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Introducing Quebec 1759



There's lots of good reasons to strongly recommend Quebec 1759, but I'll start by just mentioning just two of them:
1. First of all, Quebec 1759 is widely regarded as one of the best block war games for beginners. It even has a proven track record as such - it has been in print ever since it was first published in 1972, and it received a fresh overhaul as recently as 2009. It's this new edition that is the subject of this review, and if you're looking for a simple block war game to start with, this might just be it. It's tried and tested without being old and stale. Despite being the very first block war game developed (borrowing the fog-of-war concept from Stratego blocks), it remains one of Columbia Games' flagship games, and can still compete quite strongly with the newer games being produced in the genre. In other words, it's good not just by virtue of its place in the history of game design, but it's good simply because it's an excellent game in its own right, even by today's standards.
2. Secondly, Quebec 1759 has enormous historical flavour. The Battle of Quebec is commonly regarded as one of the most significant battles of history, because it turned the tide of the war in North America against the French and towards the British. The impact of this particular military victory for determining the course and future of history in North America cannot be underestimated. This great block war game brings this delightful historical flavour and detail to the game table.



I'll concede that I've long been a sceptic of war games in general. But I have a ten year old son who loves Stratego because of the placement of units, bluffing, fog of war, and direct conflict. We quickly discovered that Quebec 1759 has all that and more, including dice rolling for combat, and rich historical detail. Already after our first play, we were just loving Quebec 1759, and ready to let our copy of Stratego collect dust, and our next couple of plays only confirmed that further and increased our appreciation for this tried and tested jewel. Read this review to find out more about the revised edition of this gem, and how to play!





COMPONENTS

Game box

The game comes in a sturdy cardboard box that's protected and dressed in a colourful thin card sleeve:



The back of the box gives a short overview of what the game is about:



Here we learn this about the game: "Quebec 1759 is a unique strategy game depicting the historic campaign and battle between French and British forces for control of North America. The game is played on a colorful mapboard with counters which represent the actual regiments, militia, indians, and naval forces that served in the campaign. If strategic cunning is your forte, Quebec 1759 gives you the chance to restage this dramatic event and influence its outcome. the game is historically accurate, and usually ends with a decisive Battle of the Plains of Abraham, as did the actual campaign. The British won the historical event; in this simulation, the French player can reverse the result of that fateful summer of 1759." All I can say is "Amen to that!" That's an excellent overview of the game, and the best part is that you can set up the game in 5 minutes and play in under an hour. The game system is simple and elegant, easy enough for a Stratego loving ten year old to quickly become a new convert! Let's find out more!

Component list

Here's what you get inside the box:
● map of Quebec area
● 52 wooden blocks
● sticker sheet
● 4 dice
● rules



Rule book

This game has been out since 1972, but the rules have undergone several revisions since then. The most major revision was in 2009, coinciding with the 250th anniversary of the actual battle. The current set of rules is version 2.0. You can download them here: http://www.columbiagames.com/resources/3001/quebec1759rules....



Of the eight pages, only four pages contain the actual rules for the game. There's also two pages with some excellent historical commentary about the events behind the game, and the remaining space on the other pages is filled with maps and pictures. There were still quite a few details to absorb and wrap my head around, but learning the rules wasn't really too painful a process. Certainly it was easy enough to teach the game to my ten year old once I had it figured out. If you're an average euro-gamer inexperienced with block war games, there are a few concepts that will take a bit of getting used to, but I'd certainly regard this rule-set as fairly accessible. It's not Stratego, but it's a long way from being a complicated war game. My only previous experience with a block war game was Richard III, and the rules of Quebec 1759 are certainly quite a bit easier, and there is much less to remember.

Map

The "board" of Quebec 1759 is a detailed map of the area around the city of Quebec. It is made out of thin card, and folds into quarters. There are two separate river areas, called "St Laurent" on the left and "Bason" on the right (separated by a dashed line), which will be used for amphibious movement of troops.



Units will be placed in one of ten zones marked in red letters (Montmorency, Beauport, St. Charles, Abraham, Ste. Foy, Cap Rouge, Sillery, Etchemin, Levis, and Ile d'Orleans), which are connected by roads marked in black. Here is the most important place on the map: Abraham, which the British must conquer from the French!



Units can move on land from one zone to another by means of the roads, and can move across the river by means of amphibious movement using ships.

Blocks

Ah, the blocks! There are 25 (plus a spare) for each player, red for the British and blue for the French, and your first job is going to be attaching stickers to them all!



Two of my children were only too happy to help me with this job!



If you're new to block war games, it's important to know that blocks are useful for two important reasons:
Bluffing: the information side is hidden from your opponent, simulating a fog of war (just like in Stratego)
Combat value: the number of diamonds on the top edge of the block indicates how many dice you throw for that block in combat (every '6' is a hit). When a block suffers combat damage, you rotate it 90 degrees for each hit taken in combat, until the value is reduced to zero, in which case that unit is eliminated.
It's a brilliant mechanism, and nearly 40 years later, is still standard fare in block war games today. Quebec 1759 is a good introduction to this concept, because heavier block war games add things like combat ratings and loyalty, all of which add theme, flavour, and more, but also increase the complexity. The way the blocks work in Quebec 1759 is much simpler and easy to learn than what is commonly seen in more contemporary block war games, which as a result will be much less accessible to the average euro-gamer. It's much easier to make the transition to the simpler style of Quebec 1759 than many other modern block war games. Let's introduce you to the different units, the strongest of which have a combat value of four (meaning that they roll 4 dice in combat), the weakest of which have a combat value of one.

Leaders

First of all, let me introduce you to the two leaders, the French general Marquis de Montcalm, and the British general James Wolfe.



Leaders have the advantage of some extra movement, and get to roll two instead of one dice for their combat value - but they are also vulnerable to dying more easily, just as happened to both generals in the actual battle.

Navy

Next up are four British naval units, which will help ferry British soldiers across the river.



Regiments

The regiments are historically accurate - here are the British:



And the French:



Militia

The French also have militia units, which were not professionally trained troops, but were mustered from the locals - there's some nice chrome rules about the French player losing some of these units to reflect what happened when the supply line from Montreal was cut, or when the British general threatened to destroy the crops of Quebec farmers.



Indians

In addition to the militia, the French have a useful ally in the Ottawa Indians, who have special capabilities for raiding and scouting.



Detachments

Both players also get a number of detachments (which replace decoy blocks from older editions). Having a combat value of only 1, these are very weak, but are useful for bluffing purposes, and pretending that they are actually a more powerful force.



Dice

There are four generic six-sided dice, which are used for combat.



If you're wondering about the changes implemented by the newest 2009 edition, there's an excellent thread discussion that here. For people already experienced with the game, you may also want to check out the Advanced rules (first published in the Canadian Wargamers Journal) here.

THEME

Overview

In an advertisement around the time when the game first appeared, the publisher described the theme as follows: "The British won the French and Indian War. On the Plains of Abraham, in the summer of 1759, Montcalm's French line broke before the advancing British expeditionary force under Wolfe. The battle cost the French their bastion at Quebec, and four years later they surrendered their empire in North America.
A new Canadian game, Quebec 1759, recreates the campaign that cost the French a continent. A deceivingly simple design masks an ingenious game system true to the 18th Century battle it depicts. Players assuming the French and British Commands deploy and engage units representing the Royal regulars and militia battalions actually involved in the struggle. By issuing written orders for maneuver and attack, simultaneous area movement, battle tactics, combat reduction, logistics, and naval units, are all brought into play as the British attempt to wrest the Abraham Heights from the defending French columns.
"

It's a fascinating historical battle, and there's good reason that bronzed statues of Wolfe and Montcalm grace Quebec's parliament building even today.



Many historians regard the events portrayed in Quebec 1759 as one of the most pivotal battles of history. This British victory over the French in Quebec was a key event that ensured that the tide of overall war went in favour of the British. Had it not been for Wolfe's victory on the Plains of Abraham, perhaps much more than just the Canadian province of Quebec would be speaking French in North America in the present. The Battle of the Plains of Abraham was a decisive British victory which on paper seems like many others conquests, but the ripple effect of this particular victory would travel much further than the banks of the St Lawrence.



The Campaign

At the time, northeastern North America was firmly in the hands of the French, although the British began a series of attacks to try to take over possession of the new continent. Under the command of General James Wolfe, a fleet of troops was dispatched to try to wrest control of the critical city of Quebec, at that time under the leadership of French General Montcalm - both depicted here with period artwork:



After first landing on the Île d'Orléans on 28 June, Wolfe's troops eventually established themselves on the south bank of the St Lawrence at Point Levis, from where they began bombarding the city of Quebec with artillery, and putting the city under siege. From here Wolfe had to decide how to try to capture Quebec. His first serious attempt was east of the city, at Beauport, which was fairly easily repelled by the French. Plans then began to develop for an attempted landing upriver from Quebec, which would also enable the British to cut off the supply line from Montreal.



Wolfe finally decided upon a daring landing by night at the cove of Foulon by night. The plan was to have his soldiers climb the rocky cliff, and assemble in a farmer's field now known as the Plains of Abraham for battle the next day.



The Battle

It's a fantastic and riveting story. The elements of secrecy and surprise worked, and after a successful landing and deployment of 5000 British troops in the plains of Abraham, Montcalm was lured out into battle with his men, after initially dismissing reports about an assault via the cliffs. Had he taken the threat seriously and allowed more time, he may have been able to summon support troops that were stationed west of the city. As it turned out, the decision to enter battle proved to be a disastrous move for the French. The line of British soldiers was a mile long and two men deep, and after some disorganized firing by the French, the British fired at close range with a volley that devastated the French and forced immediate retreat.



Remarkably, the battle itself lasted only about 15 minutes. It quickly turned into a decisive victory for the British, although Wolfe himself died on the field of battle.



General Montcalm died the following day, as a result of injuries sustained in the conflict.



The Aftermath

The aftermath of the battle is particularly important for later history. The British established themselves firmly in Quebec, and although the French were victorious in a subsequent battle west of the city, they were unable to wrest control of the city from the British, enabling the British forces to hold out until the arrival of their navy in the spring of the following year. The British went on to take Montreal, and the French could do little as the control of New France was turned over to the British, formally conceded as such by the Treaty of Paris in 1763. Without Wolfe's daring win, the course of history could have forever been altered.

All this is captured beautifully in the game Quebec 1759. The British player must make tough decisions about where and when to attack. Should he use some of his weaker forces to bluff, and try to draw the French army away from his main attack? Playing the British, you can even re-create the landing at the cove of Foulin and immediately attack Quebec at Abraham. But an amphibious landing is risky and difficult, and many other possible paths to victory need to be considered. So much of the history finds its way in the game, including the high likelihood of losing the generals in combat, desertion by French forces as a result of cut supply lines and threats to farmers, and even the feints and bluffing that were part of the real conflict. The historical map pictured below dates from September 5, 1759, and is entitled "A Map of the Plan of the River St. Laurence with the Operations of the Siege of Quebec". In Quebec 1759 this map becomes real, you are the generals, and history is repeated as two important military leaders engage in a battle of wits, with the ownership of the Canadian territories as the potential prize.



Documentaries

Want to learn more about the historical theme? Some basic knowledge of the history behind the game is certain to enhance your enjoyment of game-play, and you can start by watching several excellent video series available online:

"Plains of Abraham", excerpt from "Canada: A People's History, Episode 4: A Battle for a Continent"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HDRFHScDgGU

"The Battle for Canada", excerpt from "History's Turning Points" (The History Channel)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-6i7B6xJQjU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDJtvi46Am0
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0_0kR19Q7E

Excepts from "A History of Québec"
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jA-8H0XSSEE (#13 - The British Conquest 1759), start at 2:48
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vgU7K_qGB24 (#14 - The British Invasion of Québec)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4eVwzZ9a_A (#15 - The Battle of the Plains of Abraham)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MtxmbrBfoLU (#16 - The Battle of Ste-Foy and Pontiac)

The re-enacting, period costumes and other historical detail in these videos is excellent. Already after our first play of Quebec 1759, my children were genuinely interested in learning more about the history behind the game, and were more than eager to watch these videos with me. Talk about educational value!

As far as good reading material is concerned, I've seen reference made to Francis Parkman's "Montcalm and Wolfe" (Atheneum, 1984), but would welcome suggestions for other recommended sources on the subject. Meanwhile for people new to the historical conflict, you can start your discovery on articles like the ones on Wikipedia, although a Google search for "Battle of the Plains of Abraham" will turn up many other websites with good historical information. There's even an interactive website with a virtual museum about the battle, produced by the Canadian government: http://1759.ccbn-nbc.gc.ca



GAME-PLAY

Set-up

At the start of the game, all blocks are put in play - the British deploy the four naval vessels in the Bason and all their units on Ile d'Orleans, while the French can deploy their units in any of the remaining nine zones (labelled in red) on the board. In this example, the French player has chosen to place all his units in the areas around the Bason:



The game features a wonderful aspect of fog of war, because you don't know exactly where your opponent is placing his more powerful units. Is the mobilizing of soldiers on the right a feint or bluff? Or is it the main attack? That's all part of the fun of this game!

Win Condition

The game consists of 16 turns, and on each turn both players will move simultaneously. The British win the game if they control Abraham at the end of turn 16, and have units with at least 20 CVs on the board. The French win if they can reduce the British forces below 20 CVs, or prevent them from controlling Abraham at the end of turn 16. In this example, the British have defeated the French on the plains of Abraham and taken Quebec on the last turn to win the game - just like in history!



The game will frequently culminate in a final battle on the plains of Abraham, and in that respect the climax of the game often has a strong historical flavour.

Flow of Play

Note that I won't cover every single detail of the rules, but what follows captures all the basics and main elements.

Movement

In each of the 16 turns, both players will secretly issue orders to one group of units on the board. After writing down their move for that turn, the moves are revealed and implemented. Not all the units of a group have to move, but only units from one location can be ordered to move, and can move in different directions. The three kinds of possible movement are as follows:
1. Land movement: Units from a group can move along a road to an adjacent zone.
2. Amphibious movement: Movement across the river must occur either in the St Laurent zone (i.e. between Cap Rouge, Sillery, Abraham, and Etchemin) or the Bason zone (i.e. between Ile d'Orleans, Levis, St Charles, Beauport, and Montgomery. The British can amphibiously move only one unit per ship (i.e. a maximum of four units if all four ships are in that river zone), while the French can only amphibiously move up to four units in the St Laurent zone (this is reduced for each British ship in the St Laurent zone).
3. Ship movement: The British can move 2 ships upriver on their turn from Bason to Laurent, or as many ships downriver from Laurent to Bason. Note that if doing ship movement, you may not move any other units that turn.

See chaosbreaker's excellent order sheet to help plan your moves:



In the example below, British redcoats have used several turns of amphibious movement to cross the Bason (four at a time), and are now advancing by land movement on Quebec, where General Montcalm is holed up in his fortress, hoping to survive!



Battles

A battle results when units from both players end up in the same zone after movement. The units that were already in the contested zone are regarded as the "Defender" (the French are considered the "Defender" if both players move into an empty zone). Keeping his units hidden, the Defender must deploy his units into three columns, after which the Attacker does the same. Both players can keep units in reserve. Here's an example:



Battle resolution occurs as follows, beginning with the player who is Defender:
1. Optional retreat. Except for the Defender on the first turn, the active player can retreat all units to an adjacent zone, which must not be a battle zone or be controlled by the enemy.
2. Optional reinforcement. The active player has the option to add one unit from his reserve to one of his three columns.
3. Fire all units. One column at a time, the active player fires all units at the opposing column. You roll dice equal to the combat value of each unit (e.g. four dice for a 4 CV unit), and each `6' rolled scores a hit, and the other player must reduce a unit in that column by 1 CV (by rotating the block) for each hit. To reflect the defender's advantage in an amphibious attack, the defender fires each of his units at double CV on his first battle turn only (note that for battle purposes, an attack between St Charles and Abraham is considered amphibious, because of the defence afforded by the St Charles River).

The Attacker then goes through the same three steps; then the Defender again; until one player retreats or is routed. A rout happens when all units in a column are eliminated - then the battle stops immediately, and the player that is routed must retreat. In the case of a rout, the player that won the battle gets to fire all his units one more time at the retreating player to reflect pursuit fire. NB: If one player has less than three units, a single-column "Skirmish" is fought in the same way, but without reserves, routing, or pursuit fire.

In the picture below, the British redcoats have moved by land from Sillery to Abraham, to engage General Montcalm and the French in a final battle for Quebec! The British have three columns of three units each, along with a single reserve, and the French have two columns of two units each, with a single reserve. As Defender, the French will get the opportunity to fire first.



Other Thematic Elements

There are several elements of "chrome" in the game, which reflect the historical background of the events depicted in the game, and add to the enjoyment of gameplay by strengthening the theme.

Leaders

Each side's leader, Wolfe (British) and Montcalm (French), can move an extra zone by land movement, and also can roll two dice (instead of one) in battle. However, the leaders die if a double is rolled. Here General James Wolfe is fatally wounded (after rolling a double 5) in a Battle in Beauport.



This rule reflects the fact that both leaders died as a result of combat during the Battle of Abraham. In this famous painting, the mortally wounded General Montcalm is taken to Quebec.



Indians

The French had assistance from the Ottawa Indians, which is reflected in the game by a special unit. When moving the Ottawa Indians, it is the only move the French player can do that turn. However, to reflect the fact that the Indians were superb guerilla fighters, the Indians unit can be moved to any zone on the board! In their new locations, the Indians can then either Raid (attacking at double CV, with only the Light Infantry or American Rangers being able to fire back), or Scout (by forcing the British player to reveal four units in that zone), and then immediately retreating to any friendly or neutral zone. They can also fight in battles as a reserve, but are eliminated when reduced to 1 CV or when the total French strength is 10CV or less - reflecting the fact that they were unreliable allies.

Their ability to make a surprise raid anywhere on the board and then disappear into obscurity is extremely useful, and very thematic! Pictured below we see an Indian raid on four British units in Levis:



Desertion

Desertion by Quebec Militia

In addition to their organized regiments, the French had the support of local militia from Quebec. To counter this, Wolfe threatened to destroy crops of Quebec farmers who had joined the militia - a clever move that sparked fear and desertion. In the game, this is reflected by the French needing to eliminate a Quebec militia unit every time the British occupy a new zone for the first time.

Cutting Off Montreal Supplies

The French relied on supplies from Montreal, and seeking to cutting off the supply line to Quebec was one of Wolfe's attempted strategies. In the game, this is reflected by the French player needing to eliminate a Montreal militia unit at the end of every turn if the British occupy Cap Rouge, as is the case in the picture below.



As a result of these thematic elements, the French player will often find his force weakening as the game progresses!

CONCLUSIONS

What do I think?

I've swum in the waters of block wargaming once before, when I learned and played Richard III. For your average eurogamer, you can quickly find yourself feeling out of depth in more advanced block war games, and even with the often mentioned introductory block war games like Richard III and Hammer of the Scots. Quebec 1759 is probably a much better place to start, because the rule-set is much easier. Some critics will argue that the game suffers from somewhat of an imbalance in favour of the British and that it lacks replayability or can become stale if played too often due to a finite amount of possible strategies to explore. Two big fans of the game, Burt Decaire and Greg Sawchuk, are cited on the publisher's website as stating this: "Every game is different. Even after playing 500+ games, no game is alike." If anyone can speak from experience, it's these two guys: "We play Québec 1759 in our warkitchen every Tuesday afternoon and no matter how many times we play, we want more. We crave this game. We never tire of it. We can't wait to play again, to rectify past mistakes, to try new stratagems and tricks, to lay new traps and deceptions… So why do they like it? "The game is historically accurate. Battles are exciting, realistic and suspenseful. Time is of the essence in a battle and the 16 move format captures this principle. Yet within each move there are countless possibilities. Fate and Providence are also ineluctable in every battle situation… and the role of fate is incorporated in this game through the dice." What these two gamers have to say about Quebec 1759 has a lot of merit. Some of the chief elements that appeal to me about Quebec 1759 are:
fog of war: the design really lends itself well to evoking a cat and mouse game with lots of tension created by bluffing and simultaneous movement.
simplicity and elegance: it's very easy to learn and explain, and makes a great entry point for discovering the world of block war games, within the reasonable time frame of 45-60 minutes.
rich historical flavour: considering the relatively simple rule-set, Quebec 1759 does a surprisingly remarkable job of incorporating many elements that reflect the historical situation, including the climactic battle in the Plains of Abraham which often determines the ultimate winner.



Overall, Quebec 1759 was ahead of its time, and it's hard to believe that this is game first made in 1972. With the new look of the 2009 edition, it feels very contemporary, which is probably a reflection of how influential it has been. It can rightly regarded as somewhat of a pioneer in the genre of block war games, has shaped much of what we see today, and yet remains fresh for gamers in the 21st century - an outstanding achievement on all levels!

What do others think?

Since it came out in 1972, this game has been well received and continues to be enjoyed and appreciated, as these positive comments indicate:
"Good intro to block style games." - James Bardsley
"Fun and quick. Easy to teach and understand, but rich in options and possibilities." - Winky Blinky
"Easy to understand, good exiting level, good replay value, fog of war (hidden units, decoy counters and simultaneous movement) particularly well designed." - Jean-Pierre Maurais
"Interesting puzzle of a game, with lively dice factor and a beautiful board. And, it has the virtue of quick play." - Pete Gelman
"An excellent 2 player wargame that plays in an hour." - Eddy Vickery
"There is a lot of tension as British forces slowly cross the river into Quebec, repelled by a much weaker French force, all leading to a usually exciting climax in the Battle of the Plains of Abraham." - James Fehr
"Stratego with historical flavour. Plenty to think about." - Richard Vickery
"Fast playing and fun with a real sense of the historical impact of the situation." - Deacon
"Blocks are well used here to create the fog-of-war effect allowing players to bluff and counter-bluff. Brilliant design that produces a very tense game." - Elijah Lau
"A great simple block game (probably the simplest of them all). Tense and fast, fairly easy to learn and teach, and very replayable." - swandive78
"Simple and quick.... great intro to wargaming game." - Joe Steadman
"This was a great game when it came out and has never lost its appeal. You can play a dozen games in a row and not feel like you've exhausted its possibilities." - David Sullivan
"...substantially exceeded expectations. Short, simple tense." -Chris Farrell

If there are criticisms, they are mostly from people who don't like block war games to begin with, or who found that the strategic options were too limited and wanted more complexity and replayability. But overall the consensus is very strong: if you're looking for an introductory block game with simple rules and strong historical flavour, this is it!



Recommendation

Is Quebec 1759 for you? I've already had three hours of immense enjoyment in the three plays I've enjoyed with my ten year old son, and both of us are a long way from being sick of it just yet, and we're already planning new strategies for future contests. As far as introductory block war games go, this is the real deal. It may lack some of the replayability and complexity of the more recent block war games, but it has the advantage of offering a much more accessible game that is still of a high calibre, and retains a wonderful historical flavour. Not every eurogamer is going to be as excited about it as we are, but it certainly has an appeal and accessibility that many eurogamers will find within reach and worthwhile. It's a natural step up from games like Stratego, and yet offers so much more in terms of gameplay and theme. Now that a revised edition has been published in 2009 that tweaks the rules and makes the components match the latest in block war games, there's never been a better time for a newbie to try exploring the strange waters of block war-gaming. This eurogamer gives Quebec 1759 a thumbs up!



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mb The complete list of Ender's pictorial reviews: http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/37596

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"L'état, c'est moi."
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Roger's Reviews: check out my reviews page, right here on BGG!
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Re: So you're wondering about your first ever block war game: A comprehensive pictorial overview of a time-tested classic that even eurogamers can enjoy
Lovely review as always!

May I heartily recommend the variant rules from the Canadian Wargamer Journal to you once you've mastered the basic game? It adds a lot to the game without adding too much complexity.

Said rules are in the file section - http://www.boardgamegeek.com/filepage/21455/quebec-1759-cwj-...

I have the original edition with the stamped blocks, and it will always have a spot on my gaming shelf.
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Georg von Lemberg
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Re: So you're wondering about your first ever block war game: A Comprehensive Pictorial Overview of a time-tested classic that even eurogamers can enjoy
Excellent review! will have to add this game to my list of potential purchases for the next few months.
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Re: So you're wondering about your first ever block war game: A Comprehensive Pictorial Overview of a time-tested classic that even eurogamers can enjoy
I hate you. Ordered.
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Doug Ratz
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Re: So you're wondering about your first ever block war game: A Comprehensive Pictorial Overview of a time-tested classic that even eurogamers can enjoy
I played this a long time ago (in a galaxy far far away...) and have seen it on the shelves of various stores. Reading your review makes me want to run out and buy it.
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Re: So you're wondering about your first ever block war game: A Comprehensive Pictorial Overview of a time-tested classic that even eurogamers can enjoy
Excellent review, Enders!
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Re: So you're wondering about your first ever block war game: A Comprehensive Pictorial Overview of a time-tested classic that even eurogamers can enjoy
Gold star review It was nice to hear how it had been updated. I remember playing it once in the 70s. Super good job!
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Re: So you're wondering about your first ever block war game: A Comprehensive Pictorial Overview of a time-tested classic that even eurogamers can enjoy
It's almost unfair (in a "good" sense) that when one reads one of your reviews, they are going to spend money because of you, but they will also get a brief "history lesson" as well. Nice job!
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Re: So you're wondering about your first ever block war game: A Comprehensive Pictorial Overview of a time-tested classic that even eurogamers can enjoy
Thank you for that wonderful review and description. I played this game many times in the 70ies and early 80ies. It was the time where all the old roll and move games were definitively banished to the past by games with new mechanics - not only in Europe (from Pelikan, Bütehorn, Ravensburger, FX Schmid, and others), but also from the "New World" (Avalon Hill in the US, Gamma Two in Canada or Jedko in Australia).

I hope that I will find the time to play Quebec 1759 again someday...
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Larry Welborn
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Re: So you're wondering about your first ever block war game: A Comprehensive Pictorial Overview of a time-tested classic that even eurogamers can enjoy
Great Review.

Quote:
For your average wargamer, you can quickly find yourself feeling out of depth in more advanced block war games, and even with the often mentioned introductory block war games like Richard III and Hammer of the Scots. Quebec 1759 is probably a much better place to start, because the rule-set is much easier


Did you mean "your average eurogamer" here? I don't think the average wargamer would have much trouble at all with virtually any block game.
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Re: So you're wondering about your first ever block war game: A Comprehensive Pictorial Overview of a time-tested classic that even eurogamers can enjoy
This was my "Father's Day Gift" should be arriving tomorrow - yeahhhh!

I am looking forward to playing this with my daughter - as she can trace her maternal lineage to the early-mid 1600's with the settlement of Quebec.

("Hey you just shot grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-grand-papa!")
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Re: So you're wondering about your first ever block war game: A Comprehensive Pictorial Overview of a time-tested classic that even eurogamers can enjoy
Fantastic review. I've always beena big fan of this game and I often use it to introduce block games to new players.
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Re: So you're wondering about your first ever block war game: A Comprehensive Pictorial Overview of a time-tested classic that even eurogamers can enjoy


Superb work


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Amazing review thumbsup

J. cool

PS Since I read the whole thing, I only found one small spelling mistake. At the para above the color landing picture of the redcoats, replace the f in Beaufort to a p, as to read Beauport.

Again, an amazing review.
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Superbe!
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Your reviews are always fantastic, but I particularly enjoyed the history lesson and references. Above and beyond, my good man.
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Thanks to your wonderful review, I'm going to have to dig this game out and give it a try! I was lucky enough to come across a copy with stamped tiles in a charity shop recently, and after reading this review it's sure to see some much needed attention. Thanks!
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Seth Owen
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Hertzog wrote:
Thanks to your wonderful review, I'm going to have to dig this game out and give it a try! I was lucky enough to come across a copy with stamped tiles in a charity shop recently, and after reading this review it's sure to see some much needed attention. Thanks!


That must be one of the very early editions. Note that there have been some rules changes since that version, if so.
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wargamer55 wrote:
Hertzog wrote:
Thanks to your wonderful review, I'm going to have to dig this game out and give it a try! I was lucky enough to come across a copy with stamped tiles in a charity shop recently, and after reading this review it's sure to see some much needed attention. Thanks!


That must be one of the very early editions. Note that there have been some rules changes since that version, if so.


Thanks for the info. Sadly, my copy didn't contain a rule book (even though all the playing pieces were intact), so I downloaded a copy of the rules from the game's file section.

Many thanks to all the file uploaders! Living on the southern tip of Africa, it often makes a huge difference to be able to access these documents
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Hertzog wrote:
wargamer55 wrote:
Hertzog wrote:
Thanks to your wonderful review, I'm going to have to dig this game out and give it a try! I was lucky enough to come across a copy with stamped tiles in a charity shop recently, and after reading this review it's sure to see some much needed attention. Thanks!


That must be one of the very early editions. Note that there have been some rules changes since that version, if so.


Thanks for the info. Sadly, my copy didn't contain a rule book (even though all the playing pieces were intact), so I downloaded a copy of the rules from the game's file section.

Many thanks to all the file uploaders! Living on the southern tip of Africa, it often makes a huge difference to be able to access these documents


You'll need to make some adjustments in order to use the older blocks. The blanks are now 1 CV detachments. The old game doesn't have the leaders so you'll need to make a homemade sticker for one blank on each side for the leaders. And the Indians are now a 4 CV unit instead of two non-CV units.

OR you can just order new blocks and stickers from Columbia and upgrade your game that way. You already have the downloaded rules and there are no other components aside from the box. That's what I did. The older game had a mounted mapboard, which is nicer, in my opinion.

Note that you can download the latest version of the rules from Columbia Games' own site as well.
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WOW!!!!
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verdunjp wrote:
WOW!!!!


Exactly what I thought. Great review, thanks Ender.
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I got this game a couple of months ago on a whim, from an classified ad for $15, only to let it sit on my shelf. However, your exceptional overview has caused me to take it out and learn it ASAP.

Also, since my French Canadian ancestors settled and lived in the area portrayed on the map, I have a more than academic reason to try to rewrite history and run the British (in the form of my wife, who's half-English) out of Canada...Vive le Quebec libre! devil
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Excellent review.

One of the best Introductory Wargames ever designed.

Still play it regularly, more then 30 years later.

Vive la Nouvelle France !
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Bloody amazing, a stunning review. Exhaustively comprehensive.
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