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Subject: A Deck Building Adventure rss

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Jesse Dean
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Mage Knight the Board Game, by Vlaada Chvatil, is Wizkids fantasy adventure game based off their defunct collectible miniatures game (CMG). In the past, Wizkids was fairly uninvolved in the board game market, instead producing CMGs and CCGs based on a variety of works, both licensed and otherwise. They published a 2005 release, Tsuro, but most of their other releases were focused on different markets entirely. That has changed dramatically in 2011, with the release of Quarriors!, Star Trek: Expeditions, Star Trek: Fleet Captains, and now Mage Knight the Board Game. Given the style of their releases so far, it appears that Wizkids is seeking to challenge FFG’s particular focus on thematic and licensed products. Their mix of well-regarded designers and established properties has created a great deal of excitement, though I admit I have thus far not been very susceptible to their charms. I tried Quarriors but did not find it worth owning, and my indifference to the Star Trek series kept me from bothering to try out either of their other games. I initially ignored Mage Knight for similar reasons but enthusiasm from gamers whose opinions I trust was enough that I took a look at the rules. What I found was fascinating.



Components
For a fantasy adventure game of this scope, I found the relatively small number of individual components to be refreshing. Items that would typically have their own tokens and thus take a bit of space, like spells and artifacts, are instead included as cards in the player’s deck, which takes up only a bare minimum of space. There are tokens used to represent the character’s skills and monsters, but there are few enough categories that it is easy enough to keep them organized without having to resort to any outside cups or containers. I find this to be pretty admirable, especially considering the amount of components needed by many other games of this style. This is not to say that you can play Mage Knight on a small table. As the game progresses, and the map is built the amount of space the game takes up will greatly increase until it could very well end up covering a dining room table.



With one glaring exception I found the components very easy to distinguish and decipher, despite my red-green colorblindness. Pretty much everything that has a color identifier also has an associated symbol, resulting in plenty of options for visually impaired individuals to identify what, exactly they are selecting. Unfortunately, the red and green plastic crystals that are used to identify that type of stored mana are virtually indistinguishable, for those of us with color differentiation issues, resulting in frequent game slowdowns for clarification.

The insert, meant for keeping things organized is fairly ineffective, and I found at BGG.Con that boxes where the insert was thrown out in favor of plastic bags tended to be a lot easier to set-up and break down. In fact, in boxes where the insert was kept I frequently found the game parts had been scattered around in the process of carrying it. This may not be a big deal if you only intend to play Mage Knight in the home, but if you are likely to bring it to someone else’s house or a game night, then you probably want to find a more secure way to pack the game.



The game comes with four pre-painted plastic figures. While the quality of the paint job is not exceptional by any stretch of the imagination, I found it to be good enough, particularly coming from a mass-produced game. I would recommend caution when removing the figures from the insert, however, as the leg-base connection appears to be fragile enough that it could cause damage to the figure if you do not remove them delicately.



The game’s player aids are generally very good. There are reference cards that allow you to easily look up the effects of a particular location type, and the day/night boards also serve to remind you what movement costs are for particular terrains. Things like monster distributions and special abilities are on the back of the two rulebooks, meaning that it is very easy to find this information during play without having to search through the book. The only thing that I regret is that they did not include scenario cards, so that it is easy to find out what separates the scenario you are playing from other options. Looking up scenario details ended up being the item that required the most rules references after the initial plays, and having cards available for each of them would help facilitate smooth play.

Theme and Setting
Mage Knight the Board Game is supposedly set in the same world as the Mage Knight Collectible Miniatures Game (CMG). I do not know very much about that setting as my CMG interests tended to be focused on the Dungeons & Dragons Miniatures Game and Dreamblade, but the setting is generic enough that it is pretty easy to get into the game regardless of your familiarity with the source material. Based on some of the complaints I have seen from fans of the original game, it seems that the designer or publisher may have pushed the game too far away for fans of the game. I am sympathetic to this complaint, but theme and setting have always been secondary concerns to me. I appreciate a well-implement theme, but only if it does not get in the way of the game play.

Fortuitously enough, Mage Knight features an excellent synchronization between game play and theme such that the game provides a much richer experience than I am used to getting out of fantasy board games. Chvatil has done an excellent job in ensuring that the mechanical foundation of the game serves the theme and vice versa. The setting has the haunted groves, deep dungeons, fearsome tombs, secluded monasteries, and the like that you would expect from a game based around fantasy adventures. More advanced locations definitely feel more fearsome, and even more powerful adventures are likely to pause before exploring a dragon-infested ruin. It is way too easy for such a creature to ruin a character’s day to risk it unless you are sure you will win.

Additionally, Mage Knight does an excellent job of providing the feel of steady progression you expect from a heroic adventure story or game. Even at the beginning it is obvious that you are a cut above the individuals around you, as you are able to cross vast distances and perform the sorts of deeds that a normal mortal would not even dream of being able to perform in a single day or night. As the game advances situations that would have been difficult for your character become increasingly trivial; rampaging orcs that were fierce opponents become a quick and easy way to prove your mettle and good intentions, while it becomes possible to challenge dragons and prevail if the situation favors you.

Mage Knight gives you opportunities to try to decide what sort of individual your character is. Villages and monasteries dot the landscape and allow characters to have positive, mutually beneficial relationships, but also provide opportunities for more unscrupulous characters, allowing for them to burn and plunder in exchange for minor hits to reputation. What makes this particularly interesting is that reputation is not one of the items that are scored at the end, making it so characters that follow a particularly immoral path are not punished for it beyond in their reduced capability to gain followers or learn advanced actions from those locations that provide them. So there are consequences to your character’s actions, but they are not necessarily going to be what determines if you win or lose. You can have your mage knight be a paragon of virtue or an anti-hero who burns down monasteries and sacks villages but also defeats monsters who threaten the land. The fact that this decision is available and what it implies about the setting you are in is fairly fascinating, particularly since many other adventure games directly encourage heroism or anti-heroism whereas Mage Knight accommodates both.



Deck Building
One of the more significant developments of 2011 has been the increased distinctiveness of deck building games. Most previous releases in this family were largely refinements of the model established by Dominion to the point where they were described by some as Dominion games rather than true deck building games. This has now changed, with Eminent Domain successfully moving beyond this model within the traditional complex card game structure, while A Few Acres of Snow and Mage Knight integrated deck building into entirely new genres: area control and adventure. I consider Mage Knight to be both the strongest of this new wave of deck building games and perhaps the best deck building game released up to this point.

With the exception of Puzzle Strike, I have found most previous deck-building games to be rather lackluster. Building an economic snowball for the sake of building an economic snowball is something that I rarely find to be satisfying, and while the particulars vary, that is essentially what you are doing in games like Ascension, Dominion, Eminent Domain, and Thunderstone. Puzzle Strike stands apart from other entrants in that, while its base system is very close to that of Dominion’s, its ultimate focus is on forcing the other players to lose rather than to gain any particular victory point reward. Of course, I have lost a lot of interested in Puzzle Strike too, as I’ve realized that as far as complex card games go, I tend to prefer those that are more focused on building a tableau; my favorites include Race For the Galaxy, Innovation, and Glory to Rome.

So what makes Mage Knight different from other deck builders? The biggest part of it is that the deck building is simply a major feature of the game, rather than being the game. Almost every card you add to your deck relates to how you interact with the board and your adventures. There are cards that simply affect other cards, but these are in the minority and tend to still be strongly thematic. This thematic integration works both ways too, as most every way you enhance or degrade your character has direct effect on the composition of your deck. Learning new spells or advanced actions, or discovering an artifact for successfully looting a dungeon results in new cards being added to your deck as does being wounded in a fight. As interesting things happen to your hero your deck grows and changes, serving as a reflection of their dynamism as a hero. Every time you draw one of these new cards it reminds you of something you accomplished, of a monster you slew or of a successful negotiation at a monastery or wizard’s tower. No other deck-building game, not even the widely lauded A Few Acres of Snow, shares this sense of accomplishment and dynamism.



Mage Knight is further differentiated from other deck-builders in that each card provides multiple functions, allowing for an additional level of flexibility in how you play your hand. Each card has two different level of capability, with the second level being activated by using mana. Any card, save for wounds, can also be discarded in order to give a +1 bonus in one of a variety of areas, meaning that even if you do not completely draw the cards you need, you still have options, you just might not like them all. Further control is gained in the fact that, unlike many other deck-building games, you have the ability to keep unplayed cards in your hand between turns, allowing you to have more opportunities to build a hand that suits your particular needs. Of course, this does not change the fact that your capabilities are driven by your drawn cards, and those who prefer to play games where you have full control over your character’s capabilities are probably not going to like this game.

Chaos, Luck, and Analysis Paralysis
As can be expected in this sort of game, luck has a reasonably large impact on how the game develops. How the map looks, what monsters you face, and what rewards are available are all randomized, and change between rounds meaning both that you are guaranteed a fairly different play experience and that there is potential for these random selections to have an impact on play. Unlike other games of this style, most of the luck is not the sort that prevents planning when it is not your turn. How far you can move, how much damage you can do, and what type of attacks you can perform are all largely determined at the end of your turn, before all of your opponents are able to go.



Where luck does have an impact is in determining what you are dealing with and what is available as a reward. As an adventure game, a reasonable part of Mage Knight is exploring the world. While a particular seeded set of tiles is available, you will seldom know the contents of a particular tile before it is flipped over. This is good in many respects because it adds to its overall variability, due to the increased challenge provided from determining how to best deal with particular map configurations. However, with this variability there is a chance that a particular tile will end up favoring you more or less than the tiles your opponents reveal. I find this to be a net positive, as a large part of the base game is about dealing with systematic, as opposed to player-driven, challenges and this variability provides more systematic challenges. Less favorable tile draws can increase the overall game difficulty, but will also frequently provide opportunities for clever play.

Player-driven chaos also impacts the overall interplay variability of the game, while at the same time increasing the play time as it disrupts an individual’s ability to plan for their next turn. This can be reduced by choosing the right scenario, and can additionally be reduced by making specific choices during play. There is a much greater chance that your ability to plan for a future turn will be reduced if you end up in the same general area as another player than there would be if you end up pushing the map in a direction that your opponents are not exploring. Of course in doing so you are also putting the game more in the hands of chance. If you are luckier in your explorations then your opponents, then you might be able to pull ahead of them, but the inverse is also true; exploring in the same area increases the potential for interference but also reduces the likelihood that you won’t be able to take advantage of locations your opponent discovers. Of course this indirect competition for choice sites may not result in a direct enough level of interaction. This can be remedied by playing one of the scenarios that is “very competitive” (allows player vs. player combat) but the resulting level of chaos may be too much. I am not quite sure which level of player chaos will be too much for me, and I look forward to exploring some of these very competitive scenarios once I have a group of experienced, fast players, to find out.

Because of the complexity in determining what do with a particular hand of cards there is a great potential for players who are “deep thinkers” to ratchet up the play time of the game. Unlike other deck building games where the complexity of what you can do with your hand is pretty limited, the startling array of options provided by Mage Knight means that it is very easy to get sucked into thinking through potential alternatives and drive the play time ever upwards. If you are playing with individuals who have those habits, you will have to come to terms with the fact that your plays are going to last significantly longer than the expected play time. This can be mitigated by playing with only two or three players, playing only the shorter scenarios, and staying away from very competitive scenarios. This probably won’t completely eliminate the potential for extremely long plays, but should at least reduce their impact.

Part of my enjoyment of my plays up to this point has come from the fact that I was playing with fairly brisk opponents. By the time we hit are fourth or fifth games of the conventions, and had moved past the introductory scenario, games were moving at a brisk pace, and even the three player medium-length scenarios were being finish in under three hours. So I know that the play time listed on the box is very reachable, assuming you can find the right group.





Expandability
One thing that is particularly noteworthy about Mage Knight is the relative ease at which scenarios can be created. This means that even without an eventual expansion, there are tons of possibilities for the community to create new avenues of exploration within the game. While this sort of thing was certainly possible with previous adventure games, as can be seen by the large amount of fan content for games such as Arkham Horror, they required significantly more effort than Mage Knight. I fully expect that if Mage Knight does well that we will start seeing a plethora of interesting scenarios as players seek to push the limits of the experience that Mage Knight has to offer.

Similarly, I can see a lot of potential for more traditional expansions to be applied to the game. While I am by no means already tired of playing the game with four base heroes, I would love to see what Vlaada could come up with for characters that specialize in additional aspects of the system. Similarly, it seems like the game would be enhanced by adding a few more types of locations and the world tiles that go with them. I admit I am a bit more hesitant about adding spells and advanced actions. It seems that the balance the game currently has between extra movement capabilities, extra combat capabilities, and miscellaneous abilities is very good right now, and with an increased amount of cards in the deck there is a better chance to see odd results. Of course, this is a pretty minor concern, and if a perspective expansion comes out with more of these items then I will certainly not complain.

Even if neither of these situations occurred, I think there is plenty of replay value just in the box. Figuring out what to do with a particular hand and how to build a deck to take advantage of the scenario, board, and your hero’s particular is engaging enough that I could easily see Mage Knight the Board Game topping 50 or 60 plays for me. It also appears to be a game that rewards an investment in both time and energy, and will become extremely rewarding only once you start to understand the nuances of how the game’s various subsystems interact with each other. Even at seven plays I feel that I’ve only begun to scratch the surface of what is a “good” or “bad” move and the opportunity to explore this more thoroughly is something that I am looking forward to.



Conclusion
I quite like Mage Knight the Board Game. While I am not a huge fan of either adventure board games or deck building games, Mage Knight manages to transcend both genres in such a way that I can’t help be fascinated with it. Even with seven plays over the course of five days I have a strong desire to play this often, and I expect it will consume quite a bit of table time in the next year. If you like deck building games for their ease and simplicity then you will probably want to avoid Mage Knight. However, if you like the idea of a meatier, more complicated deck building game, enjoy heavier adventure games, enjoy the designs of Vlaada Chvatil, or simply like effective, innovative designs than I can pretty strongly recommend Mage Knight. This is a game that I suspect will be doing very, very well for Wizkids both critically and commercially.
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Zolle
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Excellent review.

Very helpful, thanks!

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A very thorough and excellent review, thank you.

The only downside being that it is not yet available in Australia and your review has moved it up a couple of notches on my wishlist.
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Geoff Hall
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I was already very interested in this due to Paul's preview threads and the good (if limited) reception that it has received post-Essen. Your review has reaffirmed my desire to buy the game, a fact for which my wallet curses you.
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M.J.E. Hendriks
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Awesome review - couldn't have put it any better!
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Matt Tonks
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Jesse,

Thanks for this; I have Mage Knight as a Xmas gift from a relative - I had not read too much about it before ordering it, so it is very encouraging to know that you seem to really rate it.

So I am looking forward to getting it officially soon !

Have some GG on me.

Matt...
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Holger Hannemann
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Thanks for this outstanding review!

I have to agree with you about deck building games in general: Dominion is still a fine game but deck building/unbuilding is a fantastic mechanism to picture slow changes over time, e.g. of a character like in Mage Knight or of available funds, options and armies in A Few Acres Of Snow.
I guess if Mage Knight does well we won't have to wait long until we see the first deck-building pure RPG out there, completely lacking dice.

Cheers
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Fantastic job with the review. Thank you. GG for you!
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Tim Seitz
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Like water spilled on the ground, which cannot be recovered, so we must die. But God does not take away life; instead, he devises ways so that a banished person may not remain estranged from him. 2 Sam 14:14
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All you had to say in this review was "Vlaada"!
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Jeremy Scranton
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Great review! I can't wait until my copy comes into my FLGS.

Edit: It came in today. Counting down the hours until the end of work to go pick it up.
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Jesse Dean
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Pound for pound, the amoeba is the most vicious predator on Earth!
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Does that surprise you?
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Jason Reid
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Quote:
Similarly, I can see a lot of potential for more traditional expansions to be applied to the game. While I am by no means already tired of playing the game with four base heroes, I would love to see what Vlaada could come up with for characters that specialize in additional aspects of the system. Similarly, it seems like the game would be enhanced by adding a few more types of locations and the world tiles that go with them.

I'd also like to see more unit variety, though that may fall into the balance area that you're concerned about.

And quests! Though those could possibly be arranged entirely through scenarios.

And some sort of increased punishment for burning down monasteries. whistle
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Paul Lister
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Thanks for another great review Jesse
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Peter Jackson
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Thanks for an absolutely excellent review.

My copy is in the post somewhere, I'm now even more excited about receiving it! Come on postie!!
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Jon Day
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red black wrote:
You're one of the few people I've come across to rate Mage Knight higher than War of the Rings.

You're not looking very hard!

A great review Jesse and a great game.
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Jesse Dean
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jasonwocky wrote:

I'd also like to see more unit variety, though that may fall into the balance area that you're concerned about.

And quests! Though those could possibly be arranged entirely through scenarios.

And some sort of increased punishment for burning down monasteries. whistle

Yes, though I would not mind for additional unit categories.

Quests would be cool!

Its not my fault that those monasteries are refusing to give me their magical treasures. If they would just give me their artifacts then I wouldn't be forced to burn them down. Though I do have to admit that burning down monasteries does wonders for my blood pressure...

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Jesse Dean
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red black wrote:

No, does it have to do with the degree of luck involved in these games?

No. I like the adventure game aspects of Mage Knight better than those of the War of the Ring, and while the merging of them with a war game was clever in WotR I didn't find it as satisfying as either Mage Knight or other war games I've played. Thus I sold it.
 
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Jesse Dean
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tonksey wrote:
Jesse,

Thanks for this; I have Mage Knight as a Xmas gift from a relative - I had not read too much about it before ordering it, so it is very encouraging to know that you seem to really rate it.

So I am looking forward to getting it officially soon !

Have some GG on me.

Matt...

Matt,

I have every expectation that you will love this one. I played my newly released copy last night three times!

Though I did discover another component complaint in the proccess.
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Jesse Dean
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The MatrixCube wrote:
Thanks for this outstanding review!

I have to agree with you about deck building games in general: Dominion is still a fine game but deck building/unbuilding is a fantastic mechanism to picture slow changes over time, e.g. of a character like in Mage Knight or of available funds, options and armies in A Few Acres Of Snow.
I guess if Mage Knight does well we won't have to wait long until we see the first deck-building pure RPG out there, completely lacking dice.

Cheers

Even though I am not into RPGs anymore, I have to agree that that would be pretty interesting.

I do wonder what designers are going to do with deck building next. After having completely written it off based on previous designs, it is clear that there are some pretty interesting things you can do with it still. It is just a matter of where it goes next...
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Matt Tonks
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doubtofbuddha wrote:

Matt,

I have every expectation that you will love this one. I played my newly released copy last night three times!

Though I did discover another component complaint in the proccess.

Oh, what was that?

I did meant to ask what you thought of the quality of the land tiles & cards were like?

Glad to hear you are enjoying it; me, I have to wait until 25th Dec...!!!
 
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Jesse Dean
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It is the cards. After our second game last night we were already noticing some wear on them so we went ahead and got them sleeved. (I typically don't sleeve cards these days...)

The tiles are good quality though.
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doubtofbuddha wrote:
It is the cards. After our second game last night we were already noticing some wear on them so we went ahead and got them sleeved. (I typically don't sleeve cards these days...)

The tiles are good quality though.

Perhaps I should invest in some sleeves. What dimensions are the cards, please?
 
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Jesse Dean
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About the same size as Magic: The Gathering cards. I got some clear ultra-pro sleeves and they fit in those well. Penny sleeves were too big.
 
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doubtofbuddha wrote:
About the same size as Magic: The Gathering cards. I got some clear ultra-pro sleeves and they fit in those well. Penny sleeves were too big.

Definitely get sleeves. I do for most of my games that are going to get played a lot, and this game needs them because of the 'different' manufacturing quality. I've never seen cards made like this before, they are a bit odd, tend to fray a bit at the edges, but are absolutely fine in sleeves.

And, avoid the cheap sleeves at all costs. Both the Ultra-Pro ones and the Mayday ones are just a false economy. They are too big, which means the card is loose and the thin plastic just crinkles and is awful. I recommend Mayday MDG-7077 sleeves, available from Mayday direct or Gameslore in the UK. I've sleeved all of mine with these sleeves
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Jon Day
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I used the Japanese "perfect fit" brand and they were as described
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