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Subject: Thoughts on advancing agendas rss

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Geoff Hollis
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It’s really easy to get into ruts on how you advance agendas as a corporation. Intuitively, you want to minimize the time that agendas are on the table so the runner has fewer chances to steal them, and also minimize the amount of damage that could be done if somehow the runner manages to score that agenda. This leads to some pretty default lines of play:

1. Play priority requisition, advance it twice, and then finish it next turn
2. Play private security force, advance it once, and then finish it next turn
3. Play accelerated beta tests, and advance it three times next turn or, if you want to mitigate possible disasters from its activation, play it, advance it 1-2 times, and finish it next turn

These lines of play seem safe and smart -- the types of things a shrewd player should be doing. Sometimes they’re good lines of play. However, sometimes they are not.

Netrunner is a game of hidden information. As corp you may know what all is on the table, but the runner does not have that same vantage point. You may know that you’ve dropped a priority req on the table and advanced it twice. The runner doesn’t.

One of the corp’s strongest points is his near-omniscience of the game state, whereas the runner is left guessing about alot of things. As corporation you can prey on the worst fears of the runner, making a line of 3 unrezzed pieces of ice look like a daunting waste of effort when, in fact, they’re just three enigmas that the runner can easily break for 3 credits. You can make upgrades and assets look like agendas, and you can make agendas look like ambushes. Unless the runner makes a run or exposes a card, he’ll never know for certain.

But if you are always playing the same cards in the same way, and you are giving tell-tale signals that “when I drop a card and advance it twice, it is priority requisition” or “when I drop a card and advance it once, it is private security force”, you betray yourself by giving the runner free information. You’re setting yourself up to lose, especially right now when, numerically, the game is horrendously in favor of the runner (my opinion, anyways). That is to say, if cards were played face-up rather than face down, the runner would win the vast majority of (all?) games.

The corporation’s strongest weapons in A:NR are misdirection, making the runner squander resources on bad runs, and preying on the runner’s fears about unrezzed cards.

To leverage your power as the corporation, you want to reduce how much “free” information you are giving off to the runner during the course of exposure with them. You also want to maximize the perceived risk of the runner making a bad decision. Your tactics for doing this will vary considerably if you are playing against an unknown opponent compare to playing against your buddy for your 1000th game. The more you play with a person, the more habits can be discerned. Right now, though, I want to discuss some effective lines of play against new opponents.

Delayed Triple Advance

One of the scariest lines of play the corporation can do is drop an agenda behind a line of unrezzed ice, and then next turn advance it three times. Lots of runners will leave unrezzed cards untouched, sometimes even ones in unprotected servers! Very often, these are cards you don’t want to deal with until they are rezzed (e.g., PAD campaign, Adonis Campaign). Although you know you’ve actually dropped a priority requisition and the runner is at 4 agenda points, HE doesn’t know that!

And then what is the runner to think, next turn, when you advance it three times? From the runner’s perspective, It feels like a priority requisition, or possibly a posted bounty. But what if it’s not? What if it’s a project junebug? As a runner, do you want to risk flatlining on a vague feeling? Naww. Let him keep whatever it is. There’s more agendas to be found. You can always wait for the next one, when you have infiltration in hand.

The delayed triple advance is such a powerful play for the corporation. It puts more at risk on the corporation’s side (i.e., a couple more credits and, if it’s an agenda, it’s on the table for 1 turn longer). However, it increases the threat to an alarming level from the perspective of a runner. Hitting a 2-advance ambush kinda hurts, but it’s not overwhelmingly deadly. You can suck it up if you have to. Hitting a 3-advance ambush, however, is game-changing. It very likely spells the end of the runner.

Running blind on a 2-advanced card is risky, but not life threatening. Running blind on a 3-advanced card has the very real possibility of ending the game instantly, even if the runner is up 6-0 for agenda points.

Plays like this are especially powerful when the corporation is behind. The runner may think “even if it is priority requisition, I am going to be up 6-3 and in a commanding position. Let him take it”. These power-plays can give you a foothold you so desperately need when you are being overrun.

Against a smart, strong player you have never encountered before, plays like this can be very powerful even if you have no ambushes in your deck. The runner doesn’t know your deck composition, especially at the very beginning of the game. Leverage this fact and prey on their fears. Put them into difficult decisions of “making 3 points or losing the game”.

The 1-3-5

Let’s say the runner has scored 4 advancement points and you have scored 3. You drop a card on the table and advance it once on your turn. The runner looks at it and thinks “1 advancement. This looks like private security force. If I run on it, I’m stealing my opponent’s agenda, but I’m only marginally improving my own position. What I really want to hit is a priority requisition”. In a situation like this, a runner may even decide for himself that it is a private security force and let you score it, so he can build up resources to make a big run when he absolutely needs to.

Your next turn comes around, and now you advance the card two more times. Then you lay down some ice over your R&D to make it look like you’re reinforcing your defenses. The runner’s turn comes around and he might think something like “well, this is peculiar. If it was a private security force, why didn’t he score it? It looks like he’s realized that I can’t win off of private security force, but I can win off of a priority requisition. He’s giving me another shot at this security force to prevent me from hitting priority requisition. But at the same time, it oozes like a trap! 3 advancement tokens is scary. What if I’m wrong. What if he is baiting me into running on a souped-up aggressive secretary, project junebug, or ghost branch? Auuuugh! I’ll just let him score that dumb security force and keep preparing to hit that priority requisition when it drops”.

Your third turn comes around. It turns out you were playing priority requisition all along. Now you score it and distance your opponent even further for victory -- that’s one fewer 3-point agenda he can capture, increasing the likelihood he’ll have to capture at least two more agendas to win the game.

I’m not saying that a runner will always think this way. But it’s a very sensible interpretation of the situation from the runner’s perspective, and drives home a point: as a corporation your actions send information to the runner, and you can improve your chances of winning by telling what seem to be “very obvious stories” with your actions that are, in fact, incorrect.

The desperate double-advance

Always bluffing with your actions is just as bad as always playing transparently. Against a discerning opponent, they will see through the stories of your actions and realize what’s going on. You don’t want to always misinform the runner but, rather, put the runner in a position where he has no clue what is fact and what is fiction.

There are times when you want to play a priority requisition and advance it twice in a single turn. One of those times is when you are down 6-0 and are in such a bad position that you have, for all intents and purposes, lost the game. This is a particularly excellent play when you drop the agenda behind a line of unrezzed ice, but only have 5-6 credits.

From a runner’s perspective, a line of unrezzed ice covering a double-advanced card is daunting... until you realize that there is no way the runner has enough money to rez anything scary. From a runner’s perspective, this looks like a newbie that is trying to be “tricky” with a trap, forcing you to run on a bunch of unrezzed ice, in the hopes of scoring an agenda and then, bam, aggressive secretary! Fooled you! Pwn’d n00b!

Anyways, that’s the impression I often get from this play. So... use it to your advantage. If a line of play oozes like a bluff, use that to your advantage and play it truthfully. In a situation where you are down 6-0, it’s not like you’re really risking anything -- if you don’t do something huge to turn the game around right away, you’re going to lose. You’ll get called out every few games, but in the long run, you need to make desperate, honest moves like this every now and then to pull off those huge comebacks.

Conclusion

To succeed as corporation, you have to leverage the fact that so much of your game state is hidden. You need to “blend” your traps and your agendas together. You need to make your “weak” servers and your “strong” servers equally daunting in appearance. You need to spark the runner’s descent into madness.

I’ve laid out a few of my favorite tactics for doing this against new opponents. These plays are not always intuitive, because at face value they neither minimize the time your agendas spend on the table, nor minimize the amount of credits/clicks you stand to lose if an agenda is stolen. That said, they do minimize the amount of information you give to the runner, which is a far more important resource in many situations.
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Richard Linnell
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Great article. Any thoughts on advancing multiple agendas/assets simultaneously? I know it gets costly, but two or three data forts with at least 1 ICE in front of them can make the runner double guess themselves (clearly the agenda is in the more heavily defended fort, except that he knows I would try that, so it's in the other one, except...)

I think that FFG has done a splendid job with the base set in controlling the Meta to a point where it enhances the give and take double bluffing aspect of the game. Scorched Earth and Project Junebug are always a threat since there is no "safe" way to make a run from inside an armored fridge or behind stacks of shield programs.
 
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Geoff Hollis
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solidhavok wrote:
Any thoughts on advancing multiple agendas/assets simultaneously?


This is a concept that is always on the back of my mind, although I do not really have anything substantial to say about the concept right now. Stay tuned, I guess.
 
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hollis wrote:
solidhavok wrote:
Any thoughts on advancing multiple agendas/assets simultaneously?


This is a concept that is always on the back of my mind, although I do not really have anything substantial to say about the concept right now. Stay tuned, I guess.

I actually just did this today. I had a card face down in a 3-ice server. On my turn, I dropped a second card in a 1-ice server and advanced both cards once. Next turn, I played something (I think it was a Beanstalk) and advanced both 1 more time. The runner ran head-first into the 3-ice server, confident that's where I'd hide my Agenda... Aggressive Secretary wiped out all the programs the runner would need to access the actual Agenda.
 
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Peter O
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Good article. Its why I like to always have at least a single trap in every deck. Even if the trap get's turned over on an R&D run, the fact it was in there at all forces the runner to respect the idea that there could be more.
 
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Alex Rockwell
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Game theory: be unpredictable.

Sometimes put out an agenda and advance it the number you need so that next turn you can advance it three times and score it. Occasionally put it out there lightly guarded and do nothing with it for a while, then later add one to it. Then add one more. Then finish it. Occasionally put it out and advance it once and then leave it there for a while, even though you could score it. Occasionally just put one out there and leave it there all game.

Put things out and dont immediately pay to res them all the time. Sometimes guarded, sometimes unguarded. Sometimes put your trap out behind an ice and advance it twice right away. Sometimes put it out unguarded and advance it. Sometimes put it our unguarded or guarded and do nothing with it.

Sometimes they make a monumental effort getting throug ha data fort and run into a trap. Sometimes they will get an agenda for free. But they will NEVER know what the hell you are doing!
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Geoff Hollis
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Alexfrog wrote:
Game theory: be unpredictable.

Sometimes put out an agenda and advance it the number you need so that next turn you can advance it three times and score it. Occasionally put it out there lightly guarded and do nothing with it for a while, then later add one to it. Then add one more. Then finish it. Occasionally put it out and advance it once and then leave it there for a while, even though you could score it. Occasionally just put one out there and leave it there all game.

Put things out and dont immediately pay to res them all the time. Sometimes guarded, sometimes unguarded. Sometimes put your trap out behind an ice and advance it twice right away. Sometimes put it out unguarded and advance it. Sometimes put it our unguarded or guarded and do nothing with it.

Sometimes they make a monumental effort getting throug ha data fort and run into a trap. Sometimes they will get an agenda for free. But they will NEVER know what the hell you are doing!


My emphasis bold. It's not nearly that simple. Consider the case of the prisoner's dilemma. In a one-off prisoner's dilemma, you in fact want to be very predictable (always rat opponent out). Even in the iterated version, the best-known strategy is pretty deterministic (tit-for-tat with random forgiveness). Game theory isn't a license to say be unpredictable.

As another example, in rock-paper-scissors playing unpredictably leads to draws. So it's a great strategy for playing a superior opponent, but it's a terrible strategy if you are better at modelling your opponent than they are at modelling you.

In poker (at least the variants I am familiar with), "unpredictably" is not a meaningful term. You could mean play "randomly", which is a surefire way to lose a ton of money very quickly. Alternatively, you could mean play deceptively; minimize how much your opponent can narrow down your range of hands by considering your actions. Even then, you are not balancing raw probabilities but, rather, weighted probabilities based on your opponent's tendencies and the strength of your hand (i.e., relatively-little slowplaying with nut hands, relatively-little raises with a trash hand that can't improve).

In the Sir Phillip Sidney game (which I think corp-side signalling in Netrunner is akin to, though not a perfect fit), there are a couple good strategies: 1) signal honestly most of the time, and deceptively a small proportion of the time, or 2) never signal (which, of course, is not an option in Netrunner).

Are there any games where the "neurotic" style of play you are suggesting is actually documented to be beneficial? I know it can have some value in certain situations in poker. Even then, though, it is largely informed by the strength of the cards you are holding -- to draw the A:NR parallel, you might consider doing what you've said with low-value cards like hostile takeover and posted bounty (and one of the reasons Weyland is so fun to play), but probably not priority requisition.
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Alexfrog wrote:
Game theory: be unpredictable.


This needs to be balanced with 'play to win', which is arguably the more important concept.

If the Corp can protect an Agenda behind a currently unbreakable server, they should do that, and they should take the points -- usually.

I admit to there being a few psych-out maneuvers you can make against an opponent you expect to face often to make them wonder.

Example:

I've put Agenda into big forts and advanced them 3/4 times and then let them sit for three turns until putting the final token on them and scoring them. Why? Because when the Runner sees me do that, they are more likely to run into a well Advanced Junebug some time in the future.

I've also put out a Private Security Force unguarded with 2 advancement tokens on it, and then the next turn placed a junebug with 2 advancement tokens on it the following turn.

Runner was convinced the first was a trap and the second was a bluff.
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Max Maloney
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I'm thinking of adopting a strategy of always putting zero or one click per turn toward asset/agenda. That is: play the asset/agenda in one turn without advancing it. Add one advancement in a turn, but not more.

My theory (and it is little more, as I've played Netrunner about 5 times since it came out in the '90s through to the new version) is that it will do two things:

1. Make it difficult to perceive any patterns in your play. You always play and advance things at the same rate whether agenda or asset, boon or trap.

2. Always give you extra actions in each turn to devote to creds, cards and operations. You're never spending your entire turn advancing an agenda, which means you're always keeping your own economy and ability to respond in a strong state.

Clearly there will be times when you want to break this rigid idea to advance something for the win, for example. But I think it might have be a good general strategy. Thoughts?
 
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Max Maloney
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hollis wrote:
You can make upgrades and assets look like agendas

Is this accurate? I thought Upgrades were played in a distinct position that identifies them as such.
 
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Geoff Hollis
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Dormammu wrote:
hollis wrote:
You can make upgrades and assets look like agendas

Is this accurate? I thought Upgrades were played in a distinct position that identifies them as such.


It is, in fact, correct! I thought the same thing because of the way the rule book diagrams things. But, no, there is no distinct positioning for agendas, assets, or upgrades in remote servers.
 
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hollis wrote:
Dormammu wrote:
hollis wrote:
You can make upgrades and assets look like agendas

Is this accurate? I thought Upgrades were played in a distinct position that identifies them as such.


It is, in fact, correct! I thought the same thing because of the way the rule book diagrams things. But, no, there is no distinct positioning for agendas, assets, or upgrades in remote servers.


there is a "root" for upgrades in central servers, but that is just because what is "installed" in those central servers are your hand/deck/discard pile, and not cards as in remote servers. in a remote server, you dont distinguish, and thus cant tell if its an asset, upgrade, or agenda.
 
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Rafael Duarte
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hollis wrote:

You’re setting yourself up to lose, especially right now when, numerically, the game is horrendously in favor of the runner (my opinion, anyways). That is to say, if cards were played face-up rather than face down, the runner would win the vast majority of (all?) games.


Horrendously? So you wanted the game to be balanced with cards face up? Of course Corp must have weaker cards cause they already have the advantage of playing hidden cards and that's a huge advantage.
 
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Geoff Hollis
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rafa_str wrote:
hollis wrote:

You’re setting yourself up to lose, especially right now when, numerically, the game is horrendously in favor of the runner (my opinion, anyways). That is to say, if cards were played face-up rather than face down, the runner would win the vast majority of (all?) games.


So you wanted the game to be balanced with cards face up?


Certainly no. The point I was making depends on the rest of that paragraph:

hollis wrote:
But if you are always playing the same cards in the same way, and you are giving tell-tale signals that “when I drop a card and advance it twice, it is priority requisition” or “when I drop a card and advance it once, it is private security force”, you betray yourself by giving the runner free information. You’re setting yourself up to lose, especially right now when, numerically, the game is horrendously in favor of the runner (my opinion, anyways). That is to say, if cards were played face-up rather than face down, the runner would win the vast majority of (all?) games.


If you are playing the same cards in the same way every time, you might as well be playing with your cards face-up. BECAUSE the game is so favored by the runner in a face-up situation, it becomes important as the corporation to ensure that the runner cannot transparently read what a card is from the way you play it.

The game being horrendously in favor of the runner when all cards are face-up is not a bad property. It's just a complex property that the corporation has to be aware of.
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Michele Lupo
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Not all corp cards are weaker. Compare Deja Vu against Archived Memories
 
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Corp cards themselves are almost always stronger. You can look also at PAD campaign and Cyberfeeder, etc. etc.

It's the game mechanics themselves that give the advantage to the Runner if not taking into account the hidden information that the Corp possesses. The runner can steal a Priority Req for a single action while it requires 12!! actions/credits for the Corp to score the same. A Corp's assets are also more vulnerable than the Runner's resources, considerably more vulnerable than the Runner's programs, and infinitely more vulnerable than the Runner's Hardware.
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Speaking of weaker cards though, virtually every piece of ice is more expensive to rez than it is to break once, and almost every piece of ice is also more expensive to rez than it costs the runner to let the subroutines go off given certain plausible assumptions (1 click, 2 credits remaining and no programs installed). This is why Tollbooth is so great, if the runner bounces off of it unprepared, when they come back later and go through it, they've paid more than you have on just that first run.

Ice only gets economical if the runner breaks through it multiple times. If the runner is on match point, almost all ice will cost the corp more than the runner, and thus, given approximate equal per turn credit gain or even slightly more gain for the corp, the corp can not get ahead in this way in any significant way. This should underline the importance of R&D and HQ in the early game. If the runner can grab enough points off of these early, all he needs to do is get all 3 breakers online and the size of the remote won't matter anymore. Unless, ofcourse, the corp manages to bluff the runner into running on something that turns out not to be an agenda.
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Darek C
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Interesting article but I think You havent really mentioned how important are "expose" cards. None of your examples includes situation when Runner plays Infiltration or use Lemuria Codecracker. While the latter isnt common for all factions Infiltration is a must have in all Runner decks. Personally I would never initiate a run against server with agenda/asset with 2 token without exposing it. You could say - "you don't always have Inflitration in your hand" Indeed but I do have it most of time and I almost always have it in mid-later game. And yes, my decks always contain Lemuria Codecracker.
 
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Geoff Hollis
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XdareckiX wrote:
Interesting article but I think You havent really mentioned how important are "expose" cards. None of your examples includes situation when Runner plays Infiltration or use Lemuria Codecracker. While the latter isnt common for all factions Infiltration is a must have in all Runner decks. Personally I would never initiate a run against server with agenda/asset with 2 token without exposing it. You could say - "you don't always have Inflitration in your hand" Indeed but I do have it most of time and I almost always have it in mid-later game. And yes, my decks always contain Lemuria Codecracker.


I agree, expose cards really change the landscape of the game. Perhaps infiltration and lemuria will be worth discussing in a future article. Trying to figure out what the chances are that your opponent will have an infiltration in hand is a very important skill to develop as a corporation.
 
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Orange Devil wrote:
If the runner is on match point, almost all ice will cost the corp more than the runner, and thus, given approximate equal per turn credit gain or even slightly more gain for the corp, the corp can not get ahead in this way in any significant way. This should underline the importance of R&D and HQ in the early game. If the runner can grab enough points off of these early, all he needs to do is get all 3 breakers online and the size of the remote won't matter anymore. Unless, of course, the corp manages to bluff the runner into running on something that turns out not to be an agenda.

This is a very important point. The ever increasing install costs for Ice on a single server are a big factor in this as well.

It also underscores why some cards are as good as they are.

Corporate Troubleshooter: Apart from completely messing with Anarch Breakers, this lets the corp match the Runner Credit for Credit (except vs Ninja) on a first run which Ice cannot do.

Infiltration: This keeps the runner from blowing their credit advantage (+ possibly their hand or rig) on an ambush.

Melange: It allows the Corp to beat any Runner in the credit standoff except those with Magnum Opus. To stop it they have to "run on something that turns out not to be they know is not an agenda."
 
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Spyder Murphy
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Until more agenda's come about the Tactics around advancing them will be limited. Add in that currently their are no non-trap assets that can be advanced, the advancing bluff/ game is restricted.

Until we get the likes of
http://www.netrunneronline.com/cards/pacifica-regional-ai/
http://www.netrunneronline.com/cards/information-laundering/

These type of cards will change that kind of game.
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I can't believe I didn't see this post before, awesome post.
 
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James 3
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Once Genesis is in play, there's a lot more to say about agenda theory.

The 1,3,5 maneuver? That's a great way to score a Mandotory upgrades, going from 3 to 6. Hard to do!

The install, then 3 move? Also great for mandatory upgrades at 6. Hmmm.

And deck construction allowing for more varied agenda plans is now possible. You can run no 3 point agendas and make the runner score atleast 4 to win. Or run lots of 3 pointers and end up with only 7 agendas in a 49 card deck, lowering random r&d loss, but making the corp have to overscore with expensive clunky agendas. Differening agenda compositions like this directly impact how you should advance and prioritize points. Lots to discuss here...

Honestly, my gang doesn't ambush heavily or use infiltration very much! Then again, most of our games are playtest games with other goals. This article makes me want to build more decks featuring Junebug.
 
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