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Subject: Coaching rss

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Geoffrey Burrell
United States
Cedar Rapids
Iowa
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Does everyone else out there allow or disallow coaching when it comes to younger players even though the helper isn't playing the game? Would anyone else out there consider it meddling? Should the young kids learn by trial and error? Thoughts?
 
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Nathanael Robinson
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If the child is still making the choices, I don't care. It takes time for kids to assimilate rules, be they grammar or games, and they should benefit from the help of an adult who can explain what they can do and hint as the possible consequences of certain actions.
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'Bernard Wingrave'
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One of the great things about the cardboard versions of boardgames is that players can be given help in whatever way the group thinks is appropriate. So I think whatever is the most fun is the best choice.

I think giving help is especially good if one of the players is younger or unfamiliar with the game, or both.

If a player is getting a whole lot of help, it might be good to think about the next game being a simpler one. And of course if you are getting help, you don't get full bragging rights if you win -- winning really isn't the point if you are just learning the game.
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American in Chile
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Even when mine were very young, I never coached or allowed coaching. That is, no one gave advice or suggestions. However, pointing out all the available options (and their possible effects) is a good thing for a younger or novice player, as long as there are no hints of what people think is the best thing to do. They learn very quickly if they make their own decisions.

It doesn't really matter in the end whether the child's choices are good or bad. We rejoiced over good things and laughed at bad things, whether they happened to ourselves or others. And if someone, adult or child, managed to overcome the results of bad luck or bad decisions, that was cause for more rejoicing. We tried to teach them that the fun was in the playing, not in winning.
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Andi G
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Schoolmarm5 wrote:
Even when mine were very young, I never coached or allowed coaching. That is, no one gave advice or suggestions. However, pointing out all the available options (and their possible effects) is a good thing for a younger or novice player, as long as there are no hints of what people think is the best thing to do. They learn very quickly if they make their own decisions.

It doesn't really matter in the end whether the child's choices are good or bad. We rejoiced over good things and laughed at bad things, whether they happened to ourselves or others. And if someone, adult or child, managed to overcome the results of bad luck or bad decisions, that was cause for more rejoicing. We tried to teach them that the fun was in the playing, not in winning.



Huh...originally when the question was posed about "coaching" I was thinking - go for it, I have no problem with helping a child learn a game. Heck I've done it with adults (when asked). But I didn't see this side of it - where coaching becomes leading them to the best choice.

So, here's my thoughts on coaching - If you are presenting a child with All the options that are available so they can learn spot them all on their own eventually AND allowing the child to make whatever choice they choose (even if it's the worst possible choice) - Go for it. You're helping them learn the game. Sometimes I'll ask for someone to help me with that if I'm struggling to learn a new game.

If you are simply telling the child to "do this because it's the best choice" then you're not coaching, you're playing for them. I'm against that, let them experience and learn the game on their own.

I'm assuming too that OP is referring to a non-player coach (as opposed to having another player trying to help the child). Again, with the above caveats I don't have a problem with that.
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lampeter
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I am pro-coaching when it comes to helping a child to explore the rules of a game, and even its scope. By scope, I mean, for example, that my kids have participated in some group chess lessons that helped them to understand the basics and begin to love the game. They started with simplified games and worked up from there. In play at home, I will remind kids of special abilities or infrequently invoked rules, but of course it is up to them to use them or not.

I try to be sensitive to how much help a kid wants and actually needs. Sometimes a kid really wants to figure it out on their own; I try not to get in the way of that. Sometimes a kid needs some leading questions, like "What will happen next turn if you do that?" Sometimes a much younger kid needs a little extra scaffolding to play a game they really aren't quite ready for. There's nothing wrong with training wheels, if used appropriately (and I say that as someone whose kids used balance bikes-- there just isn't one best way to learn stuff).
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Sarah
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I think it's fine to coach or give tips - especially if playing against older kids or adults - it would just help them get it faster. Same as I would with anything else like reading - I'm not just going to hand her a book at age 4 and say "hey, teach yourself to read" laugh

However, mine has always stropped if I try to help in most aspects including reading as apparently wants to figure it out for herself or believes she knows best already so I can only sneak coach by pointing out what i'm doing and why and only rarely get away with a carefully hidden hint on her turn!!

Same with reading, I just had to leave things around which helped her learn without her noticing or not coming directly from me. She most certainly regards it as meddling otherwise and god forsake me if I try and help with her homework!

So I imagine it's more down to the kid although I suppose you shouldn't really help one if there are a few kids with not so much of an age gap between them though perhaps?

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Cassandra Thompson
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Cthulhumom wrote:
Schoolmarm5 wrote:
Even when mine were very young, I never coached or allowed coaching. That is, no one gave advice or suggestions. However, pointing out all the available options (and their possible effects) is a good thing for a younger or novice player, as long as there are no hints of what people think is the best thing to do. They learn very quickly if they make their own decisions.

It doesn't really matter in the end whether the child's choices are good or bad. We rejoiced over good things and laughed at bad things, whether they happened to ourselves or others. And if someone, adult or child, managed to overcome the results of bad luck or bad decisions, that was cause for more rejoicing. We tried to teach them that the fun was in the playing, not in winning.



Huh...originally when the question was posed about "coaching" I was thinking - go for it, I have no problem with helping a child learn a game. Heck I've done it with adults (when asked). But I didn't see this side of it - where coaching becomes leading them to the best choice.

So, here's my thoughts on coaching - If you are presenting a child with All the options that are available so they can learn spot them all on their own eventually AND allowing the child to make whatever choice they choose (even if it's the worst possible choice) - Go for it. You're helping them learn the game. Sometimes I'll ask for someone to help me with that if I'm struggling to learn a new game.

If you are simply telling the child to "do this because it's the best choice" then you're not coaching, you're playing for them. I'm against that, let them experience and learn the game on their own.

I'm assuming too that OP is referring to a non-player coach (as opposed to having another player trying to help the child). Again, with the above caveats I don't have a problem with that.


+1 this.

If by coaching you mean explaining all the options (or as many options as they can take in at once) and then letting them make a choice... yes, happily 'coach'.

Also, happily give advice *if* asked (they occasionally do want to know what is a good move or how to choose between moves) in the form of an explanation of some of the outcomes of the various choices (e.g. If you do A, then the next player might do B, or C...).Older kids will often take over the explaining - great way for them to improve their understanding).

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