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Subject: What is your proven over years all-time favorite game? rss

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Jared Wilson
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Port Perry
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Kingdom Death: Monster hands down my favorite game, no question.
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vgambit
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Mage Knight. I rarely get it to the table, but when I do, if I actually play it, I enjoy it like the first time, every time.

As for video games, I'm a bit torn. I wanna say Bayonetta because I've actually beaten it on the highest difficulty multiple times, and it never really gets old, but I'm starting to lean more towards Monster Hunter: World. I've been playing that series since the beta of the first game on PS2 15 years ago, and I still love it. The latest version's updates keep finding new ways to improve the experience. All they need to do is de-genericize some of the weapons, and it'll pretty much be perfect. That and arbitrary weapon reskinning, but that'll never happen.
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Dave Matthew
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One of my few favorites is Space Hulk: Death Angel – The Card Game

It's a card game, portable and hard to master unfortunately out of print.
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David Kennedy
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Easily, my all-time favorite solo game is Hans Stockhausen's reboot of his The Lost Cause: The American Civil War, 1861-1865 and The Lost Cause: Expansion Kit. (You really needed the expansion kit to get the full game.) Years ago, Hans and I collaborated on his reboot. He did the design work; I handled development. Sadly, the project languished with the publisher for a couple of years before we gave up. Recently, Hans asked me to revive the project.

So for the past month, I've been playing the reboot again. Wow! Just a beautiful experience. It is about the U.S. Civil War. I've never had any interest in the era. This game got me to read a lot about this period of American history.

I find the gameplay beguiling and mesmerizing. The game has a lot of moving parts. But, I don't mind setting it up. In fact, I just love looking at the game imagining how things are going to go. Which Confederate Initiative card should I select this year? The narrative is very strong. The game really evokes the era.

It is also an enormous amount of fun to play. There is a real ebb and flow to events. Every time you battle, the unexpected looms. With multiple crises afflicting your position, you must carefully ponder which is the most pressing and how do you want to deal with each in the long run -- battle, blockade, diplomacy, politics, resources. If you start poorly, you really can rally and recover. It is tough. But, you have this powerful sense if you just hang tough, you might be able to pull it out. The moment is sublime when you do.

Lately, I've posted some GeekItems out on the monthly SGOYT GeekList. Take a look.

The Lost Cause Reimagined

The Death of General Lee
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Trogdor The Burninator
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Ladysmith
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Just dropped in to add a video game that I had the most fun with: Portal 2
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J. @kinson
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Grant
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I forgot that we were also talking about video games.

The only that I continue to play off and on so far is the original XCOM series particularly extended by the modding community of OpenXCOM.
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Hi

Nations: The Dice Game by along chalk. It's quick, thinky and whenever I fail to beat my high score I just know that if I had chosen one different tile, made one slightly different decision, or just rolled that one different result, I could have done it...

As for video games, I have to think back over 20 years to my PC game days - and it's either Civilization 2, Tomb Raider 1, or System Shock 1. All completely immersive and they all took me out of the real world in a truly addictive way. But in terms of replayability, the winner has to be Civilization 2 - the most perfect version of the game there has ever been.

SJS

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B Chee
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"The destiny of nations is shaped by the plangent vicissitude of destroying enemy flattops, interdicting their convoys, and severing their reinforcements and supply lines. And, if you make ace along the way... well, that's just gravy."
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"The destiny of nations is shaped by the plangent vicissitude of destroying enemy flattops, interdicting their convoys, and severing their reinforcements and supply lines. And, if you make ace along the way... well, that's just gravy."
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Car Wars -- my game group played this all through high school from the 1985 Deluxe Edition until we graduated, and then played it some more in the army, and then thereafter, whilst in undergraduate school. Lots of great memories. A few years ago, I was a backer on their Kickstarter for the Classic Edition revival.
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Arvid
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The only solo game's that I've owned long enough to meet the criteria are Space Hulk: Death Angel – The Card Game and Race for the Galaxy with Race for the Galaxy: The Gathering Storm. I really don't prefer one over the other. They scratch different itches and are both wonderful games. They are not my absolute favorite games but certainly proven.

As for video games... I was never much of a video game player. I tend to run DOOM II in an emulator every other year or so. Love it.
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Amun Rah
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For board games, in practice it would be Aerion. Ease of play, depth and replayability overtakes everything else long term. Other replayable deep games are heavier, so the extra setup and overhead means they don't hit the table often. Ideally I'd say Spirit Island, Mage Knight, or other similar heavy games, but I like it more than it actually gets played.

For video games, sometimes I play games for years, but there is no one I kept coming back. Ideally, there are many highly regarded classics in every genre, but for me, in practice, not a single one, really. Even if I played some for thousands of hours they get dumped for some reason or another. Funny enough, there is one that currently fits the criteria, but I wouldn't say it fits the intention of the criteria. This War of Mine because of its heavy emotional nature I can only play once a year, and it gets one new episode every year or so. Just coincidence.
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p55carroll
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"Adopt the pace of nature: her secret is patience." --Emerson
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Arah wrote:
Other replayable deep games are heavier, so the extra setup and overhead means they don't hit the table often. Ideally I'd say Spirit Island, Mage Knight, or other similar heavy games, but I like it more than it actually gets played.
That's a good point, and I guess it's the same for me. I want to give a shout-out to Magic Realm, but it's been a very long time since I've bothered to set it up, review the rules, and play it.

But I've gotten to where I rarely set up any board game for solo play. I've played some excellent ones, such as Nemo's War and Space Hulk: Death Angel – The Card Game, and at the time I told myself I'd be playing them over and over for a long time. But I haven't. It's because computer games are so much more convenient.

When it comes to those, my longtime favorite is Master of Orion. I just finished a game of it this morning. I've been playing it since it was new--and yes, I still prefer the original game; it's the most streamlined.

A new-to-me PC strategy game, Dominions, may topple MOO and claim the number-one spot in time. So far I'm so pleased with it that I can't stop playing--or thinking about it when I'm not playing. I even look forward to reading or rereading the manual.
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Patrick Carroll wrote:
That's a good point, and I guess it's the same for me. I want to give a shout-out to Magic Realm, but it's been a very long time since I've bothered to set it up, review the rules, and play it.

But I've gotten to where I rarely set up any board game for solo play. I've played some excellent ones, such as Nemo's War and Space Hulk: Death Angel – The Card Game, and at the time I told myself I'd be playing them over and over for a long time. But I haven't. It's because computer games are so much more convenient.

I usually relegate digital to action, narrative and relaxing games. Ironically, I categorize all strategy and grand strategy games as relaxing. And leave the actual thinking to board games. This is because the market for digital is so much bigger and developers usually benefit much more for dumbing down their games than making them harder. Is it just me that thinks it is easier to make circuits in Factorio or designing an interplanetary rocket ship in Kerbal Space Program than juggling a 3-4 handed Aeon's End, 2-3 spirit Spirit Island game or a solo Aerion game?
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p55carroll
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Arah wrote:
I usually relegate digital to action, narrative and relaxing games. Ironically, I categorize all strategy and grand strategy games as relaxing. And leave the actual thinking to board games. This is because the market for digital is so much bigger and developers usually benefit much more for dumbing down their games than making them harder. Is it just me that thinks it is easier to make circuits in Factorio or designing an interplanetary rocket ship in Kerbal Space Program than juggling a 3-4 handed Aeon's End, 2-3 spirit Spirit Island game or a solo Aerion game?
Actually, most all strategy games are hard enough for me. People complain about the weak AI and say PC strategy games are only good for multiplayer, but I'm just not that smart a player, I guess.

But it's hard for me to get past the feeling that I ought to be playing a computer game quickly. Even though I steer clear of real-time games, something about the computer just seems fast. If my AI opponents make their moves in an instant, I feel I should do that too. So I don't often slow down and study a situation.

It's worse in games like Civilization where you're prompted all the time: Wanna do this? Wanna do that? How 'bout this city--what do you want to build here? Soon I find myself just reacting to prompts instead of thinking my way through a game. One reason I like Master of Orion is that there's less prompting.

Lately I've been learning PC games that play more like board games--Dominions and Civil War II. They're not games I can just click away at; I have to think things through somewhat just to make the games work (and get a clue as to what's going on).

Still, those are pretty big, deep, complex games. Often I want something lighter and quicker but still interesting.
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Patrick Carroll wrote:
Still, those are pretty big, deep, complex games. Often I want something lighter and quicker but still interesting.

They can be very complex internally and some require learning a lot of concepts, but after all that you still end up with a simple game, because every complex part tends to get QoL improvements or interfaces that simplify things. So let's say all that learning means some digital games just have a bigger rulebook, but the gameplay itself is simplified.

In sandbox games and simulations you often aren't required to do anything, yet some like Factorio or Kerbal Space Program are hard to learn (and design some stuff).

For a reverse analogy, let's say you had a butler in a board game that told you a lot of thigs: That opponent is about to beat you, you should do this, you are running low on wood, and instantly fixes any rules errors. A lot easier.
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p55carroll
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Arah wrote:
Patrick Carroll wrote:
Still, those are pretty big, deep, complex games. Often I want something lighter and quicker but still interesting.

They can be very complex internally and some require learning a lot of concepts, but after all that you still end up with a simple game, because every complex part tends to get QoL improvements or interfaces that simplify things. So let's say all that learning means some digital games just have a bigger rulebook, but the gameplay itself is simplified.

In sandbox games and simulations you often aren't required to do anything, yet some like Factorio or Kerbal Space Program are hard to learn (and design some stuff).

For a reverse analogy, let's say you had a butler in a board game that told you a lot of thigs: That opponent is about to beat you, you should do this, you are running low on wood, and instantly fixes any rules errors. A lot easier.
Well, I dislike most video games and video-game genres. I like strategy games, but I dislike many aspects of them--such as being able to automate anything I don't want to have to do.

Yet that leaves a handful of PC strategy games that I like so much that I'll play those rather than go to the trouble of "setting the table" to play a board game by myself.
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