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Kemet: Seth» Forums » General

Subject: Set(h) rss

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Jon Snow
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Since its Set in English, I'm just wondering; is it "Seth" in French? I've had a number of discussions with various non-American/British Commonwealth game designers about translations like this. It seems to me that if you are producing an "English" edition, you should speak my language in it, n'est pas? Otherwise you sacrifice much recognition among US/British customers at the outset.

Either way, I'm sure it will be great and I'll buy it at the first opportunity!
 
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Reddish22
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I see many English texts spelling it either Set or Seth.

So I’d say you’re starting from a false premise that it’s exclusively Set in English.
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Brent Gerig
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I'm pretty sure it has nothing to do with French/English, and everything to do with transliterations of transliterations. Wikipedia lists valid alternatives as Set, Seth, Setesh, Sutekh, Setekh, and Suty. As far as I can tell, "Seth" comes to us as a transliteration of the Greek Σήθ, which is their transliteration of his Egyptian name, but the pronunciation of "Set" comes to us via the Coptic transliteration of his name.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Set_(deity)
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Brent Gerig
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Adding to that, my friend who's studied Greek and Hebrew (has some similarities to Coptic) says that originally it would have been "Set" with an aspirated "t." That means that it'd be pronounced hard, but forcefully with an exhalation of air. She says:
rachel3liza wrote:
here's an example: bam vs pam. If you say both with you hand in front of your mouth, you'll feel that you pronounce both the same, except with 'pam' there's a burst of air. That's aspiration.

She goes on to say
rachel3liza wrote:
So, from what I'm finding, Coptic has a t sound that is aspirated and can go at the end of words. τ is non-aspirated, so it looks like they decided to go with θ for an aspirated t even though in Greek it's normally a th sound. So 'Seth' as the name of the Egyptian God should be pronounced 'Set(h)' where 't(h)' is an aspirated t.


So, there you have it!
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King Maple
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I think that the point is that if most know it as Set, calling it Seth is indeed weird. But this was pointed out to them in the past and it wasn't changed.

It is indeed Seth in French.
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Jon Snow
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"Crocodilopolis!"
--Johnny the Archaeologist, Doc Savage Crew


I figured. Matagot is great on games, but doesn't provide any 'backstory' culture in Cyclades or Kemet. I went through hell just getting the names of the gods/goddesses from Kemet so I could role play them a bit while gaming. Yet in Inis, its all put in there for you. Go figure...

I prevented a number of bad translations in Mare Nostrum. But while Uve of Academy Games was almost convinced to call the Lost Continent Atlantis, (as they had in the first edition) he flipped back to call it Atlas, which means nothing to us at all. (Atlas is the king and leader of that nation in the game). Sacre Bleu!
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