Recommend
32 
 Thumb up
 Hide
6 Posts

Hibernia» Forums » Reviews

Subject: Hibernia: a review rss

Your Tags: Add tags
Popular Tags: [View All]
Yegor Sadoshenko
Ukraine
Dniepropetrovsk
Dniepropetrovsk region
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
This is my first review, so please, don't be too hard on me.

Hibernia is a 3-4 players area-control game set in ancient Ireland. At first glance it seems that the theme is a paste up, but when you start playing you understand that, even if it is a paste up, it fits perfectly. The board depicts Ireland (or Hibernia in Classic Latin), which is divided into 20 counties (5 in one of 4 colors). The differently-colored (bordered) counties are spread randomly over the land (so, if you choose, for example, green, that doesn’t mean that all green counties will be adjacent). In the beginning of the game players choose their color and put their respective-colored wooden cubes (warriors) into the main county (represented by a castle and situated in one of 4 ancient provinces of Ireland). Turn after turn players roll a specially devised die (instead of numbers or dots it has four colors - one for each of the county colors – as well as black and purple) and tries to gain control of other counties adjacent to theirs. At the end of each turn players score for the color of their counties. Around the edge of the board there is a scoring track consisting of variously colored blocks. Each colored block corresponds to a county of the same color. So if you have a county of the color of the block before you, you can move forward on the score track until you stumble on a block of such a color that you don’t have. The game ends when a player passes the score track. The player furthest along the track is the winner. In case of a tie, players get additional turns.

What is so special about Hibernia? First of all, it’s a self-produced game. For me this alone is a huge advantage. This is the second game by the designer Eric B. Vogel. His first game is Cambria (set in Wales). Sure, you would have liked to have better components, but when you think how much has been put into the game by the designer, you understand that sometimes quality could be moved a bit back.
Another advantage for me is that it’s a Celtic-themed game. I’m fond of Celts, of Irish Celts in particular, so it’s a pleasure to have yet another Celtic-themed game in my collection and to play it once in a while.
This is an area-control game. I don’t have many of these, so again it’s a good thing to play something different. I like the concept of the game (how it’s driven and played) and the scoring concept is sure something new, as, literally you don’t get scores at all.

I have only played Hibernia as a 2 player game. Our third player is too young (he’s not yet 6), but see more on him and the game below*. The game is designed for 3-4 players. Mostly for 4, I believe, with 3 in mind, meaning there is a 3 player version supplied in the rules. We used this variant for our 2 player games. Thus half of Ireland was occupied by neutral pieces and my wife and I struggled against them. Because of the unique scoring you can decide what counties to conquer next. This is especially useful at the end of the game. I may say, I like this game. Sure, with 2 players there is less tension, but it’s a quick game, that still makes you think hard of your moves.

But I want to recommend a certain addition to a 2 player game. Probably, it’s not needed in a 3-4-players games, but I found it useful in our 2 player games. In our games a player sometimes had up to 8 or so counties. These are a bit difficult to memorize when scoring. So we made the following thing: from my stocks I produced a set of wooden tokens of the colors needed: blue, red, yellow, green and purple (unfortunately, I only had 3 blue chips, so we substituted them with brown). These tokens we kept near the board. When somebody conquered a county, he would take a token of respective color from the “bank” (if the county was taken from another player, the corresponding token was taken from that player instead). While scoring we took the necessary tokens from our pile into hand, thus we could precisely see what was left. This really made the scoring easier.

Summary: This is a nice area-control game, which doesn’t take a lot of space nor time. It has interesting game mechanics and is sure to be liked by Celtic-oriented people. Probably, a board needs redesign. If the game doesn’t get played often, and the board is always in the box, then, when the game is brought out it will be some time before the board lies flat, or the players will have to use something heavy to press the board.

*My son was eagerly expecting the game when I told him that it would arrive. Even though he didn’t play it with us, he devised his own rules for the game and made me play with him. I must say, he has made a nice version of Hibernia. A couple of plays later he even introduced the neutrals actions (he explained that using computer games, where AI is present).
14 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Hank Panethiere
United States
St. Louis
Missouri
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
Good review and a good game that's overlooked.
3 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Yegor Sadoshenko
Ukraine
Dniepropetrovsk
Dniepropetrovsk region
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
metalchorus wrote:
Good review


Thank you.

metalchorus wrote:
and a good game that's overlooked.


This is a disadvantage for small games - most people don't look beyond TOP-100.

Yet there is an advantage of small games - they are good
5 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
sunday silence
United States
Maryland
flag msg tools
The scoring track seems to be quite novel but I cannot undestand from this review how it works. YOu say the person who passes the scoring track ends the game but the person furthest along is the winner... How does that work exactly? I would think the person who "passed the scoring track" would be furthest along but..?

Also not clear if you move along the track over counties you own or over specific counties that you control.
 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Yegor Sadoshenko
Ukraine
Dniepropetrovsk
Dniepropetrovsk region
flag msg tools
badge
Avatar
mbmbmbmbmb
sundaysilence wrote:
The scoring track seems to be quite novel but I cannot undestand from this review how it works. YOu say the person who passes the scoring track ends the game but the person furthest along is the winner... How does that work exactly? I would think the person who "passed the scoring track" would be furthest along but..?


Right, the furthest along wins. The player who passes the track "triggers" the game end. After that all the players (to the starting player) have one more turn. After that if there is a tie (a couple of players are at the same space), there's another turn. If no, the player furthest on the track wins. So, even if someone passes the track first, it doesn't mean that player would win. Other players could catch up with him and even get ahead of him.

sundaysilence wrote:
Also not clear if you move along the track over counties you own or over specific counties that you control.


The counties on the map are of 4 colours. The spaces on the track match these colours. So, if you, for example, own (or control, it doesn't matter) a blue, a yellow and a green county, you could move along the score track over 1 blue, 1 yellow and 1 green spaces in any order. If the space in front of you is of the colour that you don't have a county in, you stop (though a purple roll helps here).

Hope it helps.
2 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
sunday silence
United States
Maryland
flag msg tools
yes thank you for your comments...
1 
 Thumb up
 tip
 Hide
  • [+] Dice rolls
Front Page | Welcome | Contact | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Advertise | Support BGG | Feeds RSS
Geekdo, BoardGameGeek, the Geekdo logo, and the BoardGameGeek logo are trademarks of BoardGameGeek, LLC.