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Ender Wiggins
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Introduction

Do you like trick taking games with regular playing cards? Even if it's not your first choice for playing games, everyone at some time is in a group where people are insistent on playing classic card games. Cribbage. Whist. Euchre. Bridge. Hearts. Spades. "Don't give us these fancy newfangled games with cards that have beans or trains on them, or that require a box larger than a doctor's emergency medical kit," they say. "Just a deck of playing cards is all we need. Out with the new, in with the old." I'm sure we've all met folks like this. And you know, trick taking games aren't bad once in a while. It's just a matter of knowing some decent games to play with regular playing cards! And so it's worth equipping your quiver of gaming arrows with some good trick taking games so at least you're not stuck playing some 3 hour game similar to Phase 10, when you could be playing something much better.

But now here's the problem: there are lots of excellent trick taking games that cater to groups of four or more. But what about if there are just two of you? You could try German Whist, which is actually a decent game. But why not learn one of the classic trick taking games that really shines with two players: Schnapsen! And while you're at it, let me also introduce you to a four player version of the game that is very popular in countries like Hungary: Snapszer. I'm not Hungarian, but having recently learned Snapszer and being a long time fan of trick-taking games, I can assure you that this is also a card game well worth learning. And if you already know Schnapsen, you're already 90% of the way to learning Snapszer. So, let's get to it!

The Tell deck

Let me say right off the bat that you don't need the Tell deck to play Schnapsen. Don't quit reading here, because you can certainly play it with regular playing cards, in fact, that's probably what many people around the world do!



But it sure looks a lot prettier when you play it with a Tell deck.

But first: a word about the close connection between the game Sixty Six and Schnapsen. These are basically identical games, the only difference being that Sixty Six uses the cards Nine through Ace, whereas Schnapsen uses the cards Jack through Ace. So technically speaking, I'll be describing the rules of Sixty Six, but just to keep it simple, I'll call it Schnapsen. The gameplay in both games is virtually identical, except that with Schnapsen you get a hand of five cards instead of six cards, and the game is somewhat tighter because there are no Nines (worth no points) and every card is worth points. For the complete rules of Schnapsen (without the Nines), see here: http://www.pagat.com/marriage/schnaps.html

To play Schnapsen or Snapszer, you only need 24 cards: the Nines through Aces in four suits from a regular deck of playing cards. As already mentioned, strictly speaking playing with the Nines is called Sixty Six, and playing without the Nines is called Schnapsen, but for the purposes of this review we won't get fussy about the names.

If you want the game to have more character, you can play Schnapsen with a 24 card Tell pattern deck. Schnapsen originated in Europe, and is still popular in Germany and a large part of the region of former Austria-Hungary, and so it's no surprise that special decks are used in these countries. So before we get into the game-play, let me just introduce you to the Tell decks, since I'll be illustrating some of the game-play with cards from these decks. They are available from Piatnik, and readily available in Europe.



The artwork on the cards in these decks is absolutely stunning. The first noticeable difference is that instead of the four suits we're familiar with, these decks have the suits Acorns, Hearts, Bells, and Leaves. The artwork of the Aces represents the four seasons, respectively Winter (= Tél), Spring (= Tavasz), Summer (= Nyár), and Autumn (= Ősz):



The artwork also features different parts of the story of William Tell. Here is the hero himself:



And here we see Tell piloting the boat after escaping prison:



Here's an entire suit of cards (from the Bell suit):



Despite the differences, these cards actually correspond closely to a regular deck of cards. In fact, special decks are even available which show how the cards correspond, such as the ones pictured here:





The cards have different names, for example, instead of Queens and Jacks we have Over-Knaves and Under-Knaves, as pictured here:



But for all intents and purposes, they are identical in rank and function to Queens and Jacks. Interestingly, the Over-Knaves and Under-Knaves in a Tell deck all feature characters of the William Tell legend as follows:

Over-knaves (top row)
Wilhelm Tell (acorn) - the hero
Hermann Geszler (heart) - the evil Imperial governor
Stüssi d. Flurschütz (bell)
Ulrich Ruden (leaf)
Under-knaves (bottom row)
Rudolf Harras (acorn)
Kuoni d. Hirt (heart)
Itell Reding (bell)
Walter Fürst (leaf) - Tell's father-in-law

Do you need a Tell deck to play Schnapsen? Absolutely not. Just use a deck of regular playing cards, but if you are fortunate enough to have a Tell deck, it just enhances the experience and gives you fancy artwork to admire while you're playing. There's no real difference whatsoever, instead of Spades, Clubs, Diamonds, and Hearts we have Leaves, Acorns, Bells, and Hearts; and instead of Queens and Jacks we have Over-knaves and Under-knaves.

For the purpose of this overview, I'll mostly be using images of the game being played with the Tell deck. So let's go and learn how to play!

Schnapsen (for 2 players)

Card values

The first thing to learn is that the ranks and values of the cards are different from most other trick taking games. Cards are worth the following points:
11: Ace
10: Ten
4: King
3: Over-knaves (=Queen with regular playing cards)
2: Under-knaves (=Jack with regular playing cards)
0: Nine
Notice the value of the Ten: it is the second highest ranked card, and beats the King, Queen, and Jack.

Here are the cards from the Acorn suit, in rank:



Using regular playing cards:



Goal

The aim of the game is to reach 66 points before your opponent. Points are scored by winning tricks with the point cards above, as well as by scoring bonus points for "marriages".

Marriages

A marriage of the King and Over-knave (Queen) is worth 20 points, and 40 points in the case of the trump suit. These are declared by revealing both cards in a marriage when leading a trick, and then by playing one of the two cards. Here's an example of a King and an Over-Knave from the same suit:



Deal

The dealer gives six cards to each player.



He turns the next card face up to determine the trump. The remaining 11 cards are placed face down on this trump card as the draw pile.

Game-play

The first phase: before the deck is closed

The non-dealer then begins leading a trick, and after each trick both players draw a card. But there's an interesting twist: neither player is obliged to follow suit! As usual, the higher card of a suit wins, and can be trumped by a card from the trump suit. The fact that neither player needs to follow suit makes for some very interesting game play, and introduces a whole range of new decisions, not usually available in a trick-taking game! Aside from this fact, the game proceeds like a normal trick taking game, with the winner of a trick leading to the next trick.

Players can also gain bonus points by declaring marriages. For example, if I was leading a trick and had the King and Over-Knave of the Heart suit in my hand, and the trump was Acorns, I could show those two cards and play either of them, and score 20 bonus points. If the trump was Hearts, this would be worth 40 points. Look, I'm already close to 66! These points are scored in addition to the points scored from winning tricks. Players will often be trying to keep cards in hand that might allow them to draw the card needed in order to get such a "marriage", since these points can be lucrative.



Here's an example using regular playing cards, where the trump is a diamond, and a marriage worth 40 points is declared by revealing the King and Queen of diamonds:



The second phase: after the deck is closed

But now comes the second interesting twist of Schnapsen. Since the aim of the game is to be the first player to get to Sixty Six points, at any point after winning a trick, the person who won the trick can turn the face up trump face down. This closes the deck, and means that cards can no longer be drawn, and players play out what they have in hand.

From this point on the rules of the game change: now you must follow suit, and the rules of regular trick taking apply. But the requirement is even more strict: if you can beat the card led with a card of the same suit, you must. If you don't have a card of the same suit but you do have a trump, you must trump the card led.

This results in some fascinating gameplay. After the deck is closed, marriages can no longer be declared, and it becomes a race to be the first to get to sixty-six points. As soon as you win a trick which brings you to 66 points, you can announce the fact, and the game stops. But be warned: you need to keep track of your points mentally until this point, so you want to be sure that you actually have 66 points before claiming a win! Note that if the deck hasn't yet been "closed" and the 20 or 40 points from a marriage gets you to 66 points, you can also claim a win after showing these points (assuming you are leading and have the right to declare a marriage).

Much of the game is about timing the right moment to close the deck. This is really what makes Schnapsen unique: the moment when the deck is closed, and the rules of play change! It makes for a skilful and fascinating game! Now which card should I choose?



Other rules

There are a few other special rules, for example, being able to change the lowest trump with the face up trump after winning a trick, and getting an extra ten points for winning the last trick if all cards are played out, but I won't detail those here - the basic gameplay described above is what you'll need to get started with the game.

Scoring

Schnapsen consists of several hands where the aim is to get to seven points. You get 1 point for being the first to 66 if your opponent has at least 33 points; 2 points for being the first to 66 if your opponent has less than 33 points; 3 points for being the first to 66 if your opponent has no points. There's a handy reference chart from Gamegrunt here:



Your opponent also gets points if you close the deck but then both you and your opponent fail to get to 66 points; further, your opponent gets points if you declare that you have 66 points but upon counting your cards find that you are actually short. Keep careful track of your score in your mind!

And that's Schnapsen! A great little two hander, offering quick play, but with some very interesting decisions!

Snapszer (for 4 players)

But now what about if you have four players? As well as Ulti and Zsírozás (also a great game and easy to learn!), one of the most popular card games in Hungary is Snapszer, also called Snapszli. Essentially, it's a slight variant of Schnapsen, for four players. It's a fantastic game in its own right, and as good as most other trick taking games I've enjoyed. And if you know how to play Schnapsen, you can learn Snapszer in just a minute or two.



Like Schnapsen, Snapszer uses 24 cards (Nines through Aces). There are two main differences from the rules of Schnapsen as described above:
- The lead player looks at the first three of the six cards he is dealt, and calls another card. The player with that card will be his partner, and the called suit will be trump.
- The rules for the last part of a game of Schnapsen (you must follow suit and must beat the led card if possible) apply for the entire game in Snapszer, and there is no draw deck since all the cards are dealt out at the beginning.
So if you already know how to play Schnapsen, now you also know how to play Snapszer!

I have not had much success finding reliable English rules for four player Snapszer. So at the risk of repeating some of the rules already described for two player Schnapsen, I will provide a more detailed explanation of Snapszer (=Snapszli).

Card values

Just as with Schnapsen, the rank and value of the cards is as follows: 11: Ace; 10: Ten; 4: King; 3: Over-knave (=Queen); 2: Under-knave (=Jack); 0: Nine.

Goal

The aim of the game is for each team (the starting player and his partner; or their opponents) to reach 66 points first. Players play alone until the called trump card is played, at which point scores of partners are added together. When a player or a team has 66 points, they can claim a win.

Marriages

A marriage of the King and Over-knave (Queen) is worth 20 points (40 points for trump suit), just as in Schnapsen, and can be declared when leading a trick. In other words:
- a player can say '20': when he is leading a trick, and he has king and over-knaves in the same suit and he plays one of these two cards (in this case you get 20 points, and add this to your points from cards).
- a player can say '40': when he is leading a trick, and he has king and over-knaves in the trump suit and he plays one of these two cards (in this case you get 40 points, and add this to your points from cards).
To earn these bonus points, a player must be leading a trick, must have both cards in hand, must play one of them after revealing them, and must win at least 1 trick in the round (or else these points are forfeited).

Deal

Deal and play are anti-clockwise. The dealer deals 3 cards to each player. Based on these 3 cards, the starting player (dealer's right hand) must choose and announce a trump card.



The dealer then deals 3 cards again to each player. The player who has the trump card will be the partner of the starting player - but this remains secret until the called card is played. If the starting player has the trump card themselves in the last 3 cards dealt, he will play alone against the other three players as a team. Trump suit will be the suit of the trump card.

Game-play

The starting player (who named the trump card) leads the first trick. Thereafter the winner of each trick leads the next trick. It is compulsory to follow suit, and a player with no card of the suit led must play a trump if possible. A player who has no trumps and no card of the suit led may play any card. Subject to these rules, players are obliged to beat the highest card already played to the trick whenever they can. These rules are essentially the same as those for the second phase of Schnapsen.



Snapszer

Before leading the very first trick the starting player can say 'Snapszer', which means that he undertakes to reach 66 points without the opponents winning any tricks. The player who has the trump card also can say 'Snapszer' when his first played card is the trump card. The team loses the Snapszer if the opponent team wins any tricks.

Scoring

Snapszer: 6 points
Game: 3 points when a team has 66 points and the opponent has no tricks.
Game: 2 points when a team has 66 points and the opponent has less than 33 points.
Game: 1 points when a team has 66 points and the opponent has at least 33 points.

A win can be claimed immediately after winning a trick, or at the start of a new trick when claiming 20 or 40 bonus points from a marriage, assuming that these points give a team 66 or more points.
Scoring is individual since partnerships change each round, but the points are given to both players in the winning partnership. In the event that neither team has 66 points at the end of a round, the team that played the last trick is the winner.

Kontra

Kontra: The opponents can double the scores of a round by saying 'Kontra' before the first played card.
Rekontra: After Kontra the starting player can double again the score by saying 'Rekontra' after the first trick (the partner of the starting player also can do it when his first card is the trump card)
Subkontra: After Rekontra the opponents can again double the score by saying 'Subkontra.'

Other resources

The rules of Schnapsen can be found readily online (see here and here) and in printed resources, although be aware that some sources (including Hoyle's Games) have some important errors or omissions. The rules of Snapszer are not so readily available. I'm indebted to the Hungarian couple who first taught me how to play the game, and I also gratefully acknowledge this source, but especially the clarifications learned in email correspondence from Pál of ultinet.hu.

Want to try the game? There's an excellent website where you can play online for free with a java applet, either against computer opponents or players from around the world:
http://www.ultinet.hu/servlet/Snapszer (Hungarian)
http://www.rummynetwork.eu/servlet/Snapszer (English)
You don't even need to register. Go ahead and try the game with two players or four players, it's easy to learn, and fun to play!

What do I think?

Of all the trick taking games for two players that I've tried, Schnapsen has to be among the very best. It plays quickly. It offers interesting choices. Sure, there's some luck of the draw, but this evens out over a series of hands, and is part of the game. The aspect of closing the deck, and the changing rules creates a particularly interesting game. You need to try to set yourself up with the right cards for the part of the game where you can win your points, as well as try to get points from marriages before the deck is closed. There are many fascinating decisions to be made, and it really is a great trick-taking game. As has already been mentioned, it's equally playable with regular playing cards, as seen here:



Snapszer is somewhat different, in that it doesn't feature a turning point where the rules of play change. This is somewhat of a loss, but it makes up for that by adding another element: the "Call Partner" aspect, where a trump card is named to determine a secret partner. Particularly because the partner remains secret until the called card is played, this creates a real element of surprise and fun, as you try to figure out who is the partner, based on the decisions that are made in game play. If you've mastered Schnapsen, you certainly owe it to yourself to try the four player Snapszer as well.

What do others think?

You won't find many comments in English about Snapszer, so I'll limit this section to comments about Schnapsen. Clearly I'm not alone in my enthusiasm for the game:
"Excellent two-handed card game, right up there with cribbage and canasta and double pinochle. Really it's the best trump game for two I've ever played. This is an excellent game and deserves to be played more." - Stven Carlberg
"I love Schnapsen! Schnapsen scratches the itch that Pinochle used to scratch. Schnapsen gives two card players a nice alternative to Cribbage, Lost Cities, Gin Rummy and the like. - Gamegrunt
"Excellent two-player trick-taker. Requires total concentration!" - Mikko Saari
"A favorite of mine among two player card games — and the only two player trick taking game I care for at all. I like the tension behind when to close the stock, and the unusual cardplay without the need to follow suit." - Lindsey Dubb
"A classic card game, maybe THE Austrian national card game. - Werner Stangl
"Easily one of my favorite 2-player games (regular deck or otherwise). - Benjamin Parker

The Final Word

Like trick taking games? Have two players? Have four players? This is a time proven classic that you absolutely must try at least once.



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The complete list of Ender's pictorial reviews: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/37596
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Excellent review! As someone who took the time to write reviews for German Whist and Watten, I appreciate others' efforts to shine light on similarly obscure card games that don't get a lot of attention.

I learned to play Schnapsen a few years ago, though I haven't played since. I found the memory component to be the most challenging part of the game, though I did still enjoy it.

Watten is still my trick-taking game of choice, however.

Brian
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Peter Asimakis
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Thank you for your wonderful review!

Sixty-six is Schnapsen with the nines as you well explained. I use to watch my Dad and his brother-in-law play when I was a child. I didn't understand it but they were having a great time. Dad taught me when I was a little older and we still play. Very special moments. I have recently taught this to a close friend of mine who is an avid (and very good) Cribbage player and he loved it. He hadn't encountered a card game that made him think as much before. It certainly requires a lot of concentration and memory work to play well, especially if you want to improve. He hadn't come across a point-taking trick game before, especially where one didn't need to follow suit (most games do). Combined with the other new concepts of marriages, the 10 ranking out of its usual place, individual cards being worth points, and having to keep a mental tally of your and your opponent's score, he was blown away. All this for just two players and 24 cards!!! Probably the best two-player card game ever devised.

There are a whole lot of related games often called Ace-10 games or Marriage games.
They are worth checking out for anyone who enjoys a good game of cards.

Yes friends, Sixty-six is that good. Try it, and you will believe.

Irini Pasi,

PLB
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Judit Szepessy
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Two things I learned about Snapszer recently.

1. You can play a three player Snapszer as well. One difference between the four and three player Snapszer is that in the three player game you call only for colour as a trumpf not for a particular card in one colour. Another difference is that you remove the VII and VIII.
cards

2. In a four player Snapszer you can add your and your partner's points only after the trumpf has been played. Until then you keep your scores mentally and cannot check the cards. This gives the game another interesting twist.
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I have played this a few times and read all the threads but one thing I am confused about;

Do the marriages made before the close, count as pts after the deck is closed? Say my opponent has made a 40 pt marriage afterwards I close the deck and he gets to 66 first, but I insist that I should keep playing to see if I can get to 66..

So is the rule: the FIRST ONE to 66? or merely that the one who closes needs to get to 66?

If it's the latter case, then I can understand why some say that the marriages do not count, so that if you do it that way, the effect is that the closer can still get his chance to make 66...

Is the rule for different for 66 game? ie. that game played with 24 cards?

Great game, but very confusing on a couple of rules.
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lotus dweller
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sundaysilence wrote:


So is the rule: the FIRST ONE to 66? or merely that the one who closes needs to get to 66?
The rule is that the game ends when a player declares that they have reached 66 or more.

Whether they are correct or not, the (game) hand is over.

Edit: In Schnapsen scores are kept mentally - this adds considerably to the difficulty - although card counting is much easier with the small deck you also need to keep a running mental tally of your score and your opponent's score.
EDIT: This reply is based on the Pagat rules. There appear to be other rule sets.
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Peter Asimakis
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Marriages declared before the draw deck is closed still count towards that player's total, assuming as always that that player has won at least one trick. It doesn't matter who closes the deck.

Some play that marriages can no longer be declared once the deck is closed, others permit it. Just agree before you start. Perhaps this is the point causing your confusion?

As mentioned above the hand ends when a player declares he has 66 points. He wins the hand if he has 66 points, his opponent wins the hand if he has miscalculated and he doesn't have 66 points. One does not have the right to insist on continuing play if your opponent declares 66, rightly or wrongly.

Again, it doesn't matter who closes the deck, either player can declare he has 66 points. Usually a player who closes the deck does so because he is very confident of reaching 66, usually because he can "control" the hand with his trumps and other high ranking cards.(Remember one has to follow the suit led if possible and trump the card led if unable to follow the suit led if possible, once the deck is closed). If there is no declaration of 66 then the hand is played to conclusion with all tricks played. (Remember the last trick doesn't score 10 points if the deck has been closed). It is not common for the player who did not close the deck to declare 66, as it is much more likely his opponent has the cards to win the hand, as explained above.

Hope this is of some help.

Irini Pasi,

PLB
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Pierre Le Bear wrote:


Some play that marriages can no longer be declared once the deck is closed, others permit it. Just agree before you start. Perhaps this is the point causing your confusion?



Yes. More or less this is what is causing confusion. Some thread(s) said the points made for a marriage doesnt count for the non closing player, after the deck is closed. So he might have had 20 pts at one pt. in the game, but after the deck closed he no longer counts those.

This is nonsense. Yes?

Also another thread claimed that the player who closed merely has to REACH 66, not be the first. This seems obviously wrong, now in light of what you said.

So there are a couple of posts that are causing confusion yes.

Thanks for all your help. Both of you.

[edit] one more question:

If the hand is played to conclusion but nobody declares 66. what happens then? is it simply the most points wins?

Another post claimed that if the game is played to conclusion, whoever takes the last tricks wins. This wrong, yes?

Obviously there is some confusion out there. THanks
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lotus dweller
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sundaysilence wrote:


Yes. More or less this is what is causing confusion. Some thread(s) said the points made for a marriage doesnt count for the non closing player, after the deck is closed. So he might have had 20 pts at one pt. in the game, but after the deck closed he no longer counts those.

This is nonsense. Yes?
Once you have won points during a hand you don't lose them.

sundaysilence wrote:


Also another thread claimed that the player who closed merely has to REACH 66, not be the first. This seems obviously wrong, now in light of what you said.

First to correctly declare "66 (or more)" wins. An incorrect declaration can win if the loser does not ask for the hand to be recounted! A demonstrated incorrect declaration means a loss for the declaring player.

sundaysilence wrote:


If the hand is played to conclusion but nobody declares 66. what happens then? is it simply the most points wins?

Another post claimed that if the game is played to conclusion, whoever takes the last tricks wins. This wrong, yes?
If neither declare; then highest score wins.
Only if the hand is played to conclusion; 10 extra points for last trick.

EDIT: This reply is based on the Pagat rules. There appear to be other rule sets.
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Here is the thread that is causing all the problems:

http://boardgamegeek.com/article/5545773#5545773

Please see my post at the end of the thread which hopefully summarizes the confusion and we can clarify these confusing issues...
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lotus dweller
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Arrrrh - there seem to be variants of this game, all called Schnapsen - and the rules are different. The answers I have given above are consistent with the Pagat rules. And apparently at variance with Düsterwäldler's rules.

I suggest just pick a rule set that is common in your area and use that one. And if you go travelling in Germany or Austria be prepared to play with different rules.
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Peter Asimakis
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Pinook wrote:
sundaysilence wrote:


Yes. More or less this is what is causing confusion. Some thread(s) said the points made for a marriage doesnt count for the non closing player, after the deck is closed. So he might have had 20 pts at one pt. in the game, but after the deck closed he no longer counts those.

This is nonsense. Yes?
Once you have won points during a hand you don't lose them.

sundaysilence wrote:


Also another thread claimed that the player who closed merely has to REACH 66, not be the first. This seems obviously wrong, now in light of what you said.

First to correctly declare "66 (or more)" wins. An incorrect declaration can win if the loser does not ask for the hand to be recounted! A demonstrated incorrect declaration means a loss for the declaring player.

sundaysilence wrote:


If the hand is played to conclusion but nobody declares 66. what happens then? is it simply the most points wins?

Another post claimed that if the game is played to conclusion, whoever takes the last tricks wins. This wrong, yes?
If neither declare; then highest score wins.
Only if the hand is played to conclusion; 10 extra points for last trick.

EDIT: This reply is based on the Pagat rules. There appear to be other rule sets.




What Pinook said!

A card game is a living thing. The game evolves. Small differences in play between different groups are OK. The point is to have fun! The rules do lead to confusion because people interpret the written word differently. Perhaps one should use the word "melded" rather than "declared" when referring to marriages before and after closing the deck.
Enjoy.

PLB.
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sundaysilence wrote:
Some thread(s) said the points made for a marriage doesnt count for the non closing player, after the deck is closed. So he might have had 20 pts at one pt. in the game, but after the deck closed he no longer counts those.

This is nonsense. Yes?


As another replied, you do not lose points for a marriage just because the other player closed. The only situation in which you "lose" points is if you declared a marriage but never took a single trick. In that case, you don't get the points for the marriage and your opponent scores 3 game points for the deal rather than 2. (And this situation is independent of whether the deck is closed or not.)

sundaysilence wrote:
Also another thread claimed that the player who closed merely has to REACH 66, not be the first. This seems obviously wrong, now in light of what you said.


Yes, it's wrong. The player who closes must reach 66, and must be the first of the two players to reach 66. Otherwise, the closer's opponent wins the deal.

sundaysilence wrote:
If the hand is played to conclusion but nobody declares 66. what happens then? is it simply the most points wins?

Another post claimed that if the game is played to conclusion, whoever takes the last tricks wins. This wrong, yes?


This question is trickier and doesn't have a simple answer, because of variations in the rules that can be found. I assume you are asking about the situation where the deck is exhausted (rather than closed) and you play out all the cards in your hand. I have done a pretty thorough search of lots of rule sites, and here's my conclusion. In Schnapsen (the 5 card game), most authorities agree that the winner of the last trick wins the deal. In Sixty-Six (the 6 card game), most authorities agree that the winner of the last trick receives a bonus of 10 trick points, and then the player with the most trick points wins. (In this version, a tie at 65-65 is possible, but otherwise the player with the most trick points must have at least 66.)

I have recently tabulated my findings about all the rules variations I found around the world, both for Schnapsen and for Sixty-Six. You can find this discussion at http://psellos.com/schnapsen/rules-background.html . It includes, as one example, who says what about the bonus for taking the last trick.
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Peter Asimakis
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Martin,
Thanks for the link.
Hours of fun ahead!

Irini Pasi,

PLB.
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sunday silence
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thanks for all your new posts. Very good!
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Martin Tompa
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sundaysilence wrote:
thanks for all your new posts. Very good!


Don't miss two new Schnapsen forums that have just started: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/787366/variants-of-schna... and http://www.boardgamegeek.com/thread/787351/schnapsen-strateg... .
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Ronnie Dasgupta
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I have group that wants to learn to play Snapszer (for 4 players). We play 66 a lot. I have read the game instructions given here but I have some questions. First, what happens if any player declares 66 before the "called" trump card is played. If the leader (who anounced the trumps after seeing the three cards) declares 66 does his partner who had not yet played the trump card share the game winning points (6,3, 2,1). Second, what happens if the caller anounces Snapzer and loses a trick before the "called" trump card is played? I will be greatful is someone can clarify here.
 
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steve steve
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There's a book on Schnapsen that's just been released, "Winning Schnapsen".


http://www.amazon.com/Winning-Schnapsen-Basics-Expert-Strate...
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Martin Tompa
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heathensteve wrote:
There's a book on Schnapsen that's just been released, "Winning Schnapsen".


http://www.amazon.com/Winning-Schnapsen-Basics-Expert-Strate...


Thanks, Steve! More information is available at https://www.boardgamegeek.com/article/20788202
 
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wilky
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I was thought this game by my Austrian parents in law and my wife and they have never heard of the rule that you cannot preform a marriage after the deck is exhausted or closed. I wonder is this is mistake, lost in time rule from their side or just a different house rule.
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