also looking around at other players boards trying to decide what they want and need. This track stands to reap great benefits for you, if you can entice your fellow players to use your track – as it will give you a free upgrade in your tech, or it will give you that very rare resource that is always very tight in Lacerda games – money! The technology track is a core component of the game that houses a lot of bonuses, end game scoring, actions, and player interaction.
2) Variable Turn Order
I hope this stays. One playtester was frustrated by it, but I think by-in-large this is one of the things that really gives this game some great decision making. There are two locations for you to be in this game, “In Orbit” or “On Planet”. If you are “In Orbit” you can develop technologies, spend money to trade goods back to earth, get blueprints for the buildings you are going to build – just a lot of planning for what you will do once you are planetside. Then as one of your actions, you can move your spaceship token over, land on Mars and start putting those plans to work – giving you an entire different selection of actions to choose and places to put your workers. So while you are on the orbit side, you can take one of your actions to fly to Mars (at a cost and risk of course – Mars isn’t a safe place!) Once there, it may become your turn again, and you can take actions once again. It is like the designer has taken two turn order tracks, put them side by side, and created separate turn order tracks for being “On Mars” and for “In Orbit,” and you can bounce between those tracks with one of your two actions on your turn. This turn-order mechanic, the way it is implemented right now, reminds me a lot of another Lacerda game that I enjoy, Kanban – except for some interesting improvements. You can really combo some great turns by moving over to Mars and squeezing out an extra action, and getting some greater resource benefits if you decide that working later in the turn order is ideal. Or you can forgo all those free things, if you just want to go higher in turn order to make sure your opponents don’t block or stop you from doing what you want to do.
3) Worker Placement / Action Selection
This is the part that was changing the most during playtest (well, 2nd most next to the Rover – but I am going to leave the Rover alone in this review – even though it was one of my favorite mechanics in one of our playtests). When you take your turn, depending on whether your are planetside or in orbit, at the beginning you have a handful of actions to choose from. Some are simple action selection, choose it and do it. Some have the option of giving you a bonus if you use a colonist. Some require a colonist to do (blocking the actions if they are filled with colonists). Your technology track is also a group of actions that you can select if you are planetside, and perhaps more importantly, your opponents technology tracks are also actions you can select, if you are willing to pay them a little. These technologies and player built action spaces, when upgraded, eventually become far stronger than the actions on the board.

Being the “Triangulated Review,” I try to only pick three things that stand out about a game, but the mechanics are definitely likely to change a little or a lot. There are some end game conditions, some earth goals, some building construction, the rover movement, and some area control that I didn’t go into. It is a wonderfully heavy game, and I am sure some of these will stay, but I chose to not write about them because I got the sense that they could more easily be changed and/or they didn’t make the part of the game that I enjoyed most.

Thematics:
(Disclaimer-less: This is the part of the game I feel more confident writing about. There are some really core ideas of what you are doing, that the designer is trying to communicate within the game’s mechanics)
1) Martian Independence
As you play this game, you become less-and-less dependent upon the orbit side of the player track. This is because as you are designing technologies and constructing buildings on Mars that allow you to mimic, and even do better than, what you can do on the orbit side of the game. Thematically, the colony is becoming more self-sufficient, and needs less help from Earth, eventually becoming a self-sustaining habitat – the game ending before you quite get to that point. Perhaps there will be a sequel – a Martian Revolutionary War where the robots rebel against their human oppressors! – but I get ahead of myself. The flow of the game really does communicate the theme of Martian Colonial Independence well. You start the game relying heavily on the Orbit side of the board, grabbing tech upgrades, blue prints, and exchanging on the market. Later in the game, you are really hoping you set yourself up well that you and other players are using your buildings and techs instead of going back to orbit to get help from earth.
2) Martian Tropes
Drones, droids, the search for ice crystals, food hexes that look like potato plants, spaceship deliveries of colonists, mining, a constant worry about the shortage of oxygen. I feel like Vital sat down for a few months, binged watched and read every sci-fi piece about Mars, and made sure to put those inspirations into this game. No matter what you are doing, you always feel like you are On Mars, and that constant stress of being short of what you need mechanically, fits that tightness of survival on a desolate planet. Everything you would expect from a homage to Mars sci-fi is there, except little green people.
3) Colonization
Playing this game, and being a former History teacher, I couldn’t help but feel a little déjà vu about teaching one of my lessons on royal charters / joint-stock companies that settled North America. In this game we have a handful of our own company goals that we are trying to fulfill, we also have goals sent to us from Earth (our Charter) that we are trying to fulfill, and we are being pulled in those directions for those tasty end-game objective points. Which, if History repeats itself, I can very well seeing occurring with an actual Mars colonization. Countries will pawn off the expense to companies to incur, but those companies will be incentivized and manipulated by their Earthly leaders. Next time I play, I may just have to call myself, “The Virginia Company.”

To Back or Not To Back, that is the question
:
This may be a little pre-mature, like slaughtering a jedi temple full of younglings before your new boss has delivered on his promise! (Sorry, Sci-Fi themes get me) But at the same time, what is the purpose of a review unless the reader can figure out if this is a game you want?
1. Classic Lacerda. If you are a fan of Lacerda games, then this one will be an automatic buy. It reminds me most of Kanban in how it plays because of the turn order and the tableau building, but to be honest, even in its unfinished state – and I am an owner of 2 Lacerda games – I am pretty this one will replace the Gallerist as my favorite.
2. Heavy Cardboard. If you are a fan of heavy games and you haven’t tried a Lacerda games (there are currently 4 of them you can try on Tabletopia) try them! This game definitely staves off alzheimers by keeping the brain churning! And if that is what you like, this game will do it. I love the complexity of heavy games, but my one criticism is there theme always seems to be about 19th century factories, winemaking, or something else rooted in non-fiction. On Mars gives me Science-Fiction and complexity! Do what I am doing, and budget now, so you can back it on Kickstarter at is highest level next year! (I have heard rumors that March-ish of next year this game will start making an appearance)
3. Mars Games. This seems to be a popular theme as of late. I think some buyers, if they do not know mechanically what they are getting into, may not like this game if it isn’t their style. This definitely is not “Terraforming Mars.” Do not be fooled by the hex spaces and the word “Mars” in the name. This game is 100% driven by player decisions and interactions. I admittedly have not played “Terraforming Mars,” but new players always bring Terraforming Mars up on the first play it seems, and their comments are always, “This is nothing like it!” So if you are looking for Terraforming Mars 2.0, this isn’t it.


I have some board game friends that are very “Amerithrash” in what they like, but I have caught them on more than one occasion also being very strategic and enjoying the heavier sides of those games. I am determined to convert them to my Euro-Gaming-Loving-Darkside, and this may be the right theme to do it with. I could never convince them to grow corn or design a garden – but I could probably convince them to drive a rover around Mars!

Thank you Vital Lacerda for allowing us to playtest your game. It has been enlightening to see how you work through the process of designing a game, but it has been equally fun playing a flawed unfinished prototype, which is a fact that just makes me even more excited for when it is done and 100% of what it should be. Because right now, wherever it is at (50% - 75%?), it is a blast to play. So when it is done, this thing will be tastier than Martian au-gratins! ... Is that pepper?


-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-

If you are interested in other Triangulated Reviews.

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Enrico Helbig
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Oh my Lord. After this preview I want this game so much more. What is it now, I am hoping that the explained Mechanics are not to be changed. Somewhere I read that Vital is trying to make his heaviest game ever with this and thats what I am hoping so much. ( for insiders heavy -ev +1616 =happy ==> Vital)
Happily looking forward for Kickstarter.
Vital you are a great Game designer.
Thanks for the preview.
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Vital Lacerda
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2010 - Vinhos, 2012 - CO2, 2014 - kanban, 2015 - The Gallerist, 2016 - Vinhos Deluxe, 2017 - Lisboa, 2018 - Escape Plan, CO2 Second Chance and Dragon Keepers - Maybe: 2019 - ROTW Portugal and On Mars, 2020 - Kanban Deluxe Edition, Mercato
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Hey Paul,
Thank you for the amazing and so well written review. It is wonderful to playtesting with you. I hope you may want to join in another session some day to see how the game evolved.
You are right, the mecahnics you so well described here are the core ones, so I’m sure besides some adjustments, they will have a big part on the final version.
I’m happy that you got the theme in the same away I’m trying to offer to players, but even more for all your ideas, comments and sugestions. That is the most important part of any playtesting.
I’m very pleased with the developing direction and I hope players also enjoyed it after released.
Once more, thank you for the Triangulated Review.

P.S
I will ask Ian to keep the potatoes plant.
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Jake Blomquist
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Solid review. I've only gotten the chance to do two playtests, so I don't quite speak with the authority you do. But yeah, it's definitely shaping up to be, as you say, "classic Lacerda" and all of the changes I'm seeing come out of the playtesting seem to be moving the game in the right direction.

TaylonMoon wrote:
I love the complexity of heavy games, but my one criticism is there theme always seems to be about 19th century factories, winemaking, or something else rooted in non-fiction. On Mars gives me Science-Fiction and complexity!


I have to slightly disagree with you here. Personally I can hardly think of a theme that gets me more excited than "19th century factories" and so I'm a little sad to see your dismissal of them. And actually I think a distinction should be made about On Mars' theme. I don't know if I'd call it "sci-fi" personally, as (at least in the board game context) that usually has connotations of fictional alien races and all sorts of crazy or weird stuff. But I really like the On Mars theme because it's more grounded. While it's not something we're currently doing, it seems like a reasonable look at a very possible near future. For a long time I really just didn't love any space games, and I think the theme was at least a part of that, but I really like Kepler-3042 and really get into its theme, and I think On Mars is in a similar space to that, in terms of feeling as "non-fiction"-y as a space game can.

GermanCosmo wrote:
Somewhere I read that Vital is trying to make his heaviest game ever with this and thats what I am hoping so much.


Hmm, I'd be curious to see if this were true. At least as of now from my perspective it's on the lighter side of his games. Certainly it'll be heavier than Escape Plan, and I can't speak to the introductory version of Vinhos because I haven't tried that. And even CO2 is hard to compare for me because it asks for such a different approach than his others. But based on my playtests my feeling is that it's definitely lighter than The Gallerist, which in turn I find lighter than Lisboa, Kanban, and original Vinhos.

Now, of course a lot is still changing and seemingly a lot of the changes are making the game heavier, but I wonder if there's enough to change that it will end up the heaviest.
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Paul Gipson
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Hi Jake,

I do remember you beating us quite handily in one of our playtest games!

Quote:
I have to slightly disagree with you here. Personally I can hardly think of a theme that gets me more excited than "19th century factories" and so I'm a little sad to see your dismissal of them


I was not trying to be dismissive. I was a History teacher, and the progressive era was my favorite to teach (my fellow teachers thought I was crazy for it) I have actually been trying very hard to convince my friends to play Arkwright with me, but it is just a hard sell to get to the table because of the theme (but hey, if you want to play it, message me and we will make 19th Century Industrialism happen!). So themes, like Sci-Fi ones, that excite a larger group of people, and have challenging mechanics are a sweet spot for me because I can still enjoy the game and I can find players to play.

Quote:
And actually I think a distinction should be made about On Mars' theme. I don't know if I'd call it "sci-fi" personally, as (at least in the board game context) that usually has connotations of fictional alien races and all sorts of crazy or weird stuff. But I really like the On Mars theme because it's more grounded. While it's not something we're currently doing, it seems like a reasonable look at a very possible near future.


You are spot on here! And I think that approach to the theme definitely bridges the gap nicely between both types of people. The ones that want the fiction and those that want the realism. This is why I referenced the book / movie, The Martian a few times. So while it still sets in the "Sci-Fi" genre, it is probably more Sci than Fi. Sounds like I am just using a broad brush for for the definition Sci-Fi, while you are using a more narrow one. There is definitely no little green men in this game, just good old fashion potato eating, mining, and finding ways to breathe! And it is probably better for that reason.

I did enjoy playing with you, and I hope we find time for another game in the future!

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I asked him on Twitter. Have a look I can find it. He told he is trying to do his best to get a 5 on Bgg ranking.
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GermanCosmo wrote:
I asked him on Twitter. Have a look I can find it. He told he is trying to do his best to get a 5 on Bgg ranking.


?

I am not sure what you mean by this?
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TaylonMoon wrote:
GermanCosmo wrote:
I asked him on Twitter. Have a look I can find it. He told he is trying to do his best to get a 5 on Bgg ranking.


?

I am not sure what you mean by this?


In weight. I guess.
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Dan Sheahan
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Thanks so much for the sharing your thoughts on On Mars. I was irrationally excited about this game when I came across it a couple of months back, based on nothing more than a single picture and the designer. It's really nice to have something more substantial to base that excitement on 😊
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Enrico Helbig
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You are right.
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TaylonMoon wrote:
I have some board game friends that are very “Amerithrash” in what they like, but I have caught them on more than one occasion also being very strategic and enjoying the heavier sides of those games. I am determined to convert them to my Euro-Gaming-Loving-Darkside, and this may be the right theme to do it with. I could never convince them to grow corn or design a garden – but I could probably convince them to drive a rover around Mars!


Aside from the great review, this is the bit that carries the most resonance for me. Except that I would say ALL of my board game friends are Ameritrash people, which is why I am very much favouring games that do solo. Will On Mars support single player?
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Great review. I’m really pleased you only focused on the core elements likely to stay in the game, and not every detail. That’s one way to setup fans for disappointment. Kudos.

It’s also interesting getting a glimpse into Mr.Lacerda’s design process and how these incredible games come about.

Hope you get more play tests in and can share impressions. thumbsup cool


Quote:
Will On Mars support single player?


Given all Mr.Lacerda’s other games have had solo... and Escape Plan’s first Kickstarter goal was solo mode (passed first day)... looks like go for solo launch. laugh
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How does negotiation work in the game? Is it free-wheeling no-limits negotiation, forced and tightly regulated, or somewhere in between? I'm both intrigued and apprehensive about a Lacerda game with negotiation in it as negotiation is one of my wife's least favorite player interaction mechanisms.
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MentatYP wrote:
How does negotiation work in the game? Is it free-wheeling no-limits negotiation, forced and tightly regulated, or somewhere in between? I'm both intrigued and apprehensive about a Lacerda game with negotiation in it as negotiation is one of my wife's least favorite player interaction mechanisms.


I don't remember there being any, at least as of the last time I played. I wonder where this is coming from, I'm starting to think I missed some update somewhere.
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jblomquist wrote:
MentatYP wrote:
How does negotiation work in the game? Is it free-wheeling no-limits negotiation, forced and tightly regulated, or somewhere in between? I'm both intrigued and apprehensive about a Lacerda game with negotiation in it as negotiation is one of my wife's least favorite player interaction mechanisms.


I don't remember there being any, at least as of the last time I played. I wonder where this is coming from, I'm starting to think I missed some update somewhere.


It's in the game page description:

Quote:
Players negotiate with each other over a limited set of actions they can take in their turn and the raw materials sent from Earth.
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MentatYP wrote:
jblomquist wrote:
MentatYP wrote:
How does negotiation work in the game? Is it free-wheeling no-limits negotiation, forced and tightly regulated, or somewhere in between? I'm both intrigued and apprehensive about a Lacerda game with negotiation in it as negotiation is one of my wife's least favorite player interaction mechanisms.


I don't remember there being any, at least as of the last time I played. I wonder where this is coming from, I'm starting to think I missed some update somewhere.


It's in the game page description:

Quote:
Players negotiate with each other over a limited set of actions they can take in their turn and the raw materials sent from Earth.



My guess is that this description from the designer is referring to how the technology tracks and player interaction work ....

Quote:
Technology ... And these decisions are not just driven by your own desires, but you are also looking around at other players boards trying to decide what they want and need. This track stands to reap great benefits for you, if you can entice your fellow players to use your track – as it will give you a free upgrade in your tech, or it will give you that very rare resource that is always very tight in Lacerda games – money! The technology track is a core component of the game that houses a lot of bonuses, end game scoring, actions, and player interaction.
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TaylonMoon wrote:
MentatYP wrote:
jblomquist wrote:
MentatYP wrote:
How does negotiation work in the game? Is it free-wheeling no-limits negotiation, forced and tightly regulated, or somewhere in between? I'm both intrigued and apprehensive about a Lacerda game with negotiation in it as negotiation is one of my wife's least favorite player interaction mechanisms.


I don't remember there being any, at least as of the last time I played. I wonder where this is coming from, I'm starting to think I missed some update somewhere.


It's in the game page description:

Quote:
Players negotiate with each other over a limited set of actions they can take in their turn and the raw materials sent from Earth.



My guess is that this description from the designer is referring to how the technology tracks and player interaction work ....

Quote:
Technology ... And these decisions are not just driven by your own desires, but you are also looking around at other players boards trying to decide what they want and need. This track stands to reap great benefits for you, if you can entice your fellow players to use your track – as it will give you a free upgrade in your tech, or it will give you that very rare resource that is always very tight in Lacerda games – money! The technology track is a core component of the game that houses a lot of bonuses, end game scoring, actions, and player interaction.


...Knowing nothing about the mechanics nor play testing the game, I wonder if "competition" would be a better word to use than "negotiation"...
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Quote:

...Knowing nothing about the mechanics nor play testing the game, I wonder if "competition" would be a better word to use than "negotiation"...



It works something like this, verbally in the game.


1) I have a tech that allows you to use the marketplace from Mars,
2) but my opponent Rick also has that tech
3) The third player at the table is getting ready to fly back to space, and you say, "Hey Joey! No need to do that! Just use my tech right here, and you can save yourself a turn!" Then my opponent chimes in, "No, don't do that, Paul is already winning - look at all the money he has - use my marketplace tech instead!"
4) So does Joey go with me, or does Joey go with Rick -- and we both try to convince him that we are the better deal (because whoever he chooses, gets a kickback)... its a fun, verbal interaction in a Lacerda game, that I haven't experienced before - because players get to make choices about using other player's resources. I guess it is something, somewhat similar or close to it, would be the boats in Lisboa.
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Oh, that is really cool. Thanks. So it is a type of negotiation...this should be interesting.
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If negotiation is an integral part of the game, I'm going to pass on this game. I dislike this game mechanism.
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Thanks. Sounds like a snoozer to me; I'll pass.
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Vital Lacerda
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2010 - Vinhos, 2012 - CO2, 2014 - kanban, 2015 - The Gallerist, 2016 - Vinhos Deluxe, 2017 - Lisboa, 2018 - Escape Plan, CO2 Second Chance and Dragon Keepers - Maybe: 2019 - ROTW Portugal and On Mars, 2020 - Kanban Deluxe Edition, Mercato
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There is no negotiation in On Mars.
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newrev wrote:
There is no negotiation in On Mars.

Thank you for confirming this! The game summary has been updated to remove the mention of negotiation as well.
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The only negotiation will be “...Honey, I need $$$ for another Lacerda Kickstarter...”
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newrev wrote:
There is no negotiation in On Mars.

And here we go. Waiting to hunt down my new prey...
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