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Subject: Thoughts after nine hours of play rss

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Craig Groff-Folsom
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Seaside arrived around 4 PM yesterday, so we cracked it open, sorted it, and started dealing. When the final game was done, it was 1 AM and we had played 12 times. In my irresponsible days of yore when a 4 AM bedtime was the norm, I would've kept playing.

First, the components. No stamped metal coins? Turns out there's only 40, not 50. Though my set came with 20 Embargo tokens, and I haven't counted my Pirate Ship coins yet. Regardless, they are very cool. I also like the mats, if for no other reason than their art. For a game that's had questionable art direction in the past, they picked a good triptych to blow up for this purpose. We had one game with all three mat-cards, but we just set them aside until it became appropriate to use them (buying copies of those cards, for example).

It may also seem like a small thing, but the box is full-size for a reason. Drop your Treasure and Victory cards in, and you're set to play a full Seaside game while only transporting one box. If not, then you can fit the playmats in the lower right corner where the Victory cards and the Gold cards go.

Our first three games were 10 Seaside, 10 Seaside, and 6 Seaside/4 others. One of our players left and another arrived, so we re-started the trip through Seaside with 6 Seaside/4 others, and four more games of 5/5. After that, we tried out a few hand-picked combos.

Card-by-card thoughts:

Ambassador: True to form, it saw the most play (probably the only play) with Curses. One of my players was looking forward to giving out Masquerades, as he is in the minority in his play group in liking that card. Ambassador had a fun interaction with an empty Curse pile, as you're just handing your Curse(s) to the player(s) on your left.

Bazaar: I've seen the comparisons to Village, but I think a more apt comparison is Festival. Getting a card instead of a buy and an extra coin, in most decks, will mean getting to big money cards faster. This saw moderate use, but there were better ways to get extra actions in most games so it didn't really shine.

Caravan: I found this card to be extremely good. +1 card and +1 action make it "free" the turn you play it, and stringing a couple together could get you a 7 or 8 card hand to start your next turn. It definitely was one my favorite Durations.

Cutpurse: I hated this card when I first saw it, but someone bought it early in the game and terrorized everyone else. When two people get on board the Cutpurse strategy, it can be mayhem for those left in its wake. Early, it's a much more precise and targeted Militia. Late, it seems like people don't have Copper (or aren't harmed as much by losing one), but Militia tends to run into more VP cards by then as well, so Cutpurse doesn't lose any relative efficiency.

Embargo: I think I'm in love. Seriously, this is an amazing card. This is the game-changer that separates the Dominion-playing metaphorical wheat from the chaff. I sat in an absolute grinder of a game, with an Embargo on Estates, three Embargoes on Duchies, and Three on Provinces. Myself and the man responsible for those Embargoes knew that Ironworks were going to become the key to victory, but the other two players became so flustered by the illusion of a lack of VP that they were buying Salvager in a theoretical maneuver to trash the Curses they had started to accumulate. Later, in a two-player game, I managed to freeze out the Treasure Map strategy (more on that later) with a couple well-timed Embargoes. It forces people to look elsewhere, for less obvious strategies, or play penalized.
Top three awesome places I saw an Embargo played:
3) Estates. Go big or go home.
2) Embargoes. The counter-countermove.
1) Silvers. Buy it in your first two turns, and watch people try to comprehend how they're going to ramp up their money.

Explorer: Feels like a Baron ("reveal X. If not, gain Y."), but drives like an Adventurer. If any card in Seaside could've cost 6, this is it. It nets you a Silver, IN HAND, every time you play it. Draw 4 coin and an Explorer? Grab a Silver and buy a Gold. Your explorer just gained you 5 coin in a single turn. Can Gold gain you 6 coin in a single turn? Not without +1 buy, it can't. Big money strategy loves this card.

Fishing Village: Action-heavy players will be all over this card. +1 coin now and on your next turn is pretty good, especially for 3, but I found myself disappointed more often than not when holding one of these. It's a Village variation, so I'm sure I know a few people that will invest heavily and have three or more out on the board while comboing with some drawing power (this and Smithy could make for a fun 3/4 opening).

Ghost Ship: This would have seen more play at 4 cost. Whenever it came out, it was always paired with a more attractive attack card, a more attractive 5 cost action, or both. Once someone begins using it, I think people will gain some respect. For now, it's just sitting in the corner while people point and laugh.

Haven: This card plays a lot deeper than I expected. Hide a card for next turn, how hard could that be? Well, if you're about to draw into 7 coin, put away a Silver and buy for 5 this turn (or a Copper and buy 6). Too many actions in hand? Take your pick of what will benefit you. With the top of the deck not always equaling "next turn" (thanks to draw actions and opponents' attack cards), setting a card aside to truly use next turn is handy. I also caught myself "overpaying" for Haven a lot, buying it when I had 3 or 4 coin in my hand just because I felt my deck needed a copy. It would be an inferior card with a higher cost, but it's worth buying in some situations when you have that much coin in your hand.

Island: Being one of the first spoilers, everyone I knew had discussed this card and compared it to Great Hall. What's not to like? VP/Action hybrid, and it gets out of the way when you play it. 4 cost and the lack of +1 action seemed to slow this card down, but it was still handy. Debate raged over whether it was good for removing Estates early or Provinces late, but it was often a moot topic; without an attack card to Swindle or Saboteur, one was as good as the other. In fact, in games with Explorer, it's better to keep the Provinces in your deck and remove the non-Province VP cards. After that epiphany, I was much more interested in using my higher opening buy to invest in one and thin my deck at the start of the game.

Lighthouse: Attack protection that's not in your hand? Brilliant! The +1 coin (twice) is good, and the +1 action immediately meant that you didn't have to waste your action play for the turn. Again, this was a card that saw a lot of "overpayed" purchasing, particularly in attack-heavy games. I'd daresay I saw people with 3 or 4 coin reaching for this more than I've seen them reach for Moat or Secret Chamber in similar situations.

Lookout: The "must trash" part of this card makes it a slight risk, one that I'm not entirely sold on just yet. I found it to be a fun way to rid my deck of Copper early, but as the game went on it just got riskier and the payoff was less rewarding. Good early card if you're working on deck sculpting, but it won't protect you adequately from Curses like prior trash cards (Chapel, Steward, Trading Post) will.

Merchant Ship: In games where people invested in it, the Merchant Ship paid some nice dividends. Combos with Lighthouse and Fishing Village were common occurrences. Other games saw it play an inferior role to Wharf or other 5 cost actions.

Native Village: Let me introduce this set's Pawn: novices will become enamored with putting a card on the mat, so much so that they will do it blindly turn after turn, pausing incrementally to add all the mat cards to their hand and giving them... well, nothing. If they get three or four VP cards out of their deck, invariably they'll keep playing Native Village and end up with a Silver out there, so they'll feel compelled to pull the whole stack back in. I used it in a lucky situation where I had one in hand after each of four Sea Hags. It's good for setting up Treasure Map, Outpost, Tactician, or any other situation where storing and then drawing a ton of cards would be nice. +2 actions will make it see play in action-starved games, because +2 action for 2 cost is good all by itself. Just enjoy watching the novices get distracted by the shiny mechanics.

Navigator: Used sparingly yesterday, I think he wasn't as flashy as some of the new mechanics and as such hasn't earned much respect yet. His +2 coin at 4 cost makes him as good as a worst-case scenario Militia, and the ability to see your next hand can help set up Treasure Map or avoid a bad clump of VP cards (and possibly Curses). A solid card regardless.

Outpost: This takes runner-up in the flashy mechanic department. Novices latch onto taking an extra turn, then draw three cards, frown, and buy a Copper. Smart players set up with Caravan, Haven, Lighthouse, Fishing Village, Wharf (plus action help), or even Navigator (again, plus action help). A three-card hand can still work if you've got the right add-ons.

Pearl Diver: A fun, cute card that lets you draw from the bottom of your deck. Well, not exactly, but if you chain it you can. By itself, it's an alright card. With multiple copies, you can increase the quality of your card draws in a unique way. In games where coin is hard to come by, I could see this being useful. Otherwise, buying a 2 cost action like this is likely overshadowed by a better, higher-cost card.

Pirate Ship: My own personal charity case, I set out to prove this card's usefulness. Obviously it gets compared to Thief, and not adding all those coin (particularly in a 4-player game) is viewed as an initial drawback. However, investing heavily in Pirate Ship early and getting it played often before decks get bulky and full of actions is the key to making this strategy work. I played three games using this strategy, and had 4-6 coin on the Ship each time. Turn after turn, I'd say "Ship and 2 (or 3, or 4), Province, go." The early game investment of time ALWAYS paid off.

Salvager: A fun new Upgrade/Remodel, players welcomed the ability to add coin to the cost of their card. New players always ask about "gain a card costing up to X" and why they can't add some from their hand to buy something bigger. Salvager finally lets that work. Plus, the +1 buy doesn't take away your buy phase, so you're free to work with the Salvager and still buy a card later in your turn. This makes it possible to "downgrade", that is trade a high-value card in for two lower value cards as well; not sure if that's a strategy that will see a lot of use just yet, but it's interesting to note in case it comes in handy in the future...

Sea Hag: Even without the gaining of a Curse, the discard of the top card stung at times. Making Curses directly available at 4 (as opposed to indirectly available via Ambassador and Swindler at 3) creates a more urgent response as 4 cost is a much more common buy in the opening two turns.

Smugglers: I think this led to two really interesting situations that I'd never seen before:
1) Six of them were played on consecutive turns once someone bought a 5 cost card. The same card was gained each time. With Smugglers in play, being the first person to buy a high cost card (or even just buying a Silver) will reward your opponents if they've bought this 3 cost "Workshop for a new era".
2) Mid- to late-game, one of our players could buy Provinces if he drew the right hand (50% of the time, probably). If he didn't draw that hand, he chose not to buy anything. Strong strategy, and definitely a first in Dominion games that I've seen. Why give your opponent a free Silver, or Duchy? Smugglers makes for a much more cerebral game.

Tactician: Much like Outpost, if you set it up well, you can have a monster result from this card. People were very excited when the spoiler went up, but once we actually got to play with it, the excitement was gone. It often didn't have complimentary cards (+coin, +action actions), and the other 5 cost cards gave a more immediate reward. I see Tactician as being a situational trick for some games, but not nearly as awesome as initially discussed around here.

Treasure Map: ...or, the card that almost broke the game, according to my group. The gain of 4 Gold is without a doubt the biggest gain that one can get without severely hard work and a lot of card drawing. In 3- and 4-player games, the 2 or 3 people to complete the map often found themselves miles ahead of the 1 or 2 that couldn't draw the right combo. When I mentioned and demonstrated the Treasure Map/Chapel opening, some people were convinced that this one card could ruin Dominion forever.
After running it through some strenuous (and admittedly unkind) testing, we decided that there were enough factors in place to prevent it from dominating any given scene. There are sets of 10 kingdoms where you simply won't get the right cards. There are sets where attack cards (or Embargoes) will prevent the deck's efficiency. There are even hands where you simply can't draw 4 coin to buy the second Treasure Map!
The verdict: being aware of the viability of the big money jump Treasure Map strategy is key when the Map is on the table. Trash cards undoubtedly help, but Embargoes and attacks can slow down or even entirely derail the Map's fast track to Gold.

Treasury: Are you kidding me? If Embargo wasn't in this set, I'd be even more enamored with this card. A free +1 coin that keeps coming back until you buy VPs is a no-brainer investment, even at 5 cost. Stack your deck high with money or +1 card +1 action actions, then let all the Treasuries fly and grab yourself a Province. I saw it paired with a Conspirator for maximum ridiculousness.

Warehouse: Not too shabby of a card. I didn't get into it (perhaps because I always felt there was a better 3 cost available), but some people managed to find a lot of use in this new and improved Cellar. Moving past the VPs (and ever-present Curses) and getting to the good stuff is crucial in Dominion, and doing it three cards at a time is a fair pace.

Wharf: There's not much to say about this card. +2 cards now and next turn is well worth the 5 cost, and the +1 buy is icing on the cake. As mentioned above, I watched it combo well with other Duration cards to set up big turns.

Overall, Seaside adds so many options to an already fun game. If the base game often goes to Province grab, and Intrigue goes to a three-pile ending, Seaside takes both of those options and asks players to adapt based on what's available. Big money gained some tools to go faster; action-chains picked up some great new tricks; Curses have become more common and slightly less painful (but still an annoyance, to be sure). Now more than ever, the diverse kingdom selection will separate the analytical Dominion players from the smash-mouth stubborn players that will try to shoehorn their favorite strategy into every game. The investment of some slightly more complex cards is well worth the result of a richer, more nuanced game.
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1603-1714
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Excellent review of the cards! Thanks for taking the time to give us your thoughts. I am a bit jealous that I haven't got to try the game out yet, but I will soon.
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Ben Ford
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Dave41fan wrote:
Sea Hag: Even without the gaining of a Curse, the discard of the top card stung at times. Making Curses directly available at 4 (as opposed to indirectly available via Ambassador and Swindler at 3) creates a more urgent response as 4 cost is a much more common buy in the opening two turns.

Discarding the top card doesn't actually hurt except psychologically. It is only there to prevent multiple Sea Hags played in one turn cycle from being crippling. It would be really bad if your opponents combined to play 5 Sea Hags and then your next 5 draws were all Curse cards put on top.
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Remy Gibson
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Excellent overview! The only downside is that your comments make me wish I could also play 12 games in a row...
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Craig Groff-Folsom
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benford wrote:
Discarding the top card doesn't actually hurt except psychologically. It is only there to prevent multiple Sea Hags played in one turn cycle from being crippling. It would be really bad if your opponents combined to play 5 Sea Hags and then your next 5 draws were all Curse cards put on top.


Well, if you wanted to draw that card... I would classify that as hurting. Thieves can hurt by discarding action cards that you would've otherwise drawn. Tribute can hurt depending on what it hits too.
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Tim Kieritz
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benford wrote:

Discarding the top card doesn't actually hurt except psychologically. It is only there to prevent multiple Sea Hags played in one turn cycle from being crippling. It would be really bad if your opponents combined to play 5 Sea Hags and then your next 5 draws were all Curse cards put on top.

The second Sea Hag discards the curse and put on top a new one.
And after 5 Sea Hags only your top card is a curse.
 
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Chris Ferejohn
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Dave41fan wrote:
benford wrote:
Discarding the top card doesn't actually hurt except psychologically. It is only there to prevent multiple Sea Hags played in one turn cycle from being crippling. It would be really bad if your opponents combined to play 5 Sea Hags and then your next 5 draws were all Curse cards put on top.


Well, if you wanted to draw that card... I would classify that as hurting. Thieves can hurt by discarding action cards that you would've otherwise drawn. Tribute can hurt depending on what it hits too.


Yeah, but that's all totally results-based. In general, cycling through your deck quickly is good, since if you know what you are doing your deck should get stronger after every cycle (unless you are seriously getting whalloped by curses).
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Ron Laufer
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Dave41fan wrote:

Smugglers: ...
2) Mid- to late-game, one of our players could buy Provinces if he drew the right hand (50% of the time, probably). If he didn't draw that hand, he chose not to buy anything. Strong strategy, and definitely a first in Dominion games that I've seen. Why give your opponent a free Silver, or Duchy? Smugglers makes for a much more cerebral game.
Not sure I agree with this tactic. You can't guarantee your left neighbor has the smuggler in hand, and even so, how does it hurt you if they copy you?

If you buy a duchy and everyone else gets one, big deal, it's a wash (barring any dukes). If you buy a duchy and your left neighbor doesn't have the smuggler in hand, you're ahead. I don't see a reason that not buying for fear of someone getting the same thing you got is a good idea.
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Dave41fan wrote:

If you buy a duchy and everyone else gets one, big deal, it's a wash (barring any dukes). If you buy a duchy and your left neighbor doesn't have the smuggler in hand, you're ahead. I don't see a reason that not buying for fear of someone getting the same thing you got is a good idea.


If you buy a duchy and someone else plays a Smugglers, they gain a Duchy, but still have their normal buy to buy something else. They essentially gain a free card and still get to continue their turn. This also says nothing about a game where the player to your left may be able to play multiple Smugglers. My point: it certainly isn't just a wash.
 
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Craig Groff-Folsom
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gonzoron wrote:
Not sure I agree with this tactic. You can't guarantee your left neighbor has the smuggler in hand, and even so, how does it hurt you if they copy you?

If you buy a duchy and everyone else gets one, big deal, it's a wash (barring any dukes). If you buy a duchy and your left neighbor doesn't have the smuggler in hand, you're ahead. I don't see a reason that not buying for fear of someone getting the same thing you got is a good idea.


If you buy a Duchy, then your opponent Smuggles for a Duchy *AND* buys a Duchy with his own coin, he's gained a Province (point-wise) for 5 coin.

If you're ahead in the money game, and you feel confident that you can out-buy your opponent in the Province race, why risk giving him points? Of course, this is all situational... but in the situation where I observed it happening, it ended up working out in his favor.
 
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Joshua Reubens
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Yes, but the draws are random... sure it sucks when its a good card but it could also be a bad card.
 
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Ron Laufer
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Dave41fan wrote:
If you buy a Duchy, then your opponent Smuggles for a Duchy *AND* buys a Duchy with his own coin, he's gained a Province (point-wise) for 5 coin.
Yes, and now (assuming for the moment you were tied before your turn) he's 3 points ahead of you. If you hadn't bought a duchy, he'd have just bought one of his own and be...... 3 points ahead of you. Your duchy and his duchy cancel out.

But you've just made him blow an action to do so. If you didn't buy anything, he could have used that action for something else, and maybe ended up with a province instead putting him 6 points ahead of you.

My point is: Absolute points don't matter. What matters is your relative points to everyone else. Even if you KNOW the player to your left has a smuggler and can buy a duchy, if the player to HIS left doesn't, it's still a good move to buy the duchy. (If you do, you go up 3, he goes up 6 and the other players don't go up at all. If you don't, he goes up 3 and no one else does.)


I hadn't considered the multiple smuggler issue though. If the player to your left has enough smugglers and +2 action cards that he stands a reasonable chance of double- or triple-smuggling, THEN I agree, not buying is a good option.

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Tim Ford
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I think Smuggler is a better card the better your play group is.

If everyone is making the optimal play on their turn (and it doesn't happen to be a province) then the smuggler gives you their optimal play + whatever else you can do.

I can see that knowing your opponents have smugglers can definitely swing your decision on whether buying a 5 cost card that enhances an already-solid combo is worth it, if you got some good early buy power on then you might want to just let your deck play and not give potential advantage to your opponents.

Keeping track of how many smugglers they have bought + played (they may be sitting in their discard stack waiting on shuffling) could be important on a choice for buying an additional gold or powerful action or nulling your turn. I really don't want to buy one gold and watch him chain off with villages and multiple smugglers
 
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Craig Groff-Folsom
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gonzoron wrote:
Dave41fan wrote:
If you buy a Duchy, then your opponent Smuggles for a Duchy *AND* buys a Duchy with his own coin, he's gained a Province (point-wise) for 5 coin.
Yes, and now (assuming for the moment you were tied before your turn) he's 3 points ahead of you. If you hadn't bought a duchy, he'd have just bought one of his own and be...... 3 points ahead of you. Your duchy and his duchy cancel out.

But you've just made him blow an action to do so. If you didn't buy anything, he could have used that action for something else, and maybe ended up with a province instead putting him 6 points ahead of you.


I'd rather my opponent buy a Duchy, putting him up 3, than him gain two to my one. If I don't buy a Duchy, and he buys one, then there are two more in the pile than there would be otherwise. This gives me more time to implement my strategy, which is to buy the unsmugglable Provinces.

Between Sea Hag, Ambassador, and Embargo, I saw more Curses yesterday than I think I ever have in a single day of playing Dominion. Add that to Witch, Torturer, and Swindler, and I bet that pile will be emptying a lot more often. Empty Curses and one "hot" action leaves one pile to empty before the game ends. I'd prefer it not be Duchies while my opponent out-gains me for free.
 
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Jeff Wolfe
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Dave41fan wrote:
gonzoron wrote:
Dave41fan wrote:
If you buy a Duchy, then your opponent Smuggles for a Duchy *AND* buys a Duchy with his own coin, he's gained a Province (point-wise) for 5 coin.
Yes, and now (assuming for the moment you were tied before your turn) he's 3 points ahead of you. If you hadn't bought a duchy, he'd have just bought one of his own and be...... 3 points ahead of you. Your duchy and his duchy cancel out.

But you've just made him blow an action to do so. If you didn't buy anything, he could have used that action for something else, and maybe ended up with a province instead putting him 6 points ahead of you.


I'd rather my opponent buy a Duchy, putting him up 3, than him gain two to my one. If I don't buy a Duchy, and he buys one, then there are two more in the pile than there would be otherwise. This gives me more time to implement my strategy, which is to buy the unsmugglable Provinces.

Between Sea Hag, Ambassador, and Embargo, I saw more Curses yesterday than I think I ever have in a single day of playing Dominion. Add that to Witch, Torturer, and Swindler, and I bet that pile will be emptying a lot more often. Empty Curses and one "hot" action leaves one pile to empty before the game ends. I'd prefer it not be Duchies while my opponent out-gains me for free.


With more than two players, unless all your opponents have Smugglers in their hands, you are bypassing the opportunity to gain an advantage over somebody else.
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Philip Thomas
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thaos52002 wrote:

Yes, but the draws are random... sure it sucks when its a good card but it could also be a bad card.


It can't be worse than Curse though. Having that Curse as the next card you draw is painful.
 
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Bryan Rankin
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Quote:
Discarding the top card doesn't actually hurt except psychologically. It is only there to prevent multiple Sea Hags played in one turn cycle from being crippling. It would be really bad if your opponents combined to play 5 Sea Hags and then your next 5 draws were all Curse cards put on top.


It really hurts if you just put down your two best cards due to the ghost ship.
 
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István Madarász
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Cool review.

In case somebody is looking for the cards, here they are:
part one
part two
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Byron Leung
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Navigator: Used sparingly yesterday, I think he wasn't as flashy as some of the new mechanics and as such hasn't earned much respect yet. His +2 coin at 4 cost makes him as good as a worst-case scenario Militia, and the ability to see your next hand can help set up Treasure Map or avoid a bad clump of VP cards (and possibly Curses). A solid card regardless.



I just want to point out that you compared the card to the wrong card.
It is actually the new Chancellor. You play it and you have you cycle your cards more aggresively so that you better cards will come sooner.
But still, i would question the 5 cards vs the whole deck and cost an extra coin : (
 
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Ted Vessenes
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theatog wrote:
I just want to point out that you compared the card to the wrong card.
It is actually the new Chancellor. You play it and you have you cycle your cards more aggresively so that you better cards will come sooner.
But still, i would question the 5 cards vs the whole deck and cost an extra coin : (


I was thinking about that fact this morning. I like the Chancellor and hate the Navigator. And when they are in your deck, I feel like the Navigator clearly has the stronger ability (justifying the higher cost). I also feel like Navigator is more playable at 4 than Chancellor is at 3.

If you've been following along at home, you'll note some real logical inconsistencies in my emotions there.

I think you should almost always discard the top 5 with Navigator. The best explanation I can think of for why it might be better than Chancellor isn't that it gives you the option to discard. (You nearly always want to do that.) It's that playing the card can trigger an additional deck shuffle. If there are 3 cards left in your deck, Chancellor isn't that hot. But playing the Navigator will immediately force a reshuffle, plus you can get 5 cards deeper on the next shuffle by discarding the top 5. I haven't run the numbers, but I think that for a well trimmed deck, the Navigator has slightly faster deck throughput than the Chancellor.

Throughput is also the reason Lookout feels like a completely over the top card to me. I love having two of these in my deck, and even in the endgame, it's generally worth playing to get Silver out of your deck.
 
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Alex N
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deathhq wrote:
I think Smuggler is a better card the better your play group is.

If everyone is making the optimal play on their turn (and it doesn't happen to be a province) then the smuggler gives you their optimal play + whatever else you can do.


But their optimal play may be hindered by your own previous plays of various attack cards. They might have Curses in their hands, or have their hand screwed in other ways. Or their strategy just got Embargo'd and they are in a transitional period where they are switching to some other plan by buying a card that your deck doesn't really benefit from.

Their play may be optimal but you won't necessarily want what they buy. So I guess the lesson here is that Smugglers become stronger in setups with few attack cards (or with Moat/Lighthouse).
 
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Matt Olson
Australia
Darlington
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In our limited experience, the Pirate Ship was more game warping than Treasure Map in 4 player games. It may have just been the luck of the draws and the configuration of cards, but Pirate Ship with 5-8 coins on it is crazy. At first I thought 8 coins was too greedy and would be inefficient (wasting a potential 'buy' turn to go from 6 to 8 coins), until my wife did it and slaughtered us - Village, Pirate Ship, Pirate Ship = bomb.

Treasure Map is more situational; in games with little means of trashing it seems to play inefficiently compared to the Pirate Ship. In games with cards like Chapel and Remodel, the thieving ability of Pirate Ship can cripple streamlined decks.

I have to play with them more, but right now we revere the Pirate Ship over the Treasure Map.
 
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Alex N
United States
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Are you sure you're playing Pirate Ship correctly? Sounds like you might be using it to get a gold coin on the mat for every Treasure card removed in a turn. You should be getting at most 1 gold coin as long as you've removed at least one Treasure card.
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