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Håkan König
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magic The Gathering

Probably no other game can stir so much discussion, whether you like it or not. There are so much things to consider - game play, deck construction, and most importantly PRICE.

Let's take the bad part first:
Money
Almost which way you look at it you'll find that MagicTG costs money to play, much money if you want to play competetively, and very much money if you want to play on the pro tour. Because every 4 months a new set of card arrives for you to collect, and play with, and usually only the latest sets are allowed in tournaments. This means that a deck that is the best of the pack this year can be useless next year because some cards you need is suddenly not allowed anymore. But it also means that older cards become more valuable because they become more rare, so if you play in tournaments where older cards are allowed, you may a) have to spend a lot of time finding the card you want/need and b) pay a lot of money for it.
In general there are 4 ways of aquiring new cards. Playing Limited tournaments (see below), buying boosters, buying pre-constructed decks and trading. A booster consists of 15 cards from a specific set. A pre-constructed deck is 40 or 60 cards, depending on what set they belong to. In theory, the trading should consist of 'I have a lot of these cards and I'll trade them for something you have a lot of', but since there are different 'rarity's' of cards, you usually have a lot of the same things, and that's when money come into trading too. The one who can afford to buy the specific card he need have a distinct advantage.
In all, you can spend almost as much money as you want on Magic, because when you finally have collected all the english cards, then it's time to start looking for the german cards, the italian cards....

Deck contruction
Blocks
Like I mentioned, cards are released in sets. One set is released every 4 months. The sets are grouped 3 and 3 into blocks. And to add to this there also are basic editions which now are released once every two years, The basic editions also includes an official basic rulebook which tells you most things you need to know. There is also an extended rulebook online which contains rules for everything that you nned to know about playing Magic.
Constructed formats
In a constructed format, the referee tells you in advance what sets/blocks etc that is allowed to use for this particular tournament. Ther are a number of official formats, like Standard, Extended and Vintage. In Standard only cards from the last two blocks plus the latest basic edition is allowed. In Vintage almost every card ever printed is allowed, with some exceptions.
After finding out what format is used for playing you go home and try to construct a deck that will win the tournament, using cards from teh announced sets. You also try to guess what others will play so you can defend against them and attack at their weakest points. This is part of the MetaGame. Spending a couple of hours online every week to find out what others have played successfully in tournaments lately will tell you a lot of the metaGame as it is right now.
Limited
In Limited you get a 'limited' cardpool to construct your deck from. The 3 official versions of Limited is Draft, Sealed Deck and Rochester Draft.
Draft goes like this: each player gets a booster and opens it. He selects 1 card from this booster and sends the remaining 14 cards to his neighbor on his left. At the same time he receives a pack from his neighbor on his right, picks it up, selects a card and passes it to his left, and this continues until every one have 15 cars selected. Then a new booster is opened, but this time the cards are passed to the right instead of to the left. Then lastly a third booster is opened and the process is repeated a last time, this time again sent to the left. Then when everybody have 45 cards, you start constructing your deck as usual from these cards, adding basic lands in the process.
Sealed Deck is easier. Every player gets a couple of boosters and sometimes also a tournament pack. Each player the constructs his deck from these cards.
Rochester draft is quite unusual because of iits long preparation time. YOu need just as many boosters as in regular draft, but only one booster at the time is opened and put on the table for every one to see. Then the players in turn choose one card until it reaches the last player at the table who chooses two cards and then the order goes back along the table much like the placement of settlements is Settlers of Catan.

Card Types
Card type: Spells
A Spell is a card that costs mana to play. Sometime the cost may be 0 but for reasons of gameplay, 0 is considered to be a cost albeit a very low one. Every card has a mana cost printed on the top. If there are mana symbols then only mana of the stated type can be used in order to cast the spell. Most cards have a mix of uncolored mana and 1 single type of mana. Any card with only one type of mana (and uncolored) is said to be a card of that color. Some cards mix different kinds of required mana, and these are called Gold cards.
Card type: Permanents
Permanent is a card that remains in play after it has been played. Lands are Permanents but not Spells. All Spells except Instants and Sourceries are Permanents.
A permanent can have abilities that are only used if certain additional requirements are met (i.e. extra mana played, cards discarded etc.) These are called activated abilities. Many permanents have activated abilities that can onlybe used once in a players turn. To indicate that this ability has been used, the card is turned 90° so it lies on it's side. This is called tapping the card, and turning it back right again untapping the card.
Card type: Lands
Lands are cards that produce mana or magic energy. This is needed to cast a spell or play any non-land card. Basic lands may be added to any limited deck after the initial selecting of cards. Basic lands are also the only cards that may appear with more than 4 copies in a deck. Some (non-basic) lands can produce more than one type of mana or more than one unit of mana. Mana comes in 6 kinds: Plains/White (W), Swamp/Black (B), Islands/Blue (U), Mountains/Red (R), Forests/Green (G) and uncolored (from certain non-basic lands).
Card type: Instants
These are 'surprise spells' which can be played almost at any time in the game, whether it is your turn or not. These have effects that are immediate and the card is discarded immediately after it has been used.
Card type: Sourcery
These are similar to Instants, but they can only be played on your own turn before or after combat and not during combat. These also are discarded after their use.
Card type: Enchantment
An enchantment is a play that remains in play after it has been played. It can affect everything in play so it is very effective when used in the right way.
Card type: Enchant Creature/Land/Artifact/Permanent
This is a special form of enchantment that only affects a certain card, upon which the enchantment is placed. When the enchanted card leaves play then the enchantment is also discarded.
Card type: Creature
A crature is the fighter in Magic. It is used in combat , both to attack and defend. Usually it can do both, but not at the same time. A creature is slow, because you cannot use it on the turn it is played. It is discarded only when it is killed. Every creature have two important stats: Power and Toughness. Power says how much damage the creature will give when it attacks and toughness how much it can take in a turn.
Card type: Artifact
An artifact is a spell that remains in play. It represents a constructed object and as such it usually must be used in order for it to make a difference. There are some artifacts that affects the whole world without the need of special actions though. All artifacts only need colorless mana and can thus be added to almost any kind of deck.
Card type: Artifact Creatures
An Artifact Creature is a constructed creature and does not differ from regular creatures except it is colorless.
Card type: Artifact Equipment
An equipment itself can be though of as an enchantment for creatures. The big difference is that once it is in play it is not attached to a creature, but that is a separate action which costs additional mana. It is however possible to move an equipment from one creature to another during play, and if teh creature would be discarded, then the equipment remains in play. This makes equipment a potentially very powerful part of the deck.

Gameplay
Finally, you have aquired a number of cards that you want to play, added lands to make sure you have enough mana available. Now what? Well, get yourself an opponent who have the same prerequisites as you. If you're in a tournament you don't need to worry, that's what the referee's are there for. If you are playing friendly then you'll just have to agree on the tems before you play.
Each player then shuffles their decks, and draw 7 cards.
Then, a turn goes like this:
*Upkeep
Beginning of your turn
**Untap
Any used cards are turned right
**Draw a card
Take the top card from your deck (or library) and put it on your hand.
*Main
This is where all Land cards (1 per round), Creatures, Artifacts and Enchantments are played so they are available in the rest of the game.
*Combat
Now we're going to fight. At any time during this part is it possible for both you and your opponent to play Instants or activate abilities of Artifacts and Creatures that can affect combat.
**Declare attackers
This is where you tell your opponents which creatures you want to attack with. Any creature used in attacking is tapped so it can't be used later in the turn-
**Declare blockers
And this is where your opponent tells you what he wants to use to defend himself with.
**Combat damage
Once you've decide what attackers and blockers go into the combat the combat damage is asigned. If a blocker is used on a attacker, that attacker will not be able to hurt your opponent, unless the attacker has some ability that can find the opponent anyway. But in general a simple 1/1 rat can block a 11/11 creature and stop the excess 10p of damage from hurting anyone.
**End of combat
Some creatures have abilities that resolve now before you are allowed to continue with a second main phase.
*Main
This is where all Land cards (1 per round), Creatures, Artifacts and Enchantments are played so they are available in the rest of the game. This round is identical to the main phase before combat, but anything played now will not affect the combat as such.
*End of turn
Now you and your opponent can play a last instant spell befre his turn starts. First player to reduce his opponent from 20 to 0 life wins. In tournaments you often play best of 3 or 5 to minimize the effect of a bad deal.


Reflections
So what is the fuss about? Well, there is a great game here, no doubt about it. The whole idea about combat, spells to aid combat and a very unique way of fuelling each spell is really great. 10/10 for gameplay. Once you actually get to the table in order to play that is. The fact that in order to play you need to spend a rather big sum of money is not good. I mean, all games costs ~30-100USD, but with magic, you can spend that amount every month, and still not have the cards you need t create a good deck for constructed play. This is not a game where gameplay skills decides the game. Nowhere near that. What decides teh game is how many cards you have available in the current format, and the metagame around that particular format. Which means that draft or sealed deck is actually much more about skill - but they cost money to play so no matter how you do you need to pay a lot of money if you want to play. Money aspect: 1/10. The metagame itself is quite interesting to follow, but as it changes so frequently and you need to get new cards every time it changes it is another factor that costs you money. 4/10 for metagame. In all, there is a good game here, but unfortunately it has been hidden under a huge pile of money that you need to have in order to play and do well. Thus, I rate this game a 6.5/10 for I still think it's a good game, but it's costing me way too much money and I don't like that.
 
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Re:User Review
Hakan;

I dispute the fact that you take into account the perceived price of the game in issuing your opinion/rating of the game. MtG is a CHEAP GAME. Spend $10-$20 and you can get a huge number of commons, uncommons and land from eBay, enough for a whole play group to play with for years. There is simply no need to compete in a tournament setting if all you want to do is play the game.

Tha cost of tournament play has nothing to do with the game of MtG.

Fawkes
 
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Yehuda Berlinger
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Re:User Review
hakko504 (#79290),

I agree with Richard. I don't understand why it is necessary to stress the tournament league when describing a game. If you were describing the game of football to someone, would you say that the only way to play is to spend $100,000 on training, give up your day job, and compete for professional play? All you need to play football are people, a field, and a ball.

You can play infinite amounts of games picking random cards, or constructing and tweaking decks, from a couple of thousand cards which can be had for $10 - $40. (I have been playing for 10 years, and haven't spent any money for the past 9.) Constructing a top-class tournament deck out of all available magic cards and keeping it current costs money, but it is a very peripheral thing to many players.

Also, unless the rules have change since I last looked (which is entirely possible):

- "4 of each card maximum" for a card is only a tournament rule, not a game rule. (and in fact, some tournaments allow more than 4, such as sealed deck).
- 40 cards is the minimum rule, according to the actual rules.
- upkeep comes after untap.
- life loss is checked at any time, not just at the end of the round.

Yehuda
 
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Mark McEvoy
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Re:User Review
Shade_Jon (#79498),

The newest 'actual rules' are a little hazy on 40 vs 60 cards. From the 8e rulebook:

Quote:
Deck
At least forty cards of your choice, well shuffled. After you learn to play and start
building your own Magic decks, your decks should have at least sixty cards of
your choice.


That seems to imply that 40 is only acceptable for beginners.

There is now one 'beginning phase', which includes the untap step followed upkeep and draw steps. A subtle difference, but a difference all the same.

 
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thatmarkguy (#79556),

Interesting. When we play we still play with 4e rules, so it's still untap-upkeep-draw for us. We also still check for player death only at the end of a player's turn, so players can still go into negatives. And we play for ante. cool

Playing for ante is the coolest part of MtG that's been forgotten simply due to the secondary market. You play with your Lotus, you'd better be ready to ante it up if it's drawn. I'd think that requiring ante would make tournaments a million times more interesting these days.
 
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Håkan König
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Re:User Review
Quote:
Shade_Jon wrote:
hakko504 (#79290),

I agree with Richard. I don't understand why it is necessary to stress the tournament league when describing a game. If you were describing the game of football to someone, would you say that the only way to play is to spend $100,000 on training, give up your day job, and compete for professional play? All you need to play football are people, a field, and a ball.

You can play infinite amounts of games picking random cards, or constructing and tweaking decks, from a couple of thousand cards which can be had for $10 - $40. (I have been playing for 10 years, and haven't spent any money for the past 9.) Constructing a top-class tournament deck out of all available magic cards and keeping it current costs money, but it is a very peripheral thing to many players.

Also, unless the rules have change since I last looked (which is entirely possible):

- "4 of each card maximum" for a card is only a tournament rule, not a game rule. (and in fact, some tournaments allow more than 4, such as sealed deck).
- 40 cards is the minimum rule, according to the actual rules.
- upkeep comes after untap.
- life loss is checked at any time, not just at the end of the round.

Yehuda


First of all, my experience of even casual magic is only in tournament form. Whenever we get a few people together we arrange some form of tournament, using magic's normal rules for tournaments. Thus my bias towards tournaments.

- 4 cards maximum is a rule for constructed play(§100.2 of the magic comprehensive rules 041001 http://www.wizards.com/magic/comprules/MagicCompRules041001....), not limited. Sorry if that wasn't clear from my review
- 40 cards is the minimum rule, according to the actual rules. Same here, 40 for limited play(§100.3), 60 for constructed(§100.2).
- Order of untap/upkeep was taken from the MtGO. Seems like it was my version was slightly out of date. The correct should be that the beginning phase includes (in order) *untap *upkeep *Draw Card
- life loss is a case of bad formatting. It should have been in a paragraph of it own, it was not intended to make it look like it is only checked at the end of the game.
 
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Michael Webb
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Re:User Review
Fawkes wrote:

Interesting. When we play we still play with 4e rules, so it's still untap-upkeep-draw for us. We also still check for player death only at the end of a player's turn, so players can still go into negatives. And we play for ante. cool

Playing for ante is the coolest part of MtG that's been forgotten simply due to the secondary market. You play with your Lotus, you'd better be ready to ante it up if it's drawn. I'd think that requiring ante would make tournaments a million times more interesting these days.



Wow Fawkes, you're living in the dark ages

I used to like the old rules until I started playing control / permission decks in the newer system, and trust me, it is hard to go back after that.

While you give up the easier functionality of the stack (for those who aren't aware: the old rules for Magic followed the same "Last In, First Out" (LIFO) rules as post 5E, but forced the entire stack to resolve once the top spell on the stack was permitted to) you gain all kinds of incredibly nifty tricks that don't exist otherwise...primarily having to do with card drawing effects.

For example, I'm sitting on an Ancestral, but no counters. In the old system I would be forced to use it at some earlier point in the turn (upkeep, etc) if I thought my opponent was going to do something I would need a counter for. Under post 5E rules I can wait for them to cast something that bothers me, respond with Ancestral, let the Ancestral resolve, draw some cards, and then use those drawn cards in response to the as-yet-unresolved spell on the stack.

There are all kinds of entertaining aspects to this kind of stuff too. For example, in tourneys sub-optimal counters such as Arcane Denial (while, at least it was a hard counter) and Memory Lapse would sometimes be used. After 5E they went to horribly marginal because in a Blue on Blue match a counter war would end up going something like this:

(note: "Blue Aggro" just denotes any deck which would be running counters but not enough Blue mana as such to support hard counters...usually aggressive environmentally tuned decks, the example should suffice though)

Stasis Player - I'll cast Stasis
Blue Aggro Player - I'll respond with Counterspell
Stasis Player - I'll respond with Force of Will, pitching
Blue Aggro - I'll respond with Arcane Denial
SP - I'll allow Arcane Denial to resolve.
(SP draws 2, BA draws 1)
(Stack currently Stasis - Counter)
SP - I'll respond with Counterspell
BA - I'll Memory Lapse that
SP - I'll allow that to resolve.
(Counterspell goes on top of the Stasis player's library)
(Stack again Stasis - Counterspell)
SP - I'll Gush, alternate casting cost
BA - I'll allow that to resolve
(SP scoops some islands and draws 2 cards, including the Memory Lapsed Counterspell)
SP - I'll Counter
BA - Ok....


Basically the stack rules allow all kinds of nifty interactions via card drawing and such...another entertaining aspect is when using, say, cards like Cunning Wish, an instant which allows you to fetch instants from your sideboard: You can respond to a spell by Wishing, getting a counter (or card drawing...or whatever) from your SB and then casting it in response to the original spell.


On your other points I heartily agree though, I despise the "Instant Death" rule (I think all ex-Prosp Bloom players would ) and I wish ante had never left the game.

I guess when I take it all-together though, the newer rules make Magic a much more interesting game to me, so I'm willing to take the loss of a few things that I used to enjoy.

(not that I play anymore anyhoo...so this is all moot )
 
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Michael;

Yeah, I've kibitzed in a couple of games in recent years (!) while waiting for friends to finish up. The new stacking stuff is alien to me, and it does kill a lot of the older cards. Since most of our stash of, what, 10,000 cards is from Weatherlight and prior, it's only natural that we play with the older rules. Like Banding, which I'll wager no one knows how to play these days. Besides, I love crap commons like Force Spike too much!

Ante was the best part of Magic. It put the FEAR OF GOD into you when you decide to play with power. You never know when your ultra expensive deck will manascrew and you'll get killed by the $10 mono white weenie or mono blitz black, and you'll lose your anted dual land or worse.
 
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Re:User Review
hakko504 (#79290),
Nice review, although I agree with the others - cost is entirely up to you (and how many tourneys you want to participate in). And, of course, the turn order should be untap-upkeep, as you noted in your own reply
 
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ulises treinta
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I cannot agree with the majority, this is a expensive game. The meaty cards are rare ones, and around those cards is where the posibilities are. Rare cards are expensive, you only get one per booster pack (here 4 €s). Of course, you can play only with commons and uncommons (one can say in warhammer you can play only with plastic figures, say only chaos warriors), but that is lite magic, not the full game. If you want to build a deck, you need a large base of cards to select from, and say 15-20 boosters give you a very very modest 300 card base (a initial one) from where to choose. Of course, at a price of 80 €, per player. Even spending that money you dont get a lot of posibilities from where build the deck. The "cheaper" way of play magic is trading cards, but that is a game by itself.
 
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Yehuda Berlinger
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Re:User Review
ulises31 (#85790),

Again, you are CHOOSING to play ONLY tournament worthy decks. If you need this card and that card to make the absolute best deck available to play, yes, it will cost you money.

Now pretend for just a moment, that your only exposure to Magic is $10 spent on a thousand common cards, after which you and your friends get on a plane and spend a year at the south pole. You can play thousands and thousands of games of Magic, each time a new and different way, all for $10.

Most of us live this way. Yes, there are tournaments somewhere in Israel - who cares? When my friends come over to play, I take some random cards and we build decks and play.

Now, in addition to casual play, you can CHOOSE to play Magic like a grand treasure hunt and lifestyle, chasing around the globe for better cards, etc... Yes, your decks will be more tournament worthy. But you know what, they will be less fun to play with your casual friends.

Magic is not expensive to play. It is expensive to compete at a tournament. Just like football is not expensive to play, just expensive to play in the Pro-Leagues.

Yehuda
 
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Rich Wysong
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Rebuttal for the casual players
I started out playing casually in 1995. I was in the military, and didn't really play much. It was mostly off and on through the years. I almost quit playing since it was getting boring, but went to GP London in 2001 and rekindled my interest. You see, this is where the fun is: competitive magic. It is a whole 'nother realm of playing. I would easily rate competitive tournament play at 10 for the fun and challenge. Nothing comes close. There's a reason for the oodles and oodles of websites dedicated to magic. There's a reason why my local gaming shop has tournaments every night from Wednesday through Saturday, with turnouts that beat any other game played there. Compare the "world" gaming championships over on the east coast to Magic Worlds... and the attendances for Grand Prixs and such. In Europe, Grand Prixs often top over 1000 people! I don't really play much any more, but I *still* check out WotC's tournament locator any time I travel, just to see if I can catch at least one tournament (usually looking for Vintage or Legacy).

Trying to qualify for pro tours, following the pro tour and the players, competing neck and neck with the few other competative players in your area in local tournaments: that's why people shell out ridiculous amounts of money for cardboard. That's *real* Magic. And the bottom line is that: yes, it is much too expensive and time consuming. I don't wholeheartedly recommend it to everyone. It takes *at least* a hundred bucks a year to keep your decks up to par to where you can win 12-20 man local tournaments.

But... if you just want to sling cards casually, it's not a terrible game. It's far from a 10 at that point IMHO. Playing with the same cards over and over, with bland decks against bland decks is rather boring for me at this point, and I don't find it very enjoyable. I get a taste of this everytime I play a non-competitive deck in a tournament.

In short: The depth of this game is simply unrivaled, but you won't get much depth with $50 worth of cards.
 
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Philip Thomas
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Yeah, I can get better games if I am not into competitive play. Another point to bear in mind is that if 1 person in a group decides to make the upgrade to using rares etc, then the game gets less fun for everyone, unless everyone can upgrade to the same degree.

Also, frankly, I don't want to play a game where there is a chance the card order will manascrew me no matter how good a deck or playing style I have...
 
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Tofu Emu
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Magic is really getting a short shift here. It is a truly great game with outstanding basic rules ands lots of interesting mechanics from the various sets. I played a lot of OLS and really enjoyed the tribe dynamics, morph and the importance of efficiency in deck building. That being said:

Building tourney quality decks is both unbelievably expensive and completely unnecessary.

Deck strength varies tremendously, so a mediocre pile loses to a tourney deck every time.

To avoid the above, draft! I've never found building decks to be very interesting; you end up pursuing the same strategies and counters and are quickly bored. For a far more interesting time, get together a group of 4-8 people and limited draft a good sized collection of commons and uncommons with a few rares thrown in. If you want to, skip the rares! Some rares are crap but bomby rares can be unbalancing. You can buy the packs, draft them, shuffle them up, draft them again, etc. When you re-draft you don't even have to worry about equalizing rares and uncommons (although it is slightly preferable). Once you have your drafts, play round robin.

For those that don't know drafts, the general rule is that each person starts with 15 cards, picks one and passes the pack to the next person. This happens simultaneously. The great thing about drafting is that there is a lot of skill in the draft in identifying what the people ahead of you are drafting and in signaling to the people behind you. Then there is skill in building the deck, and finally there is skill in playing.

The overall experience is very satisfying, and magic is one of the deepest yet most enjoyable quick games that you can play.
 
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Luca Iennaco
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Philip Thomas wrote:
Also, frankly, I don't want to play a game where there is a chance the card order will manascrew me no matter how good a deck or playing style I have...

Oddly enough you do not seem to have problems with games equally conditioned by drawing "the wrong cards" (and also affected by dice... and lasting 2 hours rather than 20 minutes; eg. Twilight Struggle ). How is it?
 
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