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Subject: A great game and a scholarly work rss

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Judd Vance
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1777: The Year of the Hangman is unique for games covering the American Revolution in that it does not cover a single battle with the depth of the GMT series or the entire war (Washington's War). Instead, it covers the 1777 Philadelphia campaign covering a 3 month time period. Other games, such as 1776 and Give Me Liberty, are primarily designed to fight the entire war. Both have scenarios for this campaign, but at their heart, they are grand strategic games, and you use a portion of the map with stripped-down rules to play them. This game is dedicated to this campaign: map, rules, and playing pieces.






Details:

1777: The Year of the Hangman is a hex-and-counter war game for 2 players. The game has 12 scenarios along with the campaign game. Scenarios can take a few hours to play, whereas the campaign can take significantly longer. Ed Wimble designed it and Clash of Arms published it in 2002.


Background:

The game simulates the fall 1777 campaign staged by British General William Howe to take Philadelphia. It covers battles at Brandywine, Paoli, and Germantown, among other places. The map covers a portion of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Delaware.


Components:

This game comes with a 16-page 8.5” x 11” black-and-white rulebook. The only illustrations are the cover (see below) and the example counters. The layout of the rules is laid out chronologically to show the sequence and phases of a single game turn. As for the quality, I am somewhat mixed: this is a very cerebral game, so the rules are not going to be really easy. Some of the concepts I had to read and re-read to wrap my brain around, but I eventually figured out most of them. At the same time, there are two glaring rules issues that appear contradictory. I could not reconcile the issue and attempts to get the question answered as well as contacting the designer, have gone unanswered, so that can be a hindrance. But overall, with enough diligence, they make pretty good sense and contain designer notes, historical explanations, and plenty of examples.





The game comes with another book that contains historical background and scenarios setting up each battle, as well as the guidelines for the entire campaign.





The map is an attractive 22” x 34” full color paper map that displays the area with a numbered hexagonal grid laid over the map. From an aesthetic appearance, it a beautiful map. It’s a bit on the dark side, but it is easy to distinguish the terrain feature. If I have any complaints, it's that a) Some of the hex numbers are difficult to read (if it is in a forest), b) the towns are written upside down from the hex numbers, and c) the towns are written in a fancy font that makes it difficult to read (especially upside-down). These are minor gripes, though, as the beauty of the map more than makes up for it.





Finally, the map also includes the combat charts and various tracks.





The game includes 280 1/2" cardboard counters representing various leaders, units, and game markers. The counters are not as intuitive as the GMT series, but nevertheless, from an aesthetic appearance, they are gorgeous.





The game also includes a very useful sequence of play chart as well as counter-placement sheets that I will talk about later. The game could have used a couple of player aids, such as a shortcut/flow chart explain the complicated combat system as well as the replacement phase, which are both fairly in-depth, but from a production standpoint, this is a sharp game.


Objective of Play:

Each scenario has its own victory conditions. For the campaign game, the British player wins if George Washington is killed or captured or if the American’s overall morale value drops to negative 5, which represents the Conway Cabal (a group that tried to use political influence to replace Washington with the less able Horatio Gates). The American player wins if the overall American Morale value is greater than 5, which represents General Howe becoming so demoralized that he negotiates a settlement on his own. Any other result is an American victory, because they survived the losses during the campaign, survived the tough winter ahead at Valley Forge and came back with a better trained fighting force and a new powerful ally.


Overview of Play:

I will try to explain the game by breaking down a game turn.

1) Command Phase:

During the command phase, each side activates available units. The British have to place an “Action Chit” on a stack. They start with a certain number of them and acquire more through foraging or plundering. To receive an action chit, the stack has to be within so many uninterrupted hexes of the baggage train, which in turn must be within so many uninterrupted hexes of the supply depot. In addition, two action points may be spent to create a dragoon (cavalry) counter, as this represents acquiring mounts for the soldiers.

For the American player, any unit may move/attack if it is stacked with George Washington or is adjacent or can trace a path to him through a series of hexes each containing at least one unit.

2) Weather phase:

Next a die is rolled to determine weather conditions for the turn, which in turn affect movement and combat.

3) Initiative Test:

Both sides roll a die and apply modifiers to determine initiative. The British player may affect the roll by spending action chits. The Americans modify the roll based upon their overall army morale. The winner is considered the Initiating Player and the loser is considered the Reacting Player.

Off Board Army Display – Before I proceed, I must discuss one of the unique features of this game, the Off Board Army Display. The Display for each side shows a leaders name and a series of boxes. Stacking counters on the board is illegal, but only because all excess counters are placed on the display. You can have a lot of counters in a hex through the use of this display. (If you are familiar with Wilderness War or Give Me Liberty, the display is similar to the General's boxes that allow you to stack extra leaders and units in order to prevent cluttering up the board.) Except in this case, the displays are kept secret, so that the other player has no idea how many units (or what strength) are in a certain hex. The first unit placed beneath a General’s line on the display is considered the “top” of the stack and the last one is the “bottom.”





Generals can only control so many counters, but by controlling a subordinate general, he gets to control all of those counters, also, so long as he does not exceed his maximum command capacity, which varies between leaders. For example, British commander in Chief William Howe can command the entire British Army by controlling every general, and in this case, one Activation Chit activates the entire British Army. As a “stack” moves, it may drop off units or wings and absorb others.

George Washington, on the other hand, may only control 16 total units (including units controlled by subordinates), except for militia, which only count as 1 unit no matter how many there are, whereas Nathaniel Greene may only command 6 total units.

In addition, the “attack strength” of the counter only shows its maximum strength. If that unit is not at maximum strength, then a numbered counter is placed below it, showing how much of the strength the unit is lacking. For example, if a counter shows 7 as its maximum strength, yet has a “5” below it, that unit’s strength is actually 2. In some instances, you may have to reveal a counter, but not show its strength (meaning the numbered counter below it). The reason why so much of this game is hidden is because each side had limited ability to determine what the other side was doing: there was no radar and no reconnaissance planes and such. Therefore, to accurately model warfare back then, there has to be a higher degree of uncertainty, thus, the displays create an intense “Fog of War” experience.

4) First Pulse – Initiating Player.

Any British stack that has an Activation Chit on it or any “In Command” American unit may move and/or combat.

For units that did not receive an activation point, British units may attempt to forage the hex they are in by rolling a die on a chart and comparing it to the type of terrain in the hex. A success roll yields an additional Action Chit for later use. They may attempt to plunder an American store by placing 5 chits in a cup and drawing one, which results in a) nothing happens, b) add an Action Chit for later use, or c) American Morale may be decreased (and for added chrome, a table is rolled to explain why, such as finding American supplies, a signatory of the Declaration of Independence, a large cracked bell, etc.)

For “Out of Command” American units, one unit per day may receive orders from Washington, which has the same effect as being in-command. This represents Washington’s hand written orders. Also, an “Assembly Hex” is determined and all other out of command units may move toward this hex, but not engage the enemy in combat.

In addition, ships do not require an action chit, dragoons may roll against their morale in order to activate, and either side may entrench or improve their defensive works.

Leaders who are by themselves may move independently and may attempt to reconnoiter an enemy hex. On a roll of 1 (or 1-2 if the enemy has dragoons), the leader is captured. Otherwise, another die roll is made and the other player must reveal that many units, but not their strength.

For activated units that move, most standard war game movement rules apply, except that terrain modifiers are cumulative.

When a stack moves, a number of “Dummy Counters” are used. They are double sided. One side shows that nation's flag. The other side either says, “False Column” or “Obscured Column.” (Because the British were superior at employing loyalists, traitors, and spies, they receive more Dummy Counters in order to throw off their opponent.) These counters are then moved according to standard war game movement rules (the only possible exception being that terrain modifiers are cumulative) and Dummy Columns may not move adjacent to an enemy.
In addition to standard movement rules, the Obscured Column may attempt to “Brush Aside” opponents in their way, which is a fancy way of saying “enter the same hex as the opponent.”

To attempt a Brush Aside, the moving force plays a Probe Chit while the defender plays either a Skirmish or Escalate chit. If a Skirmish Chit was played, combat is carried out between the top unit on each stack (as per the display). If the defender does not inflict heavier losses, then his stack must retreat, and the moving player may move his stack into the hex for an additional movement point.

If the defender selected the Escalate Chit, they must conduct as many rounds of combat as the smaller side has units. For example, if one side has 6 units and the other has 4, then they will fight 4 rounds. They will wage combat between their respective first unit shown on the display. Then, they will add their second unit and conduct another round of combat between the two pieces, then between 3 pieces each, and then 4. (Hang with me: combat results are not as simple as attacker retreat, exchange, defender eliminated, and such that you are used to seeing in war games). The side that runs out of units yields the hex.

If a unit successfully Brushes Aside a defender, after the defender retreats, the attacker may attempt to Brush Aside the defender's stack if he has enough movement points to do so.

If a unit ends its movement adjacent to an enemy, but without the required movement points needed to enter the hex (and attempt a Brush Aside), then standard combat is an option. To do so, the attacking player secretly selects either a Probe or Assault chit while the defender simultaneously selects a Skirmish or Defend chit, unless the defending force is composed entirely of militia, and then it is selected blindly, in order to mimic the unpredictability of militia commanders.

The combination produces different results:

Probe vs. Skirmish (top units only fight) was mentioned earlier in the Brush Aside description.

Assault vs. Skirmish results in a defender retreat and attacker advance.

Probe vs. Defend causes no combat. The defender reveals his top unit, but not its strength (or should I say the losses beneath it).

Assault vs. Defend – COMBAT!!!





What sets this game apart is its combat system (along with the column & display rules). The trick to American Revolution games is to model the results, which were low casualties that were often won or lost based on the morale of the troops.

To conduct combat, you first determine the morale-based die roll modifier by summing the morale for each side, subtracting the difference, dividing this result by the number of units on the side with more morale, and rounding down to the nearest whole number. Then add or subtract any other modifiers, such as terrain. Next, you ratio the combat strength of each side, as per standard war game rules, roll the die, apply the modifiers and determine the result from the combat results table. The results are not your typical “Attacker Eliminated”, “Defender Retreat”, and “Exchange” that you see in many games. Instead, the results are two numbers separated by a slash (ex: 10/15). This represents the percentages of total strength points lost by each side (a table is included for the mathematically-challenged). Starting with the top unit of the stack, one point (counter) is placed under each unit until all of the points are used. It is important to understand that this is not necessarily casualties that cause this number. It is a combination of battlefield casualties as well as battlefield deserters. The total points are added to a “Straggler Index” track on the map for use during the Reorganization Phase. If you lost 5 strength points from units, your straggler index would increase by 5 and during the Reorganization Phase at the end of the turn, most of these will return to their units, and a percentage will be permanently eliminated (due to casualties and permanent desertion).

If the initial morale-based die roll modifier favored the attacker, he may engage in an additional number of rounds of combat equivalent to that number (if his modifier was 2, he may engage in up to three rounds of combat), repeating the combat procedure for each round.

After each round of combat, each unit involved makes a morale check by rolling a die, applying terrain-based die roll modifiers (defenders only) and comparing it to that unit’s specific morale value. For an added level of chrome, George Washington may make an “Appeal to Valor” to one unit in that force. The result will either be a favorable die roll modifier (to the morale check) of +1 or +2, or no modifier. An additional die roll is made and on the result of 1, roll against a table to see if Washington is killed, captured, wounded (possibly missing turns), or stunned (moved to the Assembly Hex). Nathaniel Greene and Anthony Wayne may also make an Appeal to Valor to the top unit in their respective stacks, but the rewards are not as great, but they also do not risk becoming a casualty.

Units that fail the morale check are “Shaken.” Shaken defensive units retreat out of the hex. Shaken attacking units remain in the hex. Shaken units may not contribute their strength values to combat odds calculations nor may they contribute their morale to the morale die roll modifier calculation. However, attacking shaken units still receive losses. A shaken attacking unit that passes its next round of morale check are no longer shaken. If all defending units retreat due to being shaken, the attacking player may advance all of his unshaken units into the vacated hex and if he had at least one more rounds coming to him (as a result of the initial morale-based die roll modifier), he may renew the attack against the hex that the defending force retreated into.

Units whose strength value fall to zero or are unable to make a legal retreat become “Shattered.” Shattered units affect American Morale (overall morale, not specific unit morale). If the unit can trace a legal route to its supply depot, a certain value, based on that specific unit’s morale may be used as replacements. Otherwise, it surrenders, creating additional movement to the overall American Morale.

5) Reaction Phase – Non-Initiating Player.

The initiating player removes his opponent's Dummy Column counters and then the non-initiating player then gets his chance to move and/or attack.

6) Second Pulse – Initiating Player.

The non-initiating player removes his opponent's Dummy Column counters, and then a limited round is conducted. Any British stack that received two action chits may also move and/or attack during this phase. There are restrictions, such as no attempts to entrench and certain units may not move.

7) Second Pulse – Non-Initiating Player.

Step 6 is repeated for the non-initiating player.

8) Reorganization Phase

During this phase, shaken units attempt another morale test. Replacement points are used to improve the strength of units that have taken losses (in other words, remove a point from the replacement pool track and change the number underneath a unit on the Display).

Shattered units that retreated to the supply depot either return to the game or move one step closer to returning.

Finally, the “Straggler Index” track for both sides is used to determine future replacement points. The combat results table is used again (using 1:1 odds and shifting columns based on American overall morale), and the percentage losses are applied to each player's Straggler Index value. The remaining numbers are transferred to the replacement pool for further use. In other words, the “losses” in combat were mostly due to participants leaving the battlefield. Some return, while the “losses” are the real losses due to death and desertion.


Results:

As you can tell by this review, you need two players to enjoy this game in its full glory. It has zero solitaire suitability. On top of that, because it is a bit unconventional, I would think one of the players should be experienced. Because it doesn't have a VASSAL module, I am unable to play it against another player. I did sit down and play a little bit with an introductory scenario, trying out concepts like combat, but even getting past the part of not having the necessary fog of war to appreciate the game fully, I felt like I was still missing something. And with so little online support, that is a big hurdle for this game to overcome.

Still, at the same time, there are parts of the mechanics that can really get you jazzed up if you love to study this war.

From the looks of it, combined with the mechanics, the campaign appears to be great. It's the right size and scale for such an event. As far as individual battles by themselves, the game is a bit flat. Because it is played at a larger scale (campaign), the individual battles are somewhat conceptualized, so you don't get the tactical feel. You just roll the dice and remove numbers. Therefore, the campaign is orders of magnitude better than the individual scenarios, which I found a bit lacking.


Conclusion:

1777: The Year of the Hangman is almost as much a scholarly work as a game. The way the designer captures concepts such as combat losses and supply is truly astounding to a fan of that time period and these same fans will enjoy the chrome.

I find it vastly superior to its contemporaries at capturing the campaign for which it was designed. That is because those games vaguely conceptualize the campaign, whereas this one focuses on it. At the same time, this game vaguely conceptualizes individual battles, whereas the GMT series focuses on them.

It this time period (American Revolution) and scale (major campaign) fit your niche, then this game is for you, so long as you have somebody to play it with. If opponents are a problem or you want a smaller or broader focus, then this one will not satisfy.

I can tell that there is a really great game inside of this box. I need more help pulling it out and appreciating it for all it has to offer. If I could get some actual playing time with an opponent, I can see this game easily achieving a 9 rating. But if a publisher knows that a game cannot be played solitaire and it is covering a less popular war, where opponents are more difficult to find, I believe it is up the publisher to support that game with a VASSAL module, and that all games should have sufficient online support. This is the total package that makes up the gaming experience, so based on that, I'll rate it an 8.

Edit: Remove your opponent's Dummy markers.
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Paul Borchers
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Great review!

What were the rules contradictions that you mentioned? The discussion board for this game on Consimworld has seen a number of rule clarifications over the years, which in turn have been posted in a large document on the Web Grognards site. If you were able to post your questions on CSW, you'd stand a better chance of getting an answer from Ed.

It's been a while, but Ed has also mentioned making a companion to this game which would link up to it and expand the area to include New York City. The goal would be to play the campaigns in these areas from 1776 through 1778 - Howe's attack on New York, the advance into New Jersay, the actions covered in this game, and then Clinton's retreat back to New York (and the battle on Monmouth along the way).
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Judd Vance
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Thanks!

I set up the "Ten Crucial Days" scenario and messed around with applying the concepts, such as movement, combat, and replacements. I ran into a problem in the set-up that appears to be a direct contradiction to the rules and that is the part that prohibits stacking. The British set up the depot at Princeton and a combat unit and another unit with a note to set up that 2nd combat unit in an adjacent hex. Still, there is a depot and combat unit stacked in Princeton, creating a stacking violation. I'm guessing depots aren't considered units for stacking, but the rules should clarify.

That one was pretty easy to figure out. But then Ewing is stacked with two militia units, and no note about adjacent hexes. They are all set up in the same hex. Ewing is not included on the American OBAD, so this creates a big conflict in the rules.

I had a few nitpicks about the scenario itself, although more from a historical perspective than any rules conflicts or the game's mechanics: first, there should be a stipulation in the scenario that says you don't dice for initiative on December 26, since Washington caught them completely off guard. If the British win initiative, then the Hessians can entrench, when in reality, Rall refused to improve his defensive position in the time leading up to the Battle of Trenton. That's a small point and is easily fixed in a house rule. Also, when Washington attacks Trenton, he has 7 attack points in his column and Rall has 7 in his, but in reality, Washington outnumbered them by a 5:3 ratio in men and 3 times as many guns. He gets a +1 DRM in morale, but that is offset by the Hessians +1 in defensive terrain. That means you are firing on the 1:1 table with no DRMs, meaning you need a lucky die roll to win and then you only get one more round of combat. I don't believe Washington's force had enough movement points to surround the city, especially if your weather roll mirrors the actual weather of 12/26/76. If he did have enough (I could be wrong, since I'm going by memory), then the only way to replicate the historical results of the battle is to get lucky in those two rounds of combat and hope the Hessians fail every morale check. It seemed like a poor simulation of the battle, but not by any fault of the mechanics, but rather the scenario set-up.

So I ran into one apparent rules contradiction (stacking), a scenario flaw, and one part that just plain doesn't make a lot of sense, and that involves the dummy column counters, and with this one, I figure I am missing something.

Dummy columns may not move adjacent to any enemy units. So if you see a hidden counter do this, you know it's not a dummy column. Likewise if you see a hidden counter drop off a unit or absorb a stray unit into its column, then you know it's a real column. Then, to top it off, you place the hidden counters at the start of your pulse and remove them at the end of your pulse. There is no enemy reactionary movement during your movement (like Give Me Liberty) and no opportunity fire (this game's scale and time period prevents that). It doesn't make a lot of sense: your opponent knows where your columns are at the start of the turn and at at the end of the turn, and cannot do anything about the in-between, so what's the point in trying to hide this information?

Because of this game, I actually decided to go create a CSW account. After reading a few posts here on BGG on maneuvering around CSW (isn't that sad that you have to learn this from BGG?) and stumbling around for 30 minutes, I finally found the 1777 forum. I tried to post my question and they wanted $18. I'm not cheap: I'm all about supporting a good website (see my patron badge), but I don't want to throw good money after a bad proposition. I can get almost all of my game questions answered here on BGG. So for the forseeable future, I'm spending $18 to try to resolve question for a game that I can't play. I don't even know how active that forum is (they wanted money to subscribe). I sent a friend request to Ed and explained my newbie-ness to CSW and was hoping to get a rules clarification, but never heard back, which makes me wonder how active he is on that forum. If CSW had a lot more to offer than BGG, I'd be for spending the money, but it's so hard to maneuver around that site, it's like going shopping for a house, visiting it during a power outage without a flashlight and then being asked by the Realtor, "So ... do you want to buy it? Ready to sign the paperwork?"

I was hoping by our respective 5th microbadges that you might live in the Lawrence area and we could hook up for a game, but Texas is quite a drive from Wichita. soblue
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Paul Borchers
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Ed is pretty active on the discussion board part of CSW (I don't know about the "social" part). He occasionally checks in here, so I could alert him to your review.

It's been a long time since I've played, so I can't answer all your questions without some homework. When I played the Ten Crucial Days with an opponent, he showed me how to bag Rall without any difficulty. He had just enough MP to drop off units around Rall. Then, the gunboats moved up and caused Rall to surrender (which is not ahistorical, as boats had been shelling Trenton off and on the before that point). My memory was the scenario was won or lost after that point, as Washington had to inflict enough damage on the rest of the Brits and then escape. The Brits narrowly lost in the game I played.

There's a note in the Rebel deployment that says they have the initiative throughout the first turn, so Rall can't escape.

I'm in the Fort Worth area, so that's still a little far for a game (about a five and a half hour drive).
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Edward Hoden
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Thought I would respond to a few things I had thoughts on ...

Quote:
But then Ewing is stacked with two militia units, and no note about adjacent hexes. They are all set up in the same hex. Ewing is not included on the American OBAD, so this creates a big conflict in the rules.


I think this is actually an oversight rather than a true contradiction. The OAB was designed for the campaign game and not for the Ten Crucial Days scenario. I work under the assumption that the Armstrong line (Pennsylvania Militia) is for Ewing and the Newcomb line (New Jersey Militia) is for Griffin.

Quote:
I don't believe Washington's force had enough movement points to surround the city, especially if your weather roll mirrors the actual weather of 12/26/76.


If you check out my own review (and sorry that I had to pull down my images) and Ed Wimble's comments, it is possible through the use of boats and detaching Bland's dragoons to close off the far road. However, you are correct in that it does take some good dice rolls to get the historical surrender. However, I distinctly recall outnumbering the Brits 2/1 and not the 1/1 ratio you mentioned.

Quote:
Then, to top it off, you place the hidden counters at the start of your pulse and remove them at the end of your pulse.


This is where you misread the rules. It is the opposing player's hidden counters that are removed at the end of movement. Not your own. Check out my rules post for more detail.

HTH!
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Judd Vance
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Ahhhh!!! Thanks so much! As I first read the Dummy columns, I thought, "This is soooo coool!!!" Mayhem! Confusion! Perfect!!!

Now with the clarification, it's as perfect as I originally thought.

The 1:1 was based only on Washington's stack attacking Rall's. I kept staring at the board at Ewing's column (when not utterly confused how 3 militia units could be stacked) thinking that giving Ewing the orders was the only way to make the historical surrender happen. The problem was a) You cannot attack across a ferry (and I assume that includes a Brush aside) and B) Ewing wasn't able to cross the Delaware in the actual battle.

Games like this and Turning Point made me wish I could figure out how to program VASSAL modules. Either that or figure out how to clone myself.
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Paul Borchers
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An ADC module did exist for this one. I'll need to learn how to use VASSAL, but I don't like playing games on the computer that much.
 
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Mike Owens
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There is also a Cyberboard module, here in the files section.
 
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Edward Hoden
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MikeO wrote:
There is also a Cyberboard module, here in the files section.


Unfortunately, the version here on BGG is not complete. The file was too big to upload all in one piece and so I uploaded multiple zipped files that had to be restored to a single file before being posted. I mentioned this in my note to the moderators but I am afraid that part of the instructions got missed.

You can find the complete Cyberboard gamebox here...

http://loakes.game-host.org/limeyyankgames/games/gameboxes/1...
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Steve Herron
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Super good job on the review. I always thought CoA had some of the best art work on their maps. I couldn't help seeing The Turn Record Spiral on the map, not many games (if any?) have them.
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Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
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Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
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Excellent review that has made me reconsider my interest in this game.

Have you played any of Kevin Zucker's operational Napoleonic wargames? If so, how do they stack up to this title?
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Judd Vance
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gittes wrote:
Excellent review that has made me reconsider my interest in this game.

Have you played any of Kevin Zucker's operational Napoleonic wargames? If so, how do they stack up to this title?


Sadly, I have never played a Napoleonic game and my knowledge of it can fit in a thimble. Do you have any open seats in your class?

I tried the Cyberboard module for this game in the files section a month ago. Since I never tried it, I figured it was too difficult to understand. But now that I found out the module is messed up, I'm anxious to try it out. Maybe I actually can get in a game, after all.
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Sean Chick (Formerly Paul O'Sullivan)
United States
New Orleans
Louisiana
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Fag an bealac! Riam nar druid ar sbarin lann! Cuimhnigidh ar Luimnech agus feall na Sassonach! Erin go Bragh! Remember Limerick! Remember Ireland and Fontenoy!
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Well, I'm afraid it'll have to wait. Whatever it was, I'm sure it was better than my plan to get out of this by pretending to be mad. I mean, who would have noticed another madman round here?
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Sadly, I have never played a Napoleonic game and my knowledge of it can fit in a thimble. Do you have any open seats in your class?


Whenever I write my bug Napoleon geeklist I'll contact you.

Until them , check these out:
http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/38505/napoleons-comman...

http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/52887/napoleons-comman...
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Severus Snape
Canada
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Pascal said, "The eternal silence of these infinite spaces terrifies me."
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"The heart has its reasons which reason knows nothing of."--Pascal
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I haven't played this in a few years and miss it. I asked Ed Wimble many a question on the Consim forum which he patiently answered. As I recall, there are a few house rules needed to clean up the game, but only one thing comes to mind at the moment and that is the 1 SP units. The rules, as written, do not allow you to kill them off, no matter how high the odds against them. Ed recognizes the problem, but I am not sure if he resolved the issue. I figure that if you at least surround the little buggers, they must die.

I wish Ed would continue the series, north and south, and create a grande campaign game.

1777 is the best operational AWI game along with Tarleton's Quarter.

goo

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Patrick O'Halloran
United States
Asbury Park
New Jersey
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runiago wrote:
MikeO wrote:
There is also a Cyberboard module, here in the files section.


Unfortunately, the version here on BGG is not complete. The file was too big to upload all in one piece and so I uploaded multiple zipped files that had to be restored to a single file before being posted. I mentioned this in my note to the moderators but I am afraid that part of the instructions got missed.

You can find the complete Cyberboard gamebox here...

http://loakes.game-host.org/limeyyankgames/games/gameboxes/1...


There is also a ADC2 Module which is rather easy to import into VASSAL. Import the ADC2 Module from here:
http://hkl.hpssims.com/COA/coa.htm

Open VASSAL and go to files-> import -> and select a file with a "OPS" suffix. Then you can save it in a VASSAL format and reopen the new VASSAL module. I too am enamored by this game but have no face to face opponents. If anybody is able to get this up and running, drop me a note. However, I am a nooby as I have not anybody to play and still haven't grasped the nuances of the rules yet.

P.S. Thanks for the review Judd!
 
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