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Subject: Guides: Amazons, Breakthrough, Lines of Action, Slither, Symple rss

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David Ploog
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I've been writing a bit about a few board games I like a lot. The ultimate goal may be a book but let's see how far I get. The list of games is in the title. Some of these had no previous coverage at all (Slither, Symple), as far as I know.

Amazons (10 pages, 11 problems) -- BGG forum -- LG forum.
Breakthrough (7 pages, 12 problems) -- LG forum.
Lines of Action (10 pages, 8 problems) -- BGG forum -- LG forum
Slither (7 pages, 9 problems) -- BGG forum -- LG forum
Symple (4 pages, 3 problems).

The above links are stable and will provide the most recent version I've uploaded. Feedback can go to any of the above places, or in any other form. Anyone wanting to participate more strongly is extremely welcome! (Typesetting uses Latex + tikz, and git for revision control, but knowledge of neither is needed to take part.)

Thanks for reading!

Updates:
2019/03/12: added Amazons, Slither
2019/03/19: improved Amazons
2019/04/07: improved Amazons, Slither; added Symple
2019/05/26: improved Amazons, Symple; added Lines of Action
2019/06/20: added Breakthrough
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Daniel Piovezan
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
dpeggie wrote:
I've been toying with the idea of writing a bit about a few board games I like a lot. The hope would be to advertise them, although it is highly unclear how I'd really achieve that.
Yeah, that's a tough one. Posting either at the games' forums or here is a bit like preaching to the choir. But even if you do reach larger audiences... I remember this review of Dameo, which got featured in BGG's mailing list (probably helped by that gorgeus picture) and it still got a meager 17 thumbs.

dpeggie wrote:
So far, I have two pieces to show, and I've posted them in their respective BGG forums. However, not too much is going on there (many thanks to Luis for being the unique witness to my Slither thread!),
Now don't be silly, at least two other people thumbed your thread, not to mention others who may have seen it. I had seen it and I didn't care much for it. Not that it's bad, but Slither is already in my want-to-play list, and I don't want to read much about problems and tactics until I actually get around to playing it. On the other hand, experienced players might dismiss those files as too introductory. I believe, however, that someone who is curious about Slither, but still on the fence about whether or not to give it a try, could be convinced by your articles (same for Amazons, probably).

dpeggie wrote:
so I mention them here -- hopefully that goes well with local custom, and is not frowned upon.
Yes, we do that here. It's probably a very un-BGG thing to do, but these abstract folks, they're rebels!
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christian freeling
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
BozoDel wrote:
I remember this review of Dameo, which got featured in BGG's mailing list (probably helped by that gorgeus picture) and it still got a meager 17 thumbs.
Eighteen now, I hadn't seen the article. Sometimes I stumble around in BGG like a kid lost in Tokyo.
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Russ Williams
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
christianF wrote:
I hadn't seen the article. Sometimes I stumble around in BGG like a kid lost in Tokyo.
I recommend subscribing to your own games, so you'll be notified when new posts are made in their forums!
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
russ wrote:
christianF wrote:
I hadn't seen the article. Sometimes I stumble around in BGG like a kid lost in Tokyo.
I recommend subscribing to your own games, so you'll be notified when new posts are made in their forums!
I actually did that a couple of days ago, at least for five of them. It fits in with the plan to slowly update the lot and make some of it it a bit more presentable. A man's gotta do what a man's gotta do!
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
Hi David, this is a fantastic idea.

I really hope you keep this going because I would love to see more games explained using this format.

I did something similar with Breakthrough some time ago: Basic Introduction to Breakthrough. Please feel free to use all the material included in that document if you ever plan to write about Breakthrough. You don't even need to cite me as the source.

PS: If you ever run out of "great-games-that-deserve-to-be-better-known" just ask. Be have plenty of them here...
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Deep Fish
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
Thanks I downloaded both pdfs. Very useful. The rationale for these seem like well thought out statements of intent especially.
 
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Daniel Piovezan
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
christianF wrote:
russ wrote:
I recommend subscribing to your own games, so you'll be notified when new posts are made in their forums!
I actually did that a couple of days ago, at least for five of them. It fits in with the plan to slowly update the lot and make some of it it a bit more presentable. A man's gotta do what a man's gotta do!
I *think* that if you subscribe to your own designer page, it automagically covers all your games. Not sure.
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Pablo Schulman
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
Neat idea, I've tried to make one myself for Pylos (a favorite of mine) and those are hard to come up with.

If you don't mind, I'll see if I can improve them in terms of topics arrangement. I'm really struggling to read them as is. For example, in the Amazons one, you start discussing faulty territories, while I'd discuss. Then you jump to strategic considerations, then opening. It's all over the place to me.
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Denies Gaskins
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
These are very well-written articles. I can't wait to read what's next!
 
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David Ploog
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
PSchulman wrote:
If you don't mind, I'll see if I can improve them in terms of topics arrangement. I'm really struggling to read them as is. For example, in the Amazons one, you start discussing faulty territories, while I'd discuss. Then you jump to strategic considerations, then opening. It's all over the place to me.
I would be extremely grateful if you can help me improve the structure! Please do

These texts are nowhere near finalised. I just thought they might be good enough to show to people. So many ways to improve them, and structure / narrative is definitely one of them. I did have a reason for treating the endgame before the opening: as in many games, the endgame is easier to understand and to explain that the midgame or the opening. But even if that is a valid reason, it should probably be mentioned in the text.
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
dpeggie wrote:
Typesetting uses Latex + tikz, and git for revision control

I am quite impressed.

Oh yeah, and the strategy tips are impressive too
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Steven Meyers
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
dpeggie wrote:
I've been toying with the idea of writing a bit about a few board games I like a lot. The hope would be to advertise them, although it is highly unclear how I'd really achieve that.

So far, I have two pieces to show, and I've posted them in their respective BGG forums. However, not too much is going on there (many thanks to Luis for being the unique witness to my Slither thread!), so I mention them here -- hopefully that goes well with local custom, and is not frowned upon.

I am linking the pdf files, the BGG forum threads and the LG forum threads.
Amazons (6 pages) -- BGG forum -- LG forum.
Slither (6 pages) -- BGG forum -- LG forum

The above links are stable and will provide the most recent version I've uploaded. Feedback can go to any of the above places, or in any other form. I plan to cover some more games, as long as I've got sufficient time and energy. Anyone wanting to participate more strongly is extremely welcome! (Typesetting uses Latex + tikz, and git for revision control, but knowledge of neither is needed to take part.)

Thanks for reading!

Nice articles! You went pretty deeply into tactics and strategy given their short length, and I think they'll be helpful in generating interest about these games.

FYI the Slither article only mentioned the inventor's first name, and at the very end. You should probably also include the year the game was invented.

Steve

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David Ploog
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
swshogimeyers wrote:
You went pretty deeply into tactics and strategy given their short length, and I think they'll be helpful in generating interest about these games.
Many thanks, I certainly appreciate this assessment!

There's a reason for my brevity: perhaps, ideally, this might become a book project. I intentionally go for quality over quantity, so this won't be a long list of games with rules and a few words about history and one example game. Every game I cover should be excellent, and I insist on providing some non-trivial content on game-play, for three reasons: (1) advertise the game to people who don't know it yet, (2) make those particular games stand out a little more in a sea of abstract board games, (3) to prove (well, indicate) that the game has enough depth to be worth spending time with. [It is entirely unclear whether I can live up these expectations. In particular, problems/puzzles are extremely important, but also very hard to make.]

Now, I only want to cover a few games but I can't waste space (e.g. 20 games of 10 pages each is already a full book). So I need to carefully choose what I do say, what I omit, what I defer to problems, and be brief throughout.

Quote:
FYI the Slither article only mentioned the inventor's first name, and at the very end. You should probably also include the year the game was invented.
These should absolutely be mentioned, but thankfully, they are I just had a look, to be sure. For both games, there's a footnote on the first page giving author and year. This is not the final layout (nothing in these articles is). I just put this information ... somewhere. If this becomes bigger, there'll be a page of game authors and their games (in the book).
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Pablo Schulman
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
dpeggie wrote:
There's a reason for my brevity: perhaps, ideally, this might become a book project. I intentionally go for quality over quantity, so this won't be a long list of games with rules and a few words about history and one example game. Every game I cover should be excellent, and I insist on providing some non-trivial content on game-play, for three reasons: (1) advertise the game to people who don't know it yet, (2) make those particular games stand out a little more in a sea of abstract board games, (3) to prove (well, indicate) that the game has enough depth to be worth spending time with. [It is entirely unclear whether I can live up these expectations. In particular, problems/puzzles are extremely important, but also very hard to make.]

Now, I only want to cover a few games but I can't waste space (e.g. 20 games of 10 pages each is already a full book). So I need to carefully choose what I do say, what I omit, what I defer to problems, and be brief throughout.

David, I just shot you an e-mail regarding this.
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
PSchulman wrote:
dpeggie wrote:
There's a reason for my brevity: perhaps, ideally, this might become a book project. I intentionally go for quality over quantity, so this won't be a long list of games with rules and a few words about history and one example game. Every game I cover should be excellent, and I insist on providing some non-trivial content on game-play, for three reasons: (1) advertise the game to people who don't know it yet, (2) make those particular games stand out a little more in a sea of abstract board games, (3) to prove (well, indicate) that the game has enough depth to be worth spending time with. [It is entirely unclear whether I can live up these expectations. In particular, problems/puzzles are extremely important, but also very hard to make.]

Now, I only want to cover a few games but I can't waste space (e.g. 20 games of 10 pages each is already a full book). So I need to carefully choose what I do say, what I omit, what I defer to problems, and be brief throughout.

David, I just shot you an e-mail regarding this.
I'm super-interested in such a project. I feel like I've been waiting for someone to do it. If you do this, I would love to assist.
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Nick Bentley
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
milomilo122 wrote:
PSchulman wrote:
dpeggie wrote:
There's a reason for my brevity: perhaps, ideally, this might become a book project. I intentionally go for quality over quantity, so this won't be a long list of games with rules and a few words about history and one example game. Every game I cover should be excellent, and I insist on providing some non-trivial content on game-play, for three reasons: (1) advertise the game to people who don't know it yet, (2) make those particular games stand out a little more in a sea of abstract board games, (3) to prove (well, indicate) that the game has enough depth to be worth spending time with. [It is entirely unclear whether I can live up these expectations. In particular, problems/puzzles are extremely important, but also very hard to make.]

Now, I only want to cover a few games but I can't waste space (e.g. 20 games of 10 pages each is already a full book). So I need to carefully choose what I do say, what I omit, what I defer to problems, and be brief throughout.

David, I just shot you an e-mail regarding this.
I'm super-interested in such a project. I feel like I've been waiting for someone to do it. If you do this, I would love to assist.
Thinking about this more: make it a wikibook to start, and invite contributions from this community. The scope and difficulty of this project makes me think it needs to be a group effort. I'd be happy to write stuff about any of the few games at which I'm skilled.
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David Ploog
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
Pablo & Nick: many thanks for the encouragement and the support!

I have dreamt of, but not quite dared to hope, that my little effort might make a little splash in this niche. It'd be so cool if more people felt compelled to write something about their favourite game. I'm in no way special here: people have been doing precisely that for probably more than hundred years and it tickles my heart to know I stand in this tradition.

However, I believe that it's a good time to try and have a grander look at the landscape because there are so very many abstracts designed right now. (There was a board game craze in the 19th century, but current numbers are much higher.) When I first got into the hobby, as a kid, we had some books, and I'd read diligently about every game that was black & white, with counters. It is much easier now to print books (I hope I can benefit from that trend myself), and perhaps also easier to publish games. (Not sure on that one, but Nestor Games indicate it might be true. For box games, the situation is so good, one might be worried it's bad already, with the Great Board Game Bubble about to burst anytime -- recall the video game crash of 1985!)

Okay, here's the grizzly truth: no two of us will be able to agree on the list of canonical abstract games. I'll give a few examples:

Focus, a 1965 Sid Sackson design, is at the very least an interesting stacking game. Here's what Sid said on it: Focus is, in the completely unbiased view of the author, a lot more fun to play than any board game of skill that has preceded it. Was he serious? Does he really say that Focus is better than Go? What about Christian's take on the concept with Crossfire? Now, I played some Focus, and I liked it. Can I guarantee it's The Masterpiece of Stacking Games (tm)? No, of course not. I'll try to get it into my book, but on a shaky foundation: I trust Sid Sackson.

Hex, the 1942 Piet Hein classic -- one of the most well-known board games after the ancient ones, I'd say. But I just don't get it. I played Hex, and I hated every moment of it: I had no idea what I should do on the board, and why anyone would want to play it. I am happy to have it in my book (obviously, I couldn't or shouldn't write that entry, but I found support already) but again, because I accept its stature.

Othello, an 1883 almost-folk game (the double-sided pieces prevent it from becoming 100% folk-ey, I guess). This is another game I don't get and never want to play again. And in sharp contrast with Hex, I won't put Othello in the book, no matter what anyone says (or if someone gives me a well-written text on it). I don't argue that Othello is too flat -- it certainly has depth. In an entirely subjective fashion, I say "Hex ok, Othello no". It is unreasonable to expect that anyone will follow all my arbitrary decisions. And then there is...

Pente/Renju/..., a flood of line games. These are fun to play, I enjoyed a bunch of them. They're definitely not trivial, if done right, and some are outright nifty. And I don't want any line games in my book. I believe that pattern games are mostly tactical, because they tend to be so local and combinatorial. Who's going to follow me on that? And pattern games are currently very popular. I'm not too happy about the many chain scoring games cropping up everywhere, either.

So here I stand, preaching the gospel of "these are the 24 or so best abstract games", and I can't be right. This is why I don't think that an open collaboration is good for me (or for the collaborators). Have a look at the following lists
Games of Soldiers, Games of Kings and Soldiers, Games of Towers,
painstakingly compiled by Joao Neto and containing the rules for 277+163+92 = 432 abstracts. And it stops some years ago (can't blame Joao on this, the work maintaining a data base like this is huge), so it is missing many recent designs.

In wiki-mode, we'd (hopefully!) end up with strategy articles for many, perhaps even most of these games. I don't want that! My goals are different, and I realise as I type how elitist this is: I want to promote a few, select (by me) games that I think should stand the test of time.

TL;DR: (a) I'm happy to make all my articles openly accessible, so that anyone can use them, including on a wiki. (b) I am very happy to have people chime in, on any level, from proofreading to providing full entries for games [*]. (c) I couldn't organise wiki-style cooperation although I think it's a good idea.

[*] I am not as dead set on games as the above makes it sound. For example, if someone feels strongly about AYU or ARCHIMEDES or CANNON, I could be convinced to include them even if I'm currently not prepared to write something on them myself.

So despite the atrocious length of this posting, my message is: less is more. If one takes this seriously, it forces uncomfortable decisions making collective work unlikely/impossible. That said, I am happy about support and in all sincerity, I invite collaboration!
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Steven Meyers
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
dpeggie wrote:
Pablo & Nick: many thanks for the encouragement and the support!

I have dreamt of, but not quite dared to hope, that my little effort might make a little splash in this niche. It'd be so cool if more people felt compelled to write something about their favourite game. I'm in no way special here: people have been doing precisely that for probably more than hundred years and it tickles my heart to know I stand in this tradition.

However, I believe that it's a good time to try and have a grander look at the landscape because there are so very many abstracts designed right now. (There was a board game craze in the 19th century, but current numbers are much higher.) When I first got into the hobby, as a kid, we had some books, and I'd read diligently about every game that was black & white, with counters. It is much easier now to print books (I hope I can benefit from that trend myself), and perhaps also easier to publish games. (Not sure on that one, but Nestor Games indicate it might be true. For box games, the situation is so good, one might be worried it's bad already, with the Great Board Game Bubble about to burst anytime -- recall the video game crash of 1985!)

Okay, here's the grizzly truth: no two of us will be able to agree on the list of canonical abstract games. I'll give a few examples:

Focus, a 1965 Sid Sackson design, is at the very least an interesting stacking game. Here's what Sid said on it: Focus is, in the completely unbiased view of the author, a lot more fun to play than any board game of skill that has preceded it. Was he serious? Does he really say that Focus is better than Go? What about Christian's take on the concept with Crossfire? Now, I played some Focus, and I liked it. Can I guarantee it's The Masterpiece of Stacking Games (tm)? No, of course not. I'll try to get it into my book, but on a shaky foundation: I trust Sid Sackson.

Hex, the 1942 Piet Hein classic -- one of the most well-known board games after the ancient ones, I'd say. But I just don't get it. I played Hex, and I hated every moment of it: I had no idea what I should do on the board, and why anyone would want to play it. I am happy to have it in my book (obviously, I couldn't or shouldn't write that entry, but I found support already) but again, because I accept its stature.

Othello, an 1883 almost-folk game (the double-sided pieces prevent it from becoming 100% folk-ey, I guess). This is another game I don't get and never want to play again. And in sharp contrast with Hex, I won't put Othello in the book, no matter what anyone says (or if someone gives me a well-written text on it). I don't argue that Othello is too flat -- it certainly has depth. In an entirely subjective fashion, I say "Hex ok, Othello no". It is unreasonable to expect that anyone will follow all my arbitrary decisions. And then there is...

Pente/Renju/..., a flood of line games. These are fun to play, I enjoyed a bunch of them. They're definitely not trivial, if done right, and some are outright nifty. And I don't want any line games in my book. I believe that pattern games are mostly tactical, because they tend to be so local and combinatorial. Who's going to follow me on that? And pattern games are currently very popular. I'm not too happy about the many chain scoring games cropping up everywhere, either.

So here I stand, preaching the gospel of "these are the 24 or so best abstract games", and I can't be right. This is why I don't think that an open collaboration is good for me (or for the collaborators). Have a look at the following lists
Games of Soldiers, Games of Kings and Soldiers, Games of Towers,
painstakingly compiled by Joao Neto and containing the rules for 277+163+92 = 432 abstracts. And it stops some years ago (can't blame Joao on this, the work maintaining a data base like this is huge), so it is missing many recent designs.

In wiki-mode, we'd (hopefully!) end up with strategy articles for many, perhaps even most of these games. I don't want that! My goals are different, and I realise as I type how elitist this is: I want to promote a few, select (by me) games that I think should stand the test of time.

TL;DR: (a) I'm happy to make all my articles openly accessible, so that anyone can use them, including on a wiki. (b) I am very happy to have people chime in, on any level, from proofreading to providing full entries for games [*]. (c) I couldn't organise wiki-style cooperation although I think it's a good idea.

[*] I am not as dead set on games as the above makes it sound. For example, if someone feels strongly about AYU or ARCHIMEDES or CANNON, I could be convinced to include them even if I'm currently not prepared to write something on them myself.

So despite the atrocious length of this posting, my message is: less is more. If one takes this seriously, it forces uncomfortable decisions making collective work unlikely/impossible. That said, I am happy about support and in all sincerity, I invite collaboration!

I would guess that most if not all of us feel that our short list of favorite abstracts is highly personal and not necessarily only those games which are "prestigious." This personalization is one of the things that makes gaming such a fun hobby.

Steve


 
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David Ploog
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
I've improved the text on Amazons, in three ways: PSchulman's comment about the structure was spot on; ErrantDeed's article is a treasure trove I've mined a bit (still not finished on that one); more diagrams/concepts (for example, I now distinguish between *mobility* and *flexibility*).

swshogimeyers wrote:
I would guess that most if not all of us feel that our short list of favorite abstracts is highly personal and not necessarily only those games which are "prestigious." This personalization is one of the things that makes gaming such a fun hobby.
Sure, but that was only half my point. I tried to argue that I am ready to cover some games I personally don't like but not all of them. And I spell out this argument because I've been asked about cooperation.

Collaboration is good, and I'm really for it. But I think it's honest to state my limits up-front.

On a positive note: BGG has high-quality texts on Dan Troyka's Breakthrough and David Whitcher's Cannon. These games are very good, and while not in my list of must-haves, I will contact the authors.
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
dpeggie wrote:
Sure, but that was only half my point. I tried to argue that I am ready to cover some games I personally don't like but not all of them. And I spell out this argument because I've been asked about cooperation.

Collaboration is good, and I'm really for it. But I think it's honest to state my limits up-front.

On a positive note: BGG has high-quality texts on Breakthrough (Dan Troyka) and Cannon (David Whitcher). These games are very good, and while not in my list of must-haves, I will contact the authors.
I think really, the only way to do this is through collaboration. Each of us is only expert at a small number of games. I feel like I'm only really qualified to comment on a couple of games outside the ones I design myself, and the same thing is true for most of us.

(Among the games you plan to cover, Slither is the only one I feel qualified to comment on)

I feel like the thing to do here is to decide on the games you want to cover, and then seek out the people who are expert at it. For example: send messages to the top players at Little Golem, soliciting contributions.
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David Ploog
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
milomilo122 wrote:
David Ploog wrote:
Collaboration is good, and I'm really for it. But I think it's honest to state my limits up-front.
I think really, the only way to do this is through collaboration. Each of us is only expert at a small number of games. I feel like I'm only really qualified to comment on a couple of games outside the ones I design myself, and the same thing is true for most of us.
(Emphasis mine.)

Everything here depends on the meaning of "this". In my experience, disagreements between humans have two typical sources: (1) miscommunication, (2) different priorities. I'll try to sort out the communication, so we can compare our priorities.

My goal is to draw people into playing abstract games. I want to achieve this through a book (more generally, some kind of publication). There are already many books/pages with long lists of rules for games. I decidedly want to avoid that. Here's why: if someone gives me a long list of anything (food recipes, music files, books), I'll shrug it off. Information overload is not good advertisement. Instead, I want to highlight some exceptionally good games, that cover a wide range within the abstract design space. To show people what these games offer, I'm willing to write short articles that illustrate gameplay.

Like you, I am in no way an expert on any of these games. On the other hand, I am not trying to write "The Higher Wisdom of the Worlde's Abstractest Board Games", I'm just giving a few pointers, with lots of diagrams. This is more reachable, and I think I can offer something meaningful and non-trivial for Amazons, Epaminondas, Gonnect, Slither, Symple etc. There are games that in my opinion should be included but for which I can't do that. On those, I need help. Hex and Havannah are two examples.

In other words, I'm insolent enough to claim I can do a reasonable job despite being a total layman. What you've seen on Amazons was my experience after one tournament on LittleGolem (although I think Amazons is one of the games I grok really well). Obviously, whatever I do, it'll get better with outside input, from (not just!) experts. I am happy to listen, and I've contacted better players, and for example the Slither article benefited from that tremendously -- just like you suggested.

Back on "this": there are hundreds of abstracts out there, and only a tiny fraction of them is lousy (let's not get into which ones, for we couldn't agree on that either...) -- most are good, and many very good. If you wanted to write guides for all the (very) good ones, then I agree, that's only possible by coordinated and systematically distributed work. But my sights are lower than that because I believe (=that's a personal assessment, a priority) a smaller selection is more palatable and will draw more people.

I love writing and have an easy and fun time doing it. I won't run out of games to cover but I may run out of time or energy. Feedback on anything I write is highly appreciated. I am happy to accept contributions but please talk to me beforehand, so we can sync our board game philosophies. In any case, whatever I write is free to use for anyone.
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christian freeling
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)

I think I understand Symple reasonably well. Someone understanding it really well would be better of course, but I don't know anyone personally.
Havannah is another matter. I also understand it reasonably well, but that puts me just above mediocrity, just look at the ratings at LG. I'm sure there are players there that are far better qualified, but of course I don't know if any of them would agree to do it.
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David Ploog
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
Christian: I'll get in touch with you once I pick up Symple. Probably collect some ideas myself and show them to you.

On Havannah, I am not worried: this is played on LittleGolem, and there are some outstanding players there (better than needed for this project). I am sure it will be possible to get competent support.

The entries I'm slightly worried about are those where (a) I have no clue and (b) I'm not aware of an online community. Naturally, I'll leave those games for last
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David Ploog
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Re: Some short articles about board games (currently Amazons & Slither)
The new versions on Amazons and Slither sort of contain everything I can say about these games right now. Additional stuff would need your input

Right now, I am writing on Symple and on Lines of Action. The uploaded Symple text is very rough. Help is sought -- any problem you make is most probably better than mine!

Feedback is always welcome, especially of the critical + constructive kind!
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