Kirk Allton
United States
Lewis Center
Ohio
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Nights of Fire is a game that recreates the vicious surface battles around Guadalcanal and the later Solomons Campaign in WW2. I will try to give an idea of how the game plays.

RULES
The rules consist of eight pages plus several charts further breaking down how the different aspects of the game plays. For instance, the original rules give an overview of how firing works, but you have to locate the chart that shows the ranges of each ship. A little fiddly, but the rules are simple and intuitive.

COMBAT
Each ship has a Main Battery (MB) rating which is 2 numbers. The first is the firepower rating (from 1-10) and the second is the armor piercing rating. When a ship fires, the FP rating is added to a single six sided die roll. The defending ship then rolls a die and adds the DEF rating to the roll. The AP rating of the firing ship is then compared to the armor rating of the defending ship. If the AP rating is higher nothing is done. If the AP value is less, then that difference is subtracted from the firing ship's roll. Also, the size of the target ship is subtracted from the firing roll. If the firing ships modified roll is greater than the target ships firing roll, that is the number of hits inflicted on that ship. You then roll for each hit to see the amount of damage done. This is fast, intuitive, and produces realistic results. Ships take either structural or flotation hits, and when one of these equal 4 damage points, the ship goes down.
Each ship also is given a TT (torpedo tube) rating. An X means none, while ships with torpedoes have 3 ratings showing the number of mounts, torps in each mount, and the base damage rating of each torpedo. Torpedoes are counted individually as mounts fire them, and if one hits its base damage factor is then added to a die roll with the defending ship again rolling a die and adding its defense factor. The size and speed of the ship factor into how many torpedoes hit it. Again, fun and realistic results.

SCENARIOS
The game comes with 13 historical scenarios. Also in the game is a campaign game in which each turn is a month long. Initial forces are delegated to each side as the campaign starts on Aug, 1942. Reinforcement ships are listed as they become available.
Each month, you roll to see if a mission is assigned for that month. You then roll for each mission to see its type (JP bombardment, USN transport, etc) and then roll to see how many of each ship type is available for that mission. You then select that number of ships from your available pool of ships and assign them to the mission. Inteligence is rolled for each opposing player with the results ranging from nothing learned to the player knowing the exact composition of each force. This also affects spotting during the mission, as each turn you roll to see if an enemy division is spotted by you to be fired at. Again, simple and fun.

THE PIECES
Unit cards are individual ships, and are printed in color. Each card has a nice profile of the ship, with the ship class shown at top.
The battle map is a range of "bands" numbering 1-10. The JP player starts at 10 in the campaign, while US ships start at 1. Spotting is 6 bands max, while the big boys (BBs and BCs) can reach out five bands. Modifiers are thrown in for firing that far.
Islands are provided and are placed randomly in the campaign game, or a scenario will specify where to place them. Islands affect spotting with radar.

All in all, this is a very good game for WW2 enthusiasts.
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Barton Campbell
United States
Jersey City
New Jersey
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Though it's not clearly pointed out, I think this is a card game.
 
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Kirk Allton
United States
Lewis Center
Ohio
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bartman347 wrote:
Though it's not clearly pointed out, I think this is a card game.
Yes, I am going to get some pics up as soon as I can. This is a boardgame where the ships are represented by cards, but it is not a game where cards are drawn to form a hand such as Attack Sub or Down in Flames. Actual movement and range between ships is done with Division markers placed on the bands on the battle board, and the ship cards placed next to the board showing the composition of the divisions. If you search for NWS on this site you will see the WW2 game by the company. The cards shown there (and the NWS WW1 game) are what the cards in this game look like, except more colorful. There is a difference between those games and this one, however, in that this game uses the "bands" for combat and movement, and the resolution of combat is SLIGHTLY different.

I should have also noted that there is basically an "AI" sheet if you play this game solitaire. Basically, the sheet controls how the enemy ship moves and how they fire at your ships. It works well, and is a very nice feature so that the scenarios and campaign can be played solitaire.
 
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M St
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Nappy wrote:
The battle map is a range of "bands" numbering 1-10. The JP player starts at 10 in the campaign, while US ships start at 1. Spotting is 6 bands max, while the big boys (BBs and BCs) can reach out five bands. Modifiers are thrown in for firing that far.
By "reach out out" you mean maximum fire range? That would be odd since virtually all the Solomons battles (typically taking place at night, as I presume most of the 13 scenarios are) were fought at essentially point blank range for these ships. Even cruisers could fire effectively several times as far as the typical spotting range, if they just saw the target.
 
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Kirk Allton
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Lewis Center
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M St wrote:
Nappy wrote:
The battle map is a range of "bands" numbering 1-10. The JP player starts at 10 in the campaign, while US ships start at 1. Spotting is 6 bands max, while the big boys (BBs and BCs) can reach out five bands. Modifiers are thrown in for firing that far.
By "reach out out" you mean maximum fire range? That would be odd since virtually all the Solomons battles (typically taking place at night, as I presume most of the 13 scenarios are) were fought at essentially point blank range for these ships. Even cruisers could fire effectively several times as far as the typical spotting range, if they just saw the target.
Very good point. All of the historical scenarios occur at night, daylight can occur during the campaign game. Although the BBs and BCs can fire 6 bands, they have to spot enemy divisions first. The way detection (spotting) is resolved is you roll a six sided dice for each enemy division. On a roll of 1 or less, no spotting and it is possible you have a mistaken target and fire on your own ships in another division if present. A "2" is not detected. A 3-4 is detected, and a 5+ is detected and idetified (in the campaign game, enemy ships are inverted and placed under a division counter so the other side does not know the composition of a division until it fires or a 5+ is rolled. Modifiers to the detection roll at 6 bands is -1 for range, -3 for night, commanders rating (either a +1, 0, or -1 depending on who it is), and +1 if the division was spotted last turn. Obviously, spotting a division at night at 6 bands is impossible unless you have a good commander, or the division was spotted at 5 bands and is leaving, or both. And then, it is not good odds. As range decreases, the mods get better on detection, and radar helps if the enemy division is in range. Hope this helps.
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Christopher Dean Naval Warfare Simulations / Tactical Warfare Simulations (Land/Air Combat)
United States
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Hi, I am Christopher Dean, co-designer of NOF and director of operations at Naval Warfare Simulations.

NOF was inspired by VG Tokyo Express but we used our own original combat system that was designed for Naval Warfare WW1/WW2 - with some added detail such as commander ratings, rain squalls, floatation damage, etc.

NOF is, however, NOT a card game. The only purpose of the data "cards" in the game is to display the ship data and for marking damage. This makes referencing the ship data and ship recognition far easier then stuffing the same detail into a counter sized space.

NOF gives hard hitting realistic and rapid fire combat resolution on the size of a small TV tray table where you can fight out a single battle or an entire dynamic campaign. Day, dusk, dawn, and night battles are all possible - or if you prefer, they can all be night battles.

Detection via radar and optics is a critical part of the design and commander ratings effect cohesion, detection, and combat. Ships have main battery, secondary battery, tertiary battery, and torpedo battery ratings if any are available.

Let me know if this information helps any. Side note, we plan on professional printed editions of this game very soon and can take special requests for printing as needed. Thanks.

Here is the website for the game;
http://forums.navalwarfare.org/showthread.php?t=32


Christopher Dean
Naval Warfare Simulations
Director of Operations
http://www.navalwarfare.net




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YINAN BAO
China
Shanghai
Shanghai
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I found the info of this game by chance but I don't know where to order a printed copy of the game? On the NWS website (a forum) I only see the downloaded pdf version, so I assume as of now (Jan 2015) there is no 'professional printed edition?' The photos here show someone DIY...This is really a nice game after I saw the sample but I really want to buy a printed game not a pdf and I think I am not able (or simply cannot afford) to print all these game elements in colour...
 
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NWS Wargaming Store
United States
Orlando
Florida
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A print on demand option is now available on my store.

Thanks
Christopher Dean
NWS
 
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