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Subject: PanzerBlitz: Restoring the Old Classic rss

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Sim Guy
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PanzerBlitz

PanzerBlitz? Am I kidding? No, actually. It, and it’s sibling Panzer Leader were two of the bestselling games in the history of the hobby. There are a ton of used copies out there still, and they are readily available for anyone who really wants one. But “why”, you may ask, “would I want one in the first place?” And you would do well to ask. After all, if I’m going to shell out a chunk of my limited gaming money, there are a lot of newer titles that 1) cover the same subject, 2) at the same scale, 3)that are almost all better looking and, 4) most importantly they are probably better games – aren’t they? In all honesty, yes, they probably are, but maybe not as much better as you might think, especially considering it’s been more than 40 years since PB was introduced.

PanzerBlitz was one of the first wargames I ever played - it was certainly the most complex game I’d played up to that time. My first gaming group owned three games: Richthofen's War, The Game of France, 1940: German Blitzkrieg in the West, and PanzerBlitz – not a bad cross section in 1973. I was most familiar with the France 1940 style operational mechanics, which seemed to be the most common wargame design mechanics of the day. PB was a major departure from this sort of design: the units were very small scale, they had no zones of control, they fired at different ranges – some at very long distances, and the counters were very busy by comparison. I loved the look of the game from the start, but unfortunately I was introduced to the game by someone who was more interested in clobbering a n00b than he was in teaching the game. I hated my first PanzerBlitz game experience. I disliked it so much that it was probably a year before another player talked me into playing again. This time my mentor took the time to explain what was going on. I still lost miserably (beginning a long tradition in my experience with tactical games), but this time I had fun, and I soon acquired a copy of my own. It wasn’t long before I was setting up huge “use all the counters” scenarios of my own to play through the weekends. I was completely hooked. As the later games were published – Panzer Leader and The Arab-Israeli Wars – I picked them up as well, and combined them into even larger battles. Even today, I own more than a dozen sets of PB/PL/AIW and have a long running campaign in progress. Except for a fallow period in the late ‘80s, when I was playing no wargames at all, I’ve played some PanzerBlitz at least once a month, since those early days.

Although PanzerBlitz was published by Avalon Hill, it was actually designed by SPI (Simulations Publications, Inc.) Jim Dunnigan and was one of a number of games he designed that eventually became AH products. It first saw the light of day in the early Strategy & Tactics magazine as Tactical Game 3, where the familiar black silhouetted counters with the numbers in the corners were introduced. Tactical games, outside of miniatures, were uncommon at the time, and Dunnigan’s system was groundbreaking in many respects. Many elements found in today’s tactical armored combat games were first seen in PanzerBlitz: platoon size formations (companies for the Russians), units made up of a single homogeneous type (e.g., Riflemen, Engineers, Artillery pieces, Trucks, Tanks), targets have to be spotted by line of sight in order to be fired upon, it included multiple geomorphic map boards that fit together in a variety of configurations, and lots of scenarios (well, 12, but that was a lot for the day, and the rules encouraged you to design your own). Some miniatures based elements are incorporated into things like the weapons effectiveness chart and unit function tables, but they don’t overpower the game. Most of these elements, if not the actual implementations, are recognizable in contemporary tactical games.

But enough history; how does the game play?

The game is a simulation of small unit tactical engagements between the German and Russian forces on the Eastern Front during the middle years of WWII. The game scale is very small; each hex equals about 250 meters, each turn represents about six minutes of real time, units are Platoons and Companies. So four hexes is a kilometer, and a mile is about six hexes. The 12 Scenarios are generally 10-12 turns long, so about an hour of simulated battle time.

Actions are generally small, totaling somewhere between a battalion and a brigade engaged on each side. Most battles may be characterized by: an approach to the enemy, contact, fragmentation of forces into a number of smaller engagements, fire is exchanged between the combatants in attempts to pin, and eventually destroy, the opposing units. Play rewards the thoughtful employment of Direct Fire, Indirect Fire, and Close Assault tactics. Even the original version does a good job of emphasizing the importance of cooperation between the various troop types in executing combined arms tactics.

The rules are well written, although only marginally well organized, with subsequent versions much improved (more on that later). Charts covering terrain, weapons effectiveness, and combat results are adequate to the task. One of the nicer bonuses included in the game is a historical booklet, which is a combination of history, designer’s notes, and an invitation to create your own variants. The booklet includes organizational charts for players who may be curious about what a higher echelon unit (battalion, regiment, brigade, division) looks like in game terms, or for those adventurous souls who would like to pit a couple of divisions against each other.


The game’s 12 scenarios are printed on half letter-size cards, and are titled Situations 1-12; user designed scenarios are referred to as Situation 13s. Each card describes an engagement between the German and Soviet forces, and the units involved are graphically depicted on the card, along with the geomorphic maps used and their configuration. The victory conditions, setup information, any special rules, and a game turn track complete the cards.

As per the original rules, the alternating sequence of play is:
First Player:
Resolve Minefield Attacks
Resolve Fire Attacks
Move and Conduct Overrun Attacks
Execute Close Assaults
Rally Dispersed Units
Repeat Sequence for the Second Player

This 'fire first, then move', sequence was a departure from the majority of the games of the early 70s, where units would move and then fight. Here combat came first, before movement, with the exception of the much more intimate overruns and close assaults. In common with contemporary games, combat is odds based and uses a CRT. The CRT was novel at the time, in that the results were either No Effect (Blank), Dispersed (D), Double Dispersed (DD), or Target Eliminated (X), there is no Retreat result. The effects of Dispersion are somewhat variable, either the D or DD result signifies that the target unit has been neutralized for the turn and is indicated by the unit being flipped over (PanzerBlitz units, like most of the era, are one-sided). If, however, an attack is made on a unit that is already Dispersed, the target is eliminated if it suffers a DD result or (obviously) worse. Units in a stack can be attacked individually, and by different attacking units, when under Direct Fire attack. Indirect Artillery Fire attacks are made against the entire contents of the hex defending as a combined unit (historically, this caused some problems, which we’ll discuss later). Units can only be attacked by each type of fire once per turn, so in order to take advantage of the Dispersion of a unit (which only lasts the duration of the turn), it often has to be hit by a Close Assault or an Overrun attack later in the turn. Close Assault combat is performed by infantry units and represents the close quarters, sometime hand to hand, combat that takes place when Infantry attacks. Close Assault is the only way that Infantry can attack an Armored unit, and it is effective enough to make a player realize why Armor seldom acted alone without Infantry support. Armored units have their own close quarters attack method, however, and can roll through an occupied hex in an Overrun attack, provided certain conditions are met – imagine a cluster of tanks rushing through an Infantry position with their machine guns blazing away at anything they can see and you get the idea behind Overruns.

Combat is modified by terrain type and elevation, range, and weapon vs unit type (AP rounds are less effective against troops, bullets have no effect on armored targets) summarized on the Weapons Effectiveness Chart (WEC). Terrain also affects movement rates – units can move fastest on roads, slower cross-country, slower still through woods and swamps – and can block line of sight (LOS) to a target. All targets have to be in sight, and Spotted by one of your units in order to be fired upon – either you must have a unit actually in sight of an enemy unit, or your unit must have come under fire by an enemy unit in order to consider it Spotted (this rule is also problematic). As mentioned previously, there are no Zones of Control; units can move freely past one another (creating a source of still more problems).

Unlike the larger scale games of the day, PanzerBlitz units moved farther and more often than players were used to. There is no point in setting up the unbroken line of units from one side of the board to another – you probably won’t have near enough units to do so in the first place. The lines, such as they are, are porous and allow for a great deal of maneuverability. Players familiar with operational level games, have to think in different ways about how to attack and defend. In the 70s, a lot of people didn’t like it; a lot of people weren’t very good at it (Guilty!), and a lot of people who were good at it, and liked it, wanted to make changes to make it even better. But sales don’t lie; PB was one of the most popular titles in the history of the hobby. It was obviously giving a large number of players a lot of something they wanted.

Warts and All

The original PanzerBlitz had some problems:
The way the rules were written, an attacker could cross great expanses of open terrain with impunity, in plain sight of the enemy, moving from cover to cover without fear. This is obviously unrealistic as, in battle, your opponent isn’t likely to wait until you’ve found another place to hide before starting to take shots at you. This phenomenon came to be known derisively as PanzerBush.
Massing your troops in a hex, in order to strengthen them from artillery fire, by combining their defensive values, is counterintuitive and unrealistic, as crowding your targets into a small space should actually increase the effect of artillery against a group of units.
These and other issues were flies in the ointment for most PanzerBlitz players, and the more inventive players thought up their own solutions to the problems. But not to worry, a new improved Panzer Leader rulebook was in the offing and would solve (almost) everything.

New Rules

Like many a game series today, the rules for Panzer Leader were, intentionally or not, the next version of rules for PanzerBlitz. They had taken into account the debates in the gaming community and consolidated many suggestions from them into a new rulebook, which was backward compatible with the earlier game. Dealing with the Western Front, Panzer Leader now addressed such topics as Amphibious operations and Airpower, and presented players with a slew of optional rules from which to pick and choose (including Opportunity Fire, Smoke Screens, Split Movement, etc.). Why am I telling you about the Panzer Leader rules in a review of PanzerBlitz?, you probably aren’t asking (we’re a pretty savvy bunch, you probably already know the answer). Because the PanzerBlitz rules are really useful only for historical interest, and at best should be treated as a basic set of rules that should be put aside in favor of the Panzer Leader rules, right?

Wrongo, dog breath! Because if you’re alive today (and if you’re reading this you must be), Avalon Hill’s development of the series did not end with Panzer Leader whether they meant to or not. The bright boys at AH wanted to bring the game into modern times and were already contemplating a Panzer Leader version for the ‘80s. They had a ready topic - the recent ’73 Yom Kippur War was still fresh in everyone’s minds - and figured to start there.

The Arab-Israeli Wars game was introduced to great anticipation by us old PanzerBlitzern, a mere three years later, in 1977. The rules had undergone another significant makeover. The basic mechanics of the original game hadn’t changed, but many of the details had been modified, and some new concepts were introduced. A couple of the biggest changes were in the movement rates, and in the way Indirect Fire was handled.
The original movement rates had been based on a vehicle’s maximum cross-country speed, a more realistic estimation, based on a vehicle’s more usual operational employment was now used, amounting to movement rates of about 60% of the values used in the original PanzerBlitz.
Likewise, artillery attack values were reduced by a factor of 4, but were now to be applied separately to each unit in the target hex. The Weapons Effectiveness Chart (WEC) was reworked as well, partly to address these changes, and also to accommodate more modern weapons, greatly affecting the way that certain weapons would now be used.
Morale was introduced: it mainly affected a given unit’s ability to recover from the effects of Disruption – no longer would a unit simply spring back to effectiveness at the end of a turn, now players had to make a roll to determine recovery.

Many other minor changes were made to reflect the modern battlefield, ca. 1973, and into the 80’s (anti-tank missiles, helicopters, and more), changes that are not necessary for PanzerBlitz play. But on the whole, these rules are the best set to use, IMHO. The battles are now more interactive, the rules are still simple, but have enough available detail to make the simulation more realistic without bogging the game down too much.

The gaming community is very fond of the PanzerBlitz family and there are many variants and files available to users who soldier on with the old classic. They can be found in abundance here on BGG, and in places like ConSimWorld ( http://consimworld.com/), and Web-Grognards ( http://grognard.com/). Many incorporate the most important AIW rule changes into a PB/PL context, along with other variants to fill some gaps in the original WWII games. The best of the third party sources, at least for my purposes, has been Ward McBurney’s excellent Imaginative Strategist site (http://www.imaginative-strategist.layfigures.com/). Here you can find additional geomorphic map files for all three games in the series. There are counter sets that expand the existing forces and add many other nationalities to the PB/PL force pools (Italy, Japan, Poland, Finland, and more).

There are new scenarios, articles on the design and play of the games, and some awesome artwork. There are links to other PB/PL resources as well; my favorite being Greg Moore’s site (http://gregpanzerblitz.com/), where he has done some great work on unit organizations, campaign histories, and even more variant counters – all compatible with Ward’s. All of these additional rules and bits bring the system closer to the state of the art.

The PanzerBlitz I play these days, would barely recognizable to a player of the original version. My ‘PanzerBlitz 2K’ rules set (if I can dignify it thusly) includes the base AIW rules, a number of variants collected and adapted over the years, including my own, and a plethora of house rules. I’ve adopted many of the Optional Rules from Panzer Leader and AIW, and tweaked them a bit to suit my preferences. I’ve added Leaders and a set of Air Rules, and I’m working on a chit-pull activation scheme as well as Command General attributes and behaviors (mainly for solo play). Many of these modifications have been aided and abetted by the online resources that I’ve already mentioned. I don’t always use them all, but that’s what house rules are all about. In my opinion, my adjustments significantly improve PanzerBlitz as both a simulation and a game (for me anyway, your experiences may vary). Even so, there is only so much that the changes can accomplish before the game becomes unrecognizable.

A friend of mine, who likes to restore old cars, once said to me that no matter what you did to a 40 or 50 year old car, in the end you were still driving a 40 or 50 year old car. So if you wanted the amenities of a new car in your old car (fancy suspensions, power features, anti-lock brakes, etc.), you were probably going to be disappointed – there’s a lot that you can fix or replace, but it isn’t going to be a new car when you finish. That sort of sums up the way that I feel about PanzerBlitz – there’s a lot of it that can be brought up to contemporary design standards, but at its heart it is still a 40+ year old game. I’ve been playing it for so long now that I don’t really care about many of its shortcomings – the rules are second nature to me, I don’t have to refer to them at all during a game. I know it’s not perfect, and that there are better games out there now (for example, the Panzer Grenadier: Road to Berlin series from Avalanche Press Ltd., and the World at War: Eisenbach Gap series from Lock 'n Load Publishing, LLC., both of which I think are great), but this is the one I come back to again and again.

Would I recommend PanzerBlitz to a new player, not likely, I’d point them at one of the newer offerings. But to an older PanzerBlitzer I would say: Don’t give up on the old game; you can still get a lot of entertainment out of it, with a few updates. And if just you don’t want to make the effort, let me know and I’ll take them off your hands.


For those of you interested in, or just curious about, my particular house variants I have included them below.

PB2K
Start with AIW rules
Ignore the air rules and guided missile provisions.
Adopt the Movement and Indirect Fire adjustments.
Replacing the WEC with Sim Guy variant.*
Use a simplified version of the Morale Rules (All dispersed units recover on a d6 roll of 1-5).

Sim Guy’s PB House Rules*
Turreted split move
Transport split move
Tracked Breakdowns
Modified Opportunity Fire
Combined Arms
Elite Troops
Retreat
IF Scatter

My Variants
Sim Guy’s Air Rules*
Leader Rules*
Panzer Campaigns*


*File found on BGG PanzerBlitz game page
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John Kovacs
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Elyria
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An excellent review of a game series that has to be considered a classic by whatever yardstick someone might want to use. PanzerBlitz started the tactical level genre of wargames that had never been seen before (other than miniatures) at the time (1970) and should rightly be considered the grandfather of all of those that followed.

I myself started in this hobby with Panzer Leader some time in the mid-1970s. My brother and I played Panzer Leader a lot over the next couple of years and it led to both of us expanding our wargame collections. One of the first games added to my collection was The Arab-Israeli Wars because I wanted to see how the system worked for modern equipment (plus I liked the idea of a small but powerful Israeli force pitted against a large but not-so-good Arab force). I was not disappointed, and the Designer Notes brought up the corrections to the system that could certainly be applied to PanzerBlitz/Panzer Leader. I also bought the 1940 expansion to Panzer Leader that was directly available from Avalon Hill, and I picked up a 2nd and used copy of Panzer Leader from a nearby toy show. I eventually acquired PanzerBlitz via eBay to round out the trilogy (Avalon Hill had sadly bitten the dust by then) and I can happily say that I have played all three games in the series - something that I cannot say about most of the rest of my collection. There's just something about a good tank-vs-tank game that cannot be denied.

So, yes, there might be better games out there (I have three of the World at War series of games, plus MBT/IDF (Israeli Defense Force) and a goodly number of SPI tank games as well) but I keep coming back to Panzer Leader and marveling over the geomorphic mapboards, the scenario cards, the WEC/CRT, and the wonderful counters that were at one time the cutting edge of the hobby, and wanting to play it again. That is the magic of this game series - you want to play it again, and maybe you'll try out some of the new rules, counters, mapboards, or scenarios that have been worked up by fellow enthusiasts of the series over the decades since these games were first published. Not too many other game systems have the kind of following this one does - at least for those of us that cut our wargaming teeth on them.
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Bill Eldard
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Outstanding summary and review of the PB family of games, Sim Guy.

John Kovacs mentioned the 1940 expansion to Panzer Leader. I found that expansion to be very interesting because the weaker tanks (less firepower and protection) meant that players had to think through the scenarios differently any apply tactics than in regular PB/PL.
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Carl Paradis
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I started this year a complete revamp of the Panzerblitz/PanzerLeader Combat rules.

I'll use the game's original components, but there will not be Combat Tables anymore, or dice to throw! And some simple Morale/Opportunity fire rules will be added.

Instead I'll use some round 2-sided battle markers for the Combat resolution. Each player (attacker and defender) will throw a variable number and they are compared to get the battle result. Each nationality will have its own set of markers, and some specials could be added/removed for peculiar situations.

3 types of markers will be included. Anti-Infantry Combat, Anti-tank Combat, Indirect Fire.

hpefully I'll have time to finish it all before the end of this year.
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Dan Edelen
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Like you, PanzerBlitz was my first "adult" game. I bought it as a youngster back when it first came out. Though I have many fond memories of playing the game during summer breaks in my school days, it sat for a few decades on my shelves unplayed. I don't wargame much anymore, so I was holding onto it for sentimental reasons only. Sadly, I recently math traded it.

Now I miss it just a little more. cry
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Dan Edelen
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BTW, the [floatleft] and [floatright] commands are great for wrapping text around pics in a review such as this one.
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Sim Guy
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licinius wrote:
I started this year a complete revamp of the Panzerblitz/PanzerLeader Combat rules.

I'll use the game's original components, but there will not be Combat Tables anymore, or dice to throw! And some simple Morale/Opportunity fire rules will be added.

Instead I'll use some round 2-sided battle markers for the Combat resolution. Each player (attacker and defender) will throw a variable number and they are compared to get the battle result. Each nationality will have its own set of markers, and some specials could be added/removed for peculiar situations.

3 types of markers will be included. Anti-Infantry Combat, Anti-tank Combat, Indirect Fire.

hpefully I'll have time to finish it all before the end of this year.

As you would assume, I am very interested to see what you come up with.
Peter Rogers
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...has done a pretty good job of adapting the AIW rules to PB/PL, and produced counters with the proper movement and Indirect Fire values as well (his files are on the PB page, as if you didn't know). I like about 90% of it, and would end up adding most of my house rules to round it out. I've toyed with the idea of a rewrite myself, and will probably get around to it someday. But I see no reason to reinvent the wheel, so I'll probably start with Peter's rules and go from there.
 
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Carl Paradis
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Thanks! I want to keep my upgrade REALLY simple 7 fast playing. hopefully ot will work out, and without any changes to the game's components!

I don't knwo if I'm right or not, but I think that in the 80's peter (if it was him) in fact sent me his complete PB/PL overhaul document.

I have to write to him to check that out!!!



 
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Dampenon Fabien
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Rookies talk about strategy, Grognards about Logistics
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What are you thinking about



Is it a game which can be considered in PB Family ?

Can we use its rules to refresh (once again ?) our old (and lovely) PB/PL ?



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Carl Paradis
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Dampenon wrote:

Can we use its rules to refresh (once again ?) our old (and lovely) PB/PL ?


Nah. Besides the scale, it has nothing in common with the old (and lovely) PB/PL games.

My goal is to use the original components without any changes to them.
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Sim Guy
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Dampenon wrote:
What are you thinking about



Is it a game which can be considered in PB Family ?

Can we use its rules to refresh (once again ?) our old (and lovely) PB/PL ?

When I first saw the new game, I thought that they had cleaned it up by fixing the scale, movement, and fire value problems. The more I read the more that I saw that the game was almost completely changed. The extra values on the counters could have been used to eliminate the WEC - giving values for anti-Armor vs anti-Personnel. MMP could have produced a very contemporary title and saved the feel of the old system, but they would have been better off starting with a clean slate instead of trying to get the old fans excited about a new PanzerBlitz that wasn't really coming.
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Tom T
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You might want to take a look at these PanzerBlitz modern variants.

http://www.toshachminiatures.com/games.htm

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Martin McCleary
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I think the original holds up just fine as is and would in fact be a good way to introduce "new" gamers to the tactical level. It is relatively simple to play and is not at all fiddly like many newer games. It plays quickly, the counters are large and can be easily read. There are, on ebay, upgraded color counter sets to be had for about 20 bucks or you can do your own.

I took it to Consim last year and I was amazed at the number of folks who came by and watched us play, many seemed to have simply forgotten about it.

I don't think Panzer Grenadier or other more recent titles are "better", the end result is about the same in terms of battle outcome, they just require more time and additional detail.

The community has been in search of the elusive perfect tactical wargame since PB came out; there is no such thing but folks will keep trying. Adding chrome, cards, additonal levels of detail is all nice - for some - but the base itch, the "ah ha" moment has yet to be achieved. Any tactical game has faults but PB is no more wrong than any other attempt at the topic.

The new MMP PB is a fine game in its own right but true, it's not the old game. I like both.
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Tim K
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licinius wrote:
I started this year a complete revamp of the Panzerblitz/PanzerLeader Combat rules.

I'll use the game's original components, but there will not be Combat Tables anymore, or dice to throw! And some simple Morale/Opportunity fire rules will be added.

Instead I'll use some round 2-sided battle markers for the Combat resolution. Each player (attacker and defender) will throw a variable number and they are compared to get the battle result. Each nationality will have its own set of markers, and some specials could be added/removed for peculiar situations.

3 types of markers will be included. Anti-Infantry Combat, Anti-tank Combat, Indirect Fire.

hpefully I'll have time to finish it all before the end of this year.


Wow, this sounds awesome. I am really looking forward to seeing what you come up with!
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Byron Henderson
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Exceptional write-up! Thanks for the trip down the proverbial Memory Lane.

And also thanks for highlighting Ward and Greg's sites. Although Ward hasn't done much work on his site recently, he is contemplating making some new things and Greg is back to work on his T0&Es (the latest was a D-Day scenario he added to commemorate June 6).

I agree that the community as a whole has created a LOT of excellent counters and boards (caveat: 2xIndustries has ripped off a lot of the gaming community's counters and boards and sold them on ebay, etc. without even acknowledging the original creators). This game actually has a thriving group of very loyal fans!
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Keith Plymale
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Great review. Greg's and Ward's sites have redone counters for both the 1940 and 1941 expansions that are based on the writings summarized by Alan Arvold that are on Ward's site too. Byron has done a lot of great writing there and on the Consimworld site I recommend.
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Doug Ragan
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Carl,
Please tell me how you are doing in revamping the old PB. I, too, have decided to redesign the game with the condition of using the old counters, maps and scenarios. I am about 80% through the redesign and have slowed down due to my real life activities. I would be willing to share all my ideas and rewrites if you think that you would be interested.
Cheers
Doug Ragan
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Carl Paradis
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Doug Ragan wrote:
Carl,
Please tell me how you are doing in revamping the old PB. I, too, have decided to redesign the game with the condition of using the old counters, maps and scenarios. I am about 80% through the redesign and have slowed down due to my real life activities. I would be willing to share all my ideas and rewrites if you think that you would be interested.
Cheers
Doug Ragan


Hello Doug!

YES I'm interested! I have stopped working on this for a while and intended to restart in 2013 as I have other urgent game projects I want to finish first. Where are you living? Canada or Oregon?

the best way to go would probably for me to give you a call first to check if we have the same "vision" on this. But I suspect that both of our efforts could complement each other splendidly.

My main emphasis will be on the combat & Moral & Cohesion & Command system (totally new). I want something realistic, easy to use, fast, and EXCITING.

Write to me on BGG and we'll get this thing going forward.

Carl
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Doug Ragan
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Hey Carl,
Glad to have your response. I sent two emails to "licinius". If you didn't get those two emails, please tell me and I can send them again through BGG.
Doug
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Carl Paradis
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Doug Ragan wrote:
Hey Carl,
Glad to have your response. I sent two emails to "licinius". If you didn't get those two emails, please tell me and I can send them again through BGG.
Doug


Got them. Will Answer ASAP.
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Doug Ragan
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Canmore, Alberta
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Carl ... and anyone else who might be interested in helping out with constructive criticisms on a new design of the old Panzerblitz. I will soon upload my draft of the redesign to the "files" section. It is called "PanzerBlitz Asymmetrized". I need some honest comments on my progress to date so that I know whether to spend any more time on "my" redesign. Have I created a monster or have I made it simpler? Have I improved on the asymmetry of the battles? Any comments, good and bad, would be highly appreciated.

Cheers
Doug Ragan
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Carl Paradis
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Doug Ragan wrote:
Carl ... and anyone else who might be interested in helping out with constructive criticisms on a new design of the old Panzerblitz. I will soon upload my draft of the redesign to the "files" section. It is called "PanzerBlitz Asymmetrized". I need some honest comments on my progress to date so that I know whether to spend any more time on "my" redesign. Have I created a monster or have I made it simpler? Have I improved on the asymmetry of the battles? Any comments, good and bad, would be highly appreciated.

Cheers
Doug Ragan


Excellent! I am very interested in seeing what you have done. When will you be able to share this?
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Doug Ragan
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Canmore, Alberta
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Carl and the rest of you "redesigners"
I have placed my 80% redesign of PB in the files section. It is called "PanzerBlitz Asymmetrized" version 12 of DRAFT 1. It still needs a lot of work. It preserves the original counters, maps and scenarios but now requires lots of play testing and fine tuning. Although it appears at first reading a little cumbersome, it actually plays quickly. But it also requires attrition and C.O. counters which I will post in the files section or even include in DRAFT 2.
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Carl Paradis
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Doug Ragan wrote:
Carl and the rest of you "redesigners"
I have placed my 80% redesign of PB in the files section. It is called "PanzerBlitz Asymmetrized" version 12 of DRAFT 1. It still needs a lot of work. It preserves the original counters, maps and scenarios but now requires lots of play testing and fine tuning. Although it appears at first reading a little cumbersome, it actually plays quickly. But it also requires attrition and C.O. counters which I will post in the files section or even include in DRAFT 2.


Thanks Doug!!!

I shoudl have finished proofing my latest design in a few weeks or so. Then I'll have some free time to look at all your work. So probably starting around the 14th of February
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Doug Ragan
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Carl,
OK. I look forward to your design. I am just about to get back into my redesign also since I have some spare time ahead of me now.
Cheers
Doug
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