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Subject: RISK 2210 - a detailed review of an underated Gateway game. rss

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Mike Em
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Advanced warning: People who scoff outright at Risk and complain endlessly about chance and bad luck, and claim there is no real strategy in Risk, etc are not going to like this game, Might as well stop reading now. There is nothing I can say that will make change your mind. There is chance in Risk, and there is chance in this variation of Risk as well. If you're still reading, I hope you enjoy/tolerate what I have to say!

RISK 2210 - A REVIEW


(picture credit: Darthlord)

1.COMPONENTS

All in all, the pieces are nicely made and everything adds to theme of the game. After a couple plays some of the cards and energy tokens may wear a little bit, but for the most part this game's components are pretty strudy.

1A.Pieces


(picture credit: Martin Ralya)

MODS (Or your basic units/soldiers)

(picture credit:Me 262 Schwalbe)

Like all Risk games, (and wargames in general) Risk comes with a lot of pieces. In 2210, your basic soldier is referred to as M.O.D. There are three different molds of Mod's in the box - a small robot (in the middle on the picture) representing a single unit, a taller robot with legs and pointy front (the one on the left) representing 3 units and the biggest with legs and guns mounted on both shoulders (on the right) representing 5 units. Its pretty easy to see these on the board, and easily make change for units when needed, thanks to the three different denominations. The game is max 5 players so there are also 5 colors of armies - blue, green, red, black and brownish orange.

COMMANDERS (Or your special pieces that affect combat and allow cards/expansion)


(picture credit: pedropablogmz)

Each army has 5 commanders. They are pictured above, from left to right they are "Nuclear, Naval, Diplomat, Space and Land. The commanders go on the board with your regular units. At the start of the game you begin with a land Commander and a diplomat. The diplomat rolls a higer dice for defense when attacked, while the land commander rolls a higher dice when launching a land attack. As the game progresses, you have the option of purchasing more commanders. The naval allows access to all of your troops to the underwater territories and rolls higher dice in any water battle it initiates. The space commander allows you to use your space station as an access point to one of the landing spots on the moon. It also rolls higher dice when initiating battle on the moon. The nuclear commander rolls higher dice whenever he initiates a battle no matter where it is on either board.


SPACE STATIONS (or your dirct connection to the Moon and other good stuff)

Each player begins with a space station. They are immobile and placed in one spot for the entire game. The space station (once you have a space commander) is your connection to and from space. It also get you an extra unit and energy each turn. (albeit the unit must be placed in the same territory as the space station. It is still mobile, but it just has to start there) The space station also defends higher, but in this case, it confers the bonus to a regular unit – it doesn’t actually defend without mod’s or commanders present.

1B.Boards

THE WORLD OF THE FUTURE


(picture credit: TMJJS)

The world is quite different in the future. But as far as gameplay goes, you are looking at the same basic shapes and placement of territories. The new water territories give a few new borders and passages between the old continents we're used to. The sea territories are very well impplemented as easy to understand. They are also big enough to fit quite a few troops on their spaces. Using the different denominations of mods, you should have no trouble fitting troops in spaces anywhere on the board. The board construction is durable and easy to understand.

THE MOON


(picture credit: Aarontu)

The Moon fits into the game through your space stations and space commanders. There are three continents on the moon, and each continent has a "landing spot" - shown with the small white dot in the centre of the territory. The moon spaces are a little smaller in some cases, but the various denominations of mods makes it pretty simple to keep control of pieces.

SCOREBOARD


(picture credit: Aaron Tu)

There is also a cardboard scoreboard included in the game, used for keeping track of territories you control, as well as your units and energy received each turn. It also has a small list of the continents and associated bonuses of the moon as well as a turn # counter. NOthing too fancy but it does the job, and relays the information its supposed to.

1C.Cards

(picture credit: garion)

There are 2 types of cards in this game. The first type is territory cards – 3 kinds (land, sea, and space), each with a picture of a different territory in the game used for determining random territories. (These cards can also be used to play the board as regular vanilla risk game – don’t bother, this board is much better suited for its intended use!) The second type of cards is the Command deck. There are 5 decks, each corresponding in colour, name and attributes to one of the five commanders you can deploy. Land cars mainly deal with aggressive attack and defense tactics on land territories, Naval deal with the sea territories and Space with the space territories. Diplomat cards tend to be more defensive or even evasive in nature, while Nuclear cards are about all out aggression.

The Command cards are diverse, well implemented and explained. In most cases, after a single game there is no longer any needed to keep checking the rulebook to see exactly how this or that card is handled because its explained pretty well right on the card itself. Most of the cards are useful, a few "commander influence" cards only affect your score at the end of the game if the commander is still alive - these can be a bit of a bummer to get in early turns. Most of the others are pretty exciting, especially the good old frequency jam - a card that stops others from playing defense cards, used right before you launch a massive attack.

Sometimes that art on the cards leaves a bit to be desired but nothing about the cards hurts gameplay - they convey the information they are supposed to and serve the purpose they are meant to. The game is about conquering the world, not collecting cards so I find this acceptable.

1D.Chips and Pieces


(picture credit both images: Jezztek)

Energy tokens count as currency. (there's alsways been more then enough chips in any game I've played) There are turn order tokens, and many dice included as well as 4 "defvastation" markers placed randomly at the start of the game that block territories for the duration of the game. Depending on the version of the game you buy, you may end up with d6's and d8's or d6's and d10's - more on that later.

1E. Rulebook
The rule book is very easy to get through and explains the game quite well. No complaints here.

2. GAMEPLAY
Like the startup of regular risk, there are a few variations in how different groups go about selecting and placing original troops. In this case, sea and moon territories begin the game as empty neutral spaces. Everyone gets a few energy chips to use in bidding for turn order on the first turn and the game begins.

The player who starts goes through a couple of steps to complete their turn. “Collect energy and deploy mods” is the first step where you check your current territories, receive and then place your mods and energy. This is also where you would put an extra unit on any space stations you control. Then is buying Commanders (3 energy each, including ones you’ve lost in battle you wish to bring back to the board) and Space stations (5 energy. Although if these are ever captured they become the property of whoever now owns the territory they are in). Then you can buy up to four Command ards (for corresponding commanders you own.) You must finish buying cards before you can look at any of the ones you’ve just bought. Then you may begin playing cards and invading other territories. If you invade three or more contested territories on your turn you receive an energy point and a free command matching one of your commanders on the board. After you are finished that, then you get a fortify move. And then it’s the next players turn. After all players have gone, the year ends, you move the year marker and begin bidding for the second year.

At the end of the game, you can add your continent bonus to your # of territories on the score card, followed by 3 points for each influence card for a commander still alive at the end of the game. The rulebook gives a long list of tie breaking conditions but it is unlikely you will see to many ties in this game.


(picture credit: TMJJS)

So that’s the gameplay in a nutshell but what does it really amount to? Like any game of Risk (and most boardgames), its all about figuring out what you want to do, figuring out and stopping your opponent(s), and figuring out how you want to balance between the two. Turn order plays a big part in this game because if you go last one turn and successfully capture a continent, then it is in your interest to go first or as early as you can in the next turn so you can make use of that bonus before someone breaks your continent and takes your bonus away. To win bids for turn order you need energy chips, but you also use those chips for buying commanders, stations and cards – and sometimes the cards cost to be played. So managing your energy points becomes quite important – an opponent who builds up a lot of energy chips is very dangerous, because they may be able to just buy the bid for turn order. In a multiplayer game, it’s a constantly changing battle between deciding who is your friend, who you can afford to ignore and who you have to attack.


(picture credit: Nodens77)

The Nuke commander wields some pretty serious cards – but they have a high cost in energy and there are a few that can actually backfire! The naval commander is an early favorite because in most games, almost everyone can reach a sea zone somewhere. Space battles tend to be a little trickier – and the continents are harder to defend but they definitely add a lot of excitement to the game – there are a few naval and space command cards that are pretty deadly too!


(photo credit: gamegrunt)

As far as balance goes, its not bad if you play smart – if you are dumb enough to lose a major confrontation in the first turn, you could be in a rough spot for the rest of the game. That’s just how it is – how you play affects how you do, and yes, there is chance involved in that. But if you play the game accounting for chance, you have to factor in that the land card your opponent is hanging onto might be the “death trap” that instantly kills half of your invading force and adjust your plan accordingly. Too often is seems players on forums complain about getting burned in this game when they basically put their hand in the fire in the first place.

I don’t deny that its possible for players to be unjustly picked on. That’s where you have to choose the people you play with. No different then diplomacy, regular risk, samurai swords etc, if the player in 2nd place is more content about being in 2nd place then going after 1st place, than you might have a problem. This game is made to be competitive game, where every player is figuring how to take down the board leader, while simultaneously plotting their own rise to power.

This game is called Risk 2210 so you have to realize right away that the gameplay and concepts are similar to regular risk. So looking at what has been added, I’d say they did a pretty good job – there is a lot of extra depth and options, while the feel of classic RISK is still there as well.



3. PROS/CONS

3A.PROS

-The limited game length. The game lasts 5 turns, you tally everything up and count the score. Some people have some complaints about the final turn - it is very important that you consider your bid for turn order and your moves carefully. Going earlier in the last turn means you want to balance expansion and defense while going later gives you the opportunity to abandon defense and go all out. However, the player who goes last can also by quite crippled by the point by other players actions so you have to be very careful how you handle this. it feels like the end of the game comes at a perfect time and leaves you wanting more. In some circumstances, some players may already be eliminated before this point, but fort everyone still playing it tends to end on a pretty exciting note - especially if a winning player is defending his territories from a final turn blitz.
-The moon and the sea. These added areas give a lot more space for expansion and add more tactical options as well. Having the option to not just have to attack someone, and be able to expand in either of these two directions can make for interesting alliances.
-The commanders and cards. Individual strategy is a lot more diverse in this than regular risk. Your choice of which commanders you utilize can vary quite a bit from other players. Having different armies with different combinations of commanders on the board makes strategy very interesting. After two players buy a space commander on the first turn, the third might decide to focus on a naval commnder,a nuke commander or just focus and land and diplomat cards. The cards also add a great deal of unpredictability to the game.

3B.CONS

-Players of heavier wargames will probably not be huge fans of a few of the more ameritrash aspects of this game. Combat in Risk is a pretty simpe affair and even commanders and cards don't add very much in terms of complexity.
-Earlier games were packaged with a d10 rather than a d8 for the commanders to use. Strange, small complaint that is easily fixed. Also adds the potential to just use the d10 and have the 0 and 9 have extra houseruled meanings.
-Depending on which edition of the game you buy, you might end up with a larger or smaller box. This may affect your storage slightly - I have the bigger version and find everything fits nicely if a bit unorganized - some baggies and cardboxes will help this.

4. CONCLUSIONS

As I mentioned in the review title, I think this is an excellent gateway game (and not just because i worked on my friends!). Vanilla Risk is one of the most conventional, mainstream boardgames that still requires a little more thought and time to play. Adapting players from Risk to Risk 2210 is a breeze. IMO, there is no way any player who would sit down for a game of Risk, would not be excited about trying this for the first time. And then you have them! Limited turn order, calculating victory points, managing money (energy points) and troops are all concepts used in much deeper games - and not just war games.

A gaming group that has moved on to abstract or deep conceptual games may not have much use for this lighter, thematic game and I can definately understand that. This is a game where the board leader can change in the blink of an eye based on a well executed tactic or even a lucky roll. Players are encouraged to make alliances and pacts, and betray each other etc. Definately not meant to be taken as a serious wargame but as an enjoyable way to spend an evening with family or friends! I've owned this game for probably nearly 10 years and it still hits the table, and often with some of the same friends I played it with when I first bought it.
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Moshe Callen
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ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
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μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος/ οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί᾽ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε᾽ ἔθηκε,/...
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Even though I (a definite Risk fan) disagree, it's still a solid review.

How would you respond to my criticisms of this game:
1. What I love about the Risk games if that they share the basic combat mechanic but otherwise are very diverse games. Witness my geeklist on the subject. Unfortunately this, Risk: Godstorm and possibly some later additions to the series are exceptions to this in the sense that what one is trying to do is not fundamentally different than the original classic Risk. I feel a bit cheated by this one because I'm not really trying to accomplish anything new and interesting-- like say LotR Risk, Castle Risk or Risk: Star Wars – The Clone Wars Edition do.

2. The turn limit is not in my view a benefit. Skilled players ill generally finish a game of classic Risk in 5-6 rounds anyway but the combination of the turn limit and cards which do not at all help the strategic depth of the game lead to a very arbitrary feel to a game, something which in the other games of the series is just not the case.

I like the game well enough to keep and to play, but it is decidedly my least favorite of the series I own.

EDIT:
I just want to emphasize that I'm intending this as a real question wanting the reviewer's perspective. I love the Risk games generally but I'm just not getting this one and if I can find a way to approach this game that puts it on the strategic level of the other games in the series I have, then I'll be very happy.
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John "Omega" Williams
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Interesting review. This game rather frequently gets very unfairly badmouthed on the BGG.

Two note: The two versions of the game have slightly different production standards. The small box version uses notably flimsier cardstock for the moon and tokens.

Depending on your gaming group the 5 turn limit can be potentially a con type problem as whoever goes last on the last turn can make a blitz for points that otherwise they would not have been able to risk as no one will be able to retaliate. But a savvy group of players aware of this can easily nullify that advantage by one or more means. Or just remove the turn limit.

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mar hawkman
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I dislike the turn limit and usually play without it. Not that most games of Risk really need the turn limit.

I also LOOVE the factions expansion. It changes the game in a very cool way.
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Booker Hooker
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Is it as much fun as Nexus Ops?
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Ryan
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Great game and thanks for the review! It's nice to see this game getting any good attention it can.

I played this game a lot in college and agree that it is a good choice for a gateway game. It's best if players don't take things personal (goes with nearly every game), because using coercion, cajoling, threats, lying, backstabbing, etc. as the rule book suggests to achieve your goals add another important front to this game. Your military objectives hinge on how well you can out fox your opponents. Support them here to build up some trust, and stab them in the back to maximize your gain.

I remember a four player game in college (I had a good win percentage, and was known for it) in which the other three players teamed up against me for most of the game. Until I planted the seed of doubt in one of the players, we'll call him the shifty eyed dog. I watched as his uncertainty about the other players' motivations nagged at his mind. He eventually couldn't trust his allies to avoid his vulnerable heartland, at which he turned on them The triumvirate collapsed on itself and with all its missile launchers pointed inward, my M.O.D.s were able to switch from a tenacious defense to a victory point grabbing bloodthirsty offensive.

No game can be good for all people, but this game is so much fun for those in the know who appreciate it's strategy, diplomacy, theme, and ever lurking chaos.
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Mike Em
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Thanks for all the responses everyone - this post is mainly meant to respond to whac3/Moshe callen's criticism's of the game directed to me in his post. Nice geeklist btw.

1. I definitely recognize what you are saying - the LOTR one specifically seems to offer a lot of extra depth. I don't pretend that this game re invents risk - it merely offers a little additional depth and options with a little more theme as well.

2. this is one that I will argue a bit (but not too much, as you raise a very valid concern) first let me say, that if this mechanic were removed - and the game continued until there was only one person left - i would enjoy it immensely. But with my gaming group, having the game end after 5 turns means that for the most part, no one is sitting on the sidelines for too long waiting for the game to end because they got knocked out. I would say the game ending in 5 turns doesn't take away strategy from the game, but rather means that the decisions you make in your 5 turns are even more important.

Thanks for your thoughts

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Thanks for the review, quite timely since I just picked up my first copy at Goodwill on a super discount last week. You've got me quite jazzed up to play it now, as if I wasn't excited enough by looking at the awesome components already.
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Moshe Callen
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ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
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μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος/ οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί᾽ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε᾽ ἔθηκε,/...
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FreeHansje wrote:
whac3 wrote:


2. The turn limit is not in my view a benefit. Skilled players ill generally finish a game of classic Risk in 5-6 rounds anyway...


Really?! I can only think you need an (un)Godly stroke of luck to be able to accomplish your secret task in 5-6 rounds. Or is something else meant with Classic Risk?

No, I mean the original and if you know what you're doing that's normal.
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against worthy opponents or against chumps?
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Andrew C
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Excellent review. Well thought out, written, and organized.

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Moshe Callen
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ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
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μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος/ οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί᾽ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε᾽ ἔθηκε,/...
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marhawkman wrote:
against worthy opponents or against chumps?

against other people who also know how to play.

The game is VERY cut-throat when played well.
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Ah, basically a play group that does mostly all-out offense?
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ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
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μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος/ οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί᾽ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε᾽ ἔθηκε,/...
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marhawkman wrote:
Ah, basically a play group that does mostly all-out offense?

Not to the complete lack of defense, no, but yes if you mean very aggressive play. The name of the game is Risk for a reason.
 
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Andrew Prizzi
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Quote:
Is it as much fun as Nexus Ops?


Fun is certainly a matter of personal taste, but I for one find Risk 2210 much more fun than Nexus Ops. Nexus Ops was ok, but I sold my copy after about a dozen plays. Risk 2210 is one of my favorite games.
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whac3 wrote:
marhawkman wrote:
Ah, basically a play group that does mostly all-out offense?
Not to the complete lack of defense, no, but yes if you mean very aggressive play. The name of the game is Risk for a reason.
And for question two: How often do they win?
 
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ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
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marhawkman wrote:
whac3 wrote:
marhawkman wrote:
Ah, basically a play group that does mostly all-out offense?
Not to the complete lack of defense, no, but yes if you mean very aggressive play. The name of the game is Risk for a reason.
And for question two: How often do they win?

virtually every time
 
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ἄνδρα μοι ἔννεπε, μοῦσα, πολύτροπον, ὃς μάλα πολλὰ/ πλάγχθη, ἐπεὶ Τροίης ἱερὸν πτολίεθρον ἔπερσεν./...
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μῆνιν ἄειδε θεὰ Πηληϊάδεω Ἀχιλῆος/ οὐλομένην, ἣ μυρί᾽ Ἀχαιοῖς ἄλγε᾽ ἔθηκε,/...
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FreeHansje wrote:
whac3 wrote:
marhawkman wrote:
whac3 wrote:
marhawkman wrote:
Ah, basically a play group that does mostly all-out offense?
Not to the complete lack of defense, no, but yes if you mean very aggressive play. The name of the game is Risk for a reason.
And for question two: How often do they win?

virtually every time


I just dont believe it. Is it possible to video broadcast such a game? It seems impossible to me. So much depends on luck.

"so much depends on luck"ignores the fact that any set of dice combinations is governed by a Gaussian distribution. I don't care whether you choose to believe me or not. I've been playing Risk for 30 years now, and I've played it at least thousands of times. With all due respect, I'm convinced you have no idea what you're talking about, but frankly I do not care. I have better things to do than try to convince random strangers on the internet.
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John "Omega" Williams
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I can say most certainly that the so called "luck" problem. Aint.
On our very first game of Risk 2210 I had astounding absolutely 100% luck with the rolls. I could virtually not roll badly. We even dragged out a dice tower! It *improved* my luck!

And yet I was near obliterated by the final turn with my beleaguered army entrenched on the Moon and only a bad roll on the opponents side prevented him from gaining a foothold and wiping me out totally.
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Gaussian distribution(AKA normal distribution or bell curve) is when good results are as common as bad results. Therefore getting lucky will usually get balanced out by getting unlucky. it is by no means guaranteed.

see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Normal_distribution
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I wouldn't say that. A better explanation would be that you are more cautious. Every time i've seen it end sooner was when playing with people who did all-out attacks constantly.
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